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Hey! Me and my Wife are moving to the Uk (Plymouth) in a few months! We have never been to the the Uk or anywhere in Europe! Any advice? Thanks
 

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Hey! Me and my Wife are moving to the Uk (Plymouth) in a few months! We have never been to the the Uk or anywhere in Europe! Any advice? Thanks
Welcome to the forum!
Can you tell us a bit more about yourself? Are you coming over for a visit, or with a visa to work? Do you have a job already lined up? What are your nationalities? Do you hold a passport other than US perhaps, or are you eligible for one? What are your qualifications, skills and experience? What are you looking for in UK and Europe? How long you plan to be over?
 

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The question arises, why are you moving to Plymouth if you've never been to the UK before? If it's a job transfer, take advantage of all the services your employer is willing to give you - visas, relocation assistance, someone to take you flat or house hunting, etc. etc.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Hi, Ben! I am an American living in Plymouth with my English hubby and our 2 daughters, and have been for quite a while now. Like the others have said, if you give us a little more background into why you are moving here, we might be able to help you better. :)

 

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Hey! Me and my Wife are moving to the Uk (Plymouth) in a few months! We have never been to the the Uk or anywhere in Europe! Any advice? Thanks
Not really sure on your situation but i'd advise you to NOT rent a property...or if you have ot intially make it as short as you can.

Rental here is extortion. Plymouth is the complete opposite end of the country to me and i'm up at the cheaper end.
A crappy little 2 bedroom flat in my town (which is a terrible town) costs £575 per month rent.

To give you a comparison, my mortgage is only £480 per month and that's for a 2 bedroom house in the nice part of town where the more well off people live. It's small for a house but much larger than the rentable flats and at least you own it!!!


Other than that...(which may not even be any help at all) i can't think of anything.

I have no idea what Plymouth is like, my company has a premises down there but i've never been
 

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Hey! Me and my Wife are moving to the Uk (Plymouth) in a few months! We have never been to the the Uk or anywhere in Europe! Any advice? Thanks
Sort out a currency broker in the US before you leave, so that you're registered on to their system. When abroad you'll need to transfer money US->UK and so makes sense to have someone/Co in the US who can help you with that. Not saying that you can't do it via a UK broker, but probably more practical the other way round. So much easier if done whilst you have all the documents and a valid address that is required to complete the necessarily strict financial checks for such companies.
 

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Hey! Me and my Wife are moving to the Uk (Plymouth) in a few months! We have never been to the the Uk or anywhere in Europe! Any advice? Thanks

Hello!
I used to live in the West Country. Plymouth isn't the prettiest city, but Devon and Cornwall have some of the loveliest old towns and gorgeous countryside in Britain. Get out and about and see it, but if possible, for actually living in, stick to the city, because the villages tend to be nice to look at but inbred to live in (if you haven't been there for 600 year's you're nobody.) One thing you will find is that people often don't come across as friendly. I'm sorry to say, don't expect warmth and an apple pie on arrival. It's nothing personal, and it doesn't mean people don't like you - it's just that we are lacking in personal charm and social skills, and the culture encourages this. Of course, there are also some genuinely frosty, morose gits, but don't let them get you down. As a general rule, people are a little wary of too much effusiveness. On the other hand, when you get friendly behaviour from a Brit it is entirely genuine; and if you find organisations and activities that you enjoy, you will tap into the Brits who actually like to join in and communicate. Things like the National Trust are always looking for volunteers on all sorts of projects; they offer family membership, so not only would you get free entry into loads of really lovely parks, castles, etc, but you could make a lot of friends while doing something worthwhile. Also, people are very tolerant. They might just nod and grunt as they pass you, but if you happen to be wearing a pointy hat, a tutu and army boots they won't turn a hair and would be the first to defend your right to do so. You'll also find that we have a well-developed sense of humour. Euro surveys show that British people laugh almost twice as much as other Europeans. Try not to take everything that's said, literally! The weather can be incredibly depressing. If you want to go out and the sun is shining and going out is remotely possible, then GO. It rains on average every 2.4 days, and if you delay going, you could be in for a long wait! The food really isn't as horrible as the reputation of it - if you want a really nice meal in friendly surroundings, most big pubs do a "carvery" every Sunday, usually for abou £6 - 7 per head including all you can eat, and dessert, and kids are welcome. Talking of that... there is NOTHING like an English pub for atmosphere. Track down the nearest nice one to you, and go there regularly. If you've got kids, find one with a garden or family room. This is not like a "bar" - the local pub is a very important part of the community, where you'll find all sorts of social events. And if you find one you like and go there regularly - especially as a foreigner, being noticeable - you'll start to become part of the community. Obviously there's no real language problem, but if someone asks you what time you want to be knocked up in the morning, they mean, what time do you want an alarm call! If you can get it - Amazon sell it - look for a book called "Notes from a Small Island", by Bill Bryson, an American who lived in England for 20 years. It's accurate, and very funny, and shows the place from an American's point of view. (And if it helps - after a few years in a beautiful house in Vermont, and against the wishes of his wife and kids, he came back to Blighty.)
Above all - all the best, and good luck!
 
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