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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like information on moving to the south of France. I recently visited Paris and my girlfriend has been to France three times already. She's been to the south of France and well after talking about the desire to move to another country in the future, I told her why not move to the south of France? Can anybody provide me some good helpful information on moving to France. She and I live in the U.S.
 

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The big "challenge" in moving to France is getting a long-stay visa to do so. If you're planning on working, you need a work visa, which generally means you need to find a job in France first and then have your employer sponsor your visa application. The employer needs to get permission from the Ministry of Labor to hire a non-EU foreign national - usually involves showing how and why they have been unable to find a suitable job candidate from within the EU.

To move on a "visitor" visa (i.e. without working privileges) you have to show that you have the resources to live in France without resorting to working (and, if you're of working age, that you won't be tempted to work under the table). It really helps if you have a "reason" for wanting to live in France: research (if you're a published author, say), a sabbatical year (if you're a university professor), etc.

Unless you're married, you'll each have to qualify for your own visa. If you do get married and one of you finds a job, chances are the "trailing spouse" will not be able to work (i.e. if they come over on a dependent visa).

For the basics on visa requirements, check the website of the French consulate that covers the area where you are currently living. San Francisco if you're in the north of California, LA if you're in the south.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Moving to South of France

Thanks for the helpful information. Actually me and my girlfriend are going to live and work here in California as attorneys. We plan on saving up and plan on moving in the next 20-25 years from now.




The big "challenge" in moving to France is getting a long-stay visa to do so. If you're planning on working, you need a work visa, which generally means you need to find a job in France first and then have your employer sponsor your visa application. The employer needs to get permission from the Ministry of Labor to hire a non-EU foreign national - usually involves showing how and why they have been unable to find a suitable job candidate from within the EU.

To move on a "visitor" visa (i.e. without working privileges) you have to show that you have the resources to live in France without resorting to working (and, if you're of working age, that you won't be tempted to work under the table). It really helps if you have a "reason" for wanting to live in France: research (if you're a published author, say), a sabbatical year (if you're a university professor), etc.

Unless you're married, you'll each have to qualify for your own visa. If you do get married and one of you finds a job, chances are the "trailing spouse" will not be able to work (i.e. if they come over on a dependent visa).

For the basics on visa requirements, check the website of the French consulate that covers the area where you are currently living. San Francisco if you're in the north of California, LA if you're in the south.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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