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My husband (French) was offered a position to transfer to Paris. We have received the notice that they have selected us...but we are awaiting the proposal.

I am an American Citizen our child is dual.

We are just trying to make sure this is the right thing for our family.

This is a great opportunity for our child to learn French in France as well as for me.

We will not be requiring housing as we have an apartment in Paris.

What things should we take into account? Financially (taxes, benefits??). Our child is an infant so no need for schooling (unless we want to place him in a daycare for a few hours 2 days a week for interaction with other children).

I will not be working but do I still need to obtain a carte de sejour? Is there costs associated? We will prb ask the company to cover this.

Anything you can think of that we should research would be helpful. We want to have all of our ducks in a row.

Thanks for your help.
 

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Congratulations - this sounds like a great opportunity for the whole family!

As the spouse of a french national, you're going to need to get a long-stay visa, but other than lots of paperwork, it shouldn't be too much of a problem. This is the page of the OFII regarding your situation: OFII - Office Français de l’Immigration et de l’Intégration

Basically, if you haven't already registered your marriage with the French consulate, you should do so now so that you can get a livret de famille (though if your child is registered with the consulate, chances are you're all set on that score). The visa is nearly automatic, though they will have to assess your level of French. When you get to France, you go through the new OFII procedure of validating your visa for the first year - after that you'll probably get a carte de séjour, or possibly the longer-term carte de residente.

You may want to look into or contact the AAWE in Paris Home Page This is an association of American women married to Europeans who work on maintaining their bi-cultural ties within the family. They have play groups for the kids (so they keep up their English) and activities you may be interested in.

As far as taxes and benefits go, it kind of depends on what you're looking for with this move/transfer. If you're not sure whether to make this a permanent transfer, you might want some assurance that the company will move you back to the US should the position not work out for any reason. Other than that, the usual relocation costs, etc. Health plan and retirement benefits are obligatory when you're working in France, so that's not really an issue.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Whoops, just thought of one other thing...

If your husband has been living and working in the US, he will definitely want to consider what to do about his US immigration status. Presumably he's on a green card, but he'll have to give that up if you move to France. If he's got enough time in the US, you may want to consider having him take US citizenship, which would greatly simplify things should you ever decide to move back to the US.

OTOH, if he takes US citizenship, then you're both required to file US income taxes from overseas, no matter where you are. It's advantageous from one point of view, because then you'll be able to file as "married filing jointly" which usually works out better for you.

But, if he doesn't take US citizenship, then he won't have to file US taxes once he's no longer resident in the US. If you're not working, you probably won't have enough income to have to file from overseas. If you do go to work in France, you'll have to file - as "married filing separately" which can get awkward.

It's definitely not something to base your decision on, but just be aware that you need to take a decision before you move as to whether or not he will go for US citizenship - and what the ramifications of that will be.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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