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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,
I am brand new to the site and hope getting some answers to my questions.
I have lived in New York City since 85 and hope to start a new life in Paris which is a city that I don't know at all.
I am French native and also have an American citizenship, my question is if I have paid income taxes for over the years in the US, could the years be transferred or taken in consideration for my social security and retirement in France?
Thank you.
 

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Not for social security - but maybe for retirement.

First of all, as a US citizen, you will be expected to continue filing US tax returns no matter where in the world you live. There is an income tax treaty between the US and France and while you'll be expected to file returns/declarations to both the US IRS and the French fisc, there are ways to avoid double taxation of the same income.

On the retirement side, there is also a treaty, referred to as the "social security" treaty - even though it only concerns retirement benefits. If you have accumulated the necessary "quarters" of coverage in the US, you'll receive your US social security benefit, even if you live in France when you retire.

To draw a French retirement, you'll have to have worked for some period of time in France and contributed to the French retirement system. Given that you won't be able to accumulate the 40 or 42 years of credits you'd need for a full pension, they may be able to credit you for some of your time worked in the US system. You can get credit for the time you've worked, but not for your salary levels outside of France.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Thank you Bev for your prompt response.
I will be going to France in this coming May for a couple of job interviews, will also plan to start my paperwork of reinsertion. I worked only 3 months in France before moving to the US, 25 years ago, should I redo my papers in my small hometown Tourcoing where my family lives and then go to Paris. Or do all my papers in Paris. Also I don't know where my driving license or SS number are? Can they retrieve all my info fo years ago?
 

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You may want to check the Service Public website for some of the more detailed information. Accueil Particuliers - Service-public.fr

In general, though, I believe they really want you to use your original social security number and they should be able to dredge that up. (Though expect a certain amount of kwetching from the fonctionnaire who has to do the work.)

Driving license you'll have to re-do based on what license you currently hold (i.e. whether or not it's exchangeable) - but at least ask at the prefecture.

If you're going to be living in Paris, you should probably do your paperwork there. It may be worthwhile to wait a bit until you have a job nailed down and have your residence sorted.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Thank you Bev, I will definitely have to nail the job first, regarding a place to stay, I have a friend who can help me out until I get a place on my own.
Is it true that I won't be able to rent anything until I build up my credit history?
I have to have an address for verification, is a cellular phone bill is enough to build my credit?
Also a big question, I have a Roth Ira and a regular Ira, what should I do with it, how can I transfer or retrieve the money without losing too much with the exchange rate, I was thinking about buying a place in Paris eventually and use it as a deposit.
 

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The credit history issue is common to all returning expats - even in the US. You don't really have a "credit history" in France like in the US. What most landlords or rental agents want to see is 3 months of pay slips showing a salary adequate to pay the rent. There is a law somewhere that limits rent and mortgage payments to 30% or so of your gross pay. Not sure of the details, nor of how it's enforced - but most rental agents stick pretty closely to the guidelines. Lacking three months worth of pay slips, you can get a guarantor (co-signer, in American parlance) or pre-pay 6 to 12 months of rent.

On the Roth and regular IRA, normally I'd advise that you just leave them in place until you need them. But as long as you can withdraw from the Roth IRA without paying US taxes, that's probably your best bet. If you are withdrawing from the regular IRA, you'll play full income tax on the amount you withdraw plus a 10% penalty if you aren't age 59 1/2 yet. On the French side, it's considered a transfer of capital and not even reportable on your income taxes.

To transfer either, check first with the company that holds your IRA. I've been told by the place I have my IRA that they will make the transfers free of charge and they'll do the conversion to euros before they transfer (which can eliminate some charges at the receiving bank in France). As far as which way the euro is going, that's anyone's guess.

I've used my mobile phone bill as a proof of address, but they won't always take that. (They prefer an EDF or France Telecom land line bill, but will usually take any bill in your name sent to you at the address you are claiming as your residence.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Thank you Bev, you are incredibly knowledgeable.
I have a question, I just receive my permanent license as a skin therapist in New York City, am I allowed to work in Paris in a spa or do they require international certification?
 

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Thank you Bev, you are incredibly knowledgeable.
I have a question, I just receive my permanent license as a skin therapist in New York City, am I allowed to work in Paris in a spa or do they require international certification?
Most licensing in the US is for the particular state only. There is no such thing as international certification for stuff like skin therapy. Closest thing I know of in France is aestheticienne - and for that you need to undergo the training here in France.

Either the Ministere du Travail or the Paris Chambre de Commerce should have some files on their website about the various professions. Start by looking for aestheticienne and see what the requirements are for that and any specialties within the profession.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I came to live in Paris thinking it was a wonderful city. All I have found is miserable weather and homophobic jerks demonstrating every other weekend. They are outside now blaring their hatred on giant microphones. Paris is not a loving city, it is filled with homophobes. I want to return to the USA
 

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Hi Jeff

I came to live in Paris thinking it was a wonderful city. All I have found is miserable weather and homophobic jerks demonstrating every other weekend. They are outside now blaring their hatred on giant microphones. Paris is not a loving city, it is filled with homophobes. I want to return to the USA
Hi Jeff
Sorry to hear that you are having a bad experience in Paris, do you have a work contract that you have to stay there?
They have a gay neighborhood near the Marais, no?
We are in 2013, I don't understand why people are still homophobic, tell them "to snap out of it"
I decided not to move to Paris, the work offer was not what I was looking for.
Yes the weather is terrible, very few sunny days.
I hope you make a decision that will make you happy:)
 

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I came to live in Paris thinking it was a wonderful city. All I have found is miserable weather and homophobic jerks demonstrating every other weekend. They are outside now blaring their hatred on giant microphones. Paris is not a loving city, it is filled with homophobes. I want to return to the USA
Sorry to hear you're have a bad time of it here. Today's anti-gay-marriage demonstrations may be the last round of them. (Or so we can hope.) The law is already passed and promulgated, with the first marriage scheduled to take place tomorrow.

Change comes slowly to France, and you always get big demonstrations with a major social shift like this. Paris is about as "loving" as any big major city - people tend to keep to themselves and it can difficult to integrate when you're from "out of town."

Do you have the option to go back to the US?
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I came to live in Paris thinking it was a wonderful city. All I have found is miserable weather and homophobic jerks demonstrating every other weekend. They are outside now blaring their hatred on giant microphones. Paris is not a loving city, it is filled with homophobes. I want to return to the USA
I am sorry that Paris is so different to what you expected.
It is true that the weather is not nice in Paris. I don't know how long you have been in Paris, this year has been particularly miserable. Usually at this time of the year, you can wear a t-shirt and enjoy the long evenings with you friends at terraces. There is a page on FB showing the weather forecast for the last 4 years compared to this one.
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?...242625556001.136005.1577715910&type=1&theater

Regarding homophobia, again this year does not reflect the norm. I have lived many year in le marais and it was really peaceful. The law making same sex marriage possible has activated a huge homophobia that I did not suspect existed in Paris.

I am not saying Paris is a dream place, otherwise, I'd still be living there. I wish you'd had a chance to experience actual Paris with it's normal gray days and normal atmosphere where everyone can live their life. Hopefully the coming months will be back to normal and if you still choose to go back home, it will be with some nice parisian days to remember!
 
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