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Moving to Larissa, Greece

6115 Views 10 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  CanUSDaveK.
I am originally from Canada and living in Columbus, Ohio and now moving to Larissa. Other than all the standard info I was wondering if anyone could give me the inside details of things to bring and what to put in storage. Will be living there for 3 years...any help would be great. I am not sure of what to expect for renting a home and local details. Can anyone help?
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I am not sure of what to expect for renting a home and local details. Can anyone help?
i highly recommend taking a look at livingingreece.gr before and during your time in greece. it's written by someone who has lived and worked in greece for more than 10 years, and it's got a lot of practical info, advice and trips not available anywhere else in english. plus, theres a news feed she runs from twitter (subscribe, if you already have an account or sign up); the info she gives there is a direct translation from greek news that never makes it to english language news.

all best, sn
I am originally from Canada and living in Columbus, Ohio and now moving to Larissa. Other than all the standard info I was wondering if anyone could give me the inside details of things to bring and what to put in storage. Will be living there for 3 years...any help would be great. I am not sure of what to expect for renting a home and local details. Can anyone help?
Hello,
I'm from the US and I have been living in Larisa for about 8 months now. I didn't bring much with me so I can't be too helpful regarding shipping however I would think that shipping furniture would almost be more hassle and expense than it is worth. Especially if you are only going to be here for 3 years. I left all of my furniture in the US so I would be set when/if I return. That said, they just opened up an IKEA outside of town so most things that you may need can be purchased fairly inexpensively.

As far as housing in Larisa goes, those apartments closer to the city center are a tad more expensive . . 300-400 for a one bedroom. I live outside of the center but walk into town most everyday . . which takes 25 minutes so not far. Apartments in my area, which is quite nice, are a tad less . . . 250 a month, just because we are outside the center. However, you can find a place to park at anytime which isn't always possible in the center.

Other than that, the city itself isn't spectacular but it is situated nicely. The sea is a 30 minute drive as are the mountains. It has definitely grown on me. There is less English spoken here than you would find in Athens or Thessaloniki so learning at least some Greek is going to be very beneficial.

I hope this is somewhat helpful.
Marie
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definitley leave your stuff in canada. ikea is great for a start at furnishing your aprtment and delivery is very cheap compared to back in uK.
Thanks for the info.

Thanks for the info it has been useful in getting a baseline of knowledge. I really don't have to worry much about the paperwork and Visas as we will be going there under US government employment. I am still wondering about food and culture and the impact on a 7 year old. I know we can get adapters for electronic items but is it damaging to the electronics over time (TV's, computers, etc..).

I have been warned not to ship large vehicles from the U.S. as well. First the vehicles get quite damaged in shipping, secondly the roads are more narrow in Larissa and it is not only difficult to park but damage from other vehicles as well. Is this true?

Are there any restrictions on bringing pets, I have been told that you just need a Vets certificate of health which is current (within 10 days of departure), are there no Quarantines for animals in Greece?
Thanks for the info. I am not to worried about expenses as good old Uncle Sam will handle all our shipping requirements as well as a nice housing allowance. I am more worried about what impact a change in culture will have on my daughter. She will attend the International School near there. I am looking for hints of things to include in our express shipment of goods to make life more easier to adjust for her. Certain food items, impact of using adapters on electronic devices over long periods, Internet services, etc... There are some new things avail like Vonage Intenet Phones which are run using a US phone number so people don't have to call internationally, another is a cable box that is connected through a cable box in the US and routed over the internet so you can watch regular US programs on television.

I just want to try and make thechange as easy as possible with also allowing her to continue to fololw the US culture (not that it is better) but will keep her up to date on things for when we return.

If you have any more suggestions I will appreciate all the help I can get.

Thanks
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Thanks for the info it has been useful in getting a baseline of knowledge. I really don't have to worry much about the paperwork and Visas as we will be going there under US government employment. I am still wondering about food and culture and the impact on a 7 year old. I know we can get adapters for electronic items but is it damaging to the electronics over time (TV's, computers, etc..).

I have been warned not to ship large vehicles from the U.S. as well. First the vehicles get quite damaged in shipping, secondly the roads are more narrow in Larissa and it is not only difficult to park but damage from other vehicles as well. Is this true?

Are there any restrictions on bringing pets, I have been told that you just need a Vets certificate of health which is current (within 10 days of departure), are there no Quarantines for animals in Greece?

The roads are much more narrow than in the US. Parking in the city center in Larisa can be aggravating to impossible. If I have to park downtown for any reason, I give myself an extra 20-25 minutes to find a place to park. On a good day, this is enough time. I really can't imagine how a normal sized SUV would do on the roads here.

I don't think adapters wear on the electronics. I have used one on my computer for years, both in Greece and in the UK. As for the pets, I have no idea.

As for the food, there are many options for eating out and there is never a supermarket very far. There are also a number of farmer's markets in different parts of town, on different days of the week. The produce is much, much better than in the stores and much less expensive so they are worth frequenting. Eating out all the time can be very expensive.
I have found the available cuisine to be much more limited in Larisa than to what you would find in the US. This isn't to say it isn't good, it is, but there aren't a lot of options outside of Greek food.

Culturally, I hope you like coffee and spending time in cafes.
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Once again thanks for the info, in preparation for our move I have watched "My Life In Ruins" several times..lol They say there is always time for a coffee. I look forward to moving, hopefully I can sell the house in this market for not to great a loss and get underway.
Once again thanks for the info, in preparation for our move I have watched "My Life In Ruins" several times..lol They say there is always time for a coffee. I look forward to moving, hopefully I can sell the house in this market for not to great a loss and get underway.
Things to include foodwise: If you do any amount of baking you had better pack a lot of brown sugar, they don't have any here . . . drives me crazy. No cranberries either. Don't plan on eating too many muffins or other typically American baked goods. Really though, you can get most things you can in the US, you just won't have such a variety. There may just be one or two kinds of peanut butter . . . not 50. My husband, a Greek, buys Oreos every week so there is plenty of familiar food. The cereal selection is getting better but it is still limited compared to the US and a lot more expensive. That said, Greek food is really good and the diet is very healthy so jumping on board the eating habits here isn't a bad idea.

I talk to everyone at home using Skype which is the free internet calling service. I have been using it for 5 years and I couldn't calculate how much money it has saved me. Also, if you and your contact both have a webcam then you have video calling. I have watched my niece grow up over Skype. I can't recommend it enough.

I haven't heard about your cable box but that sounds interesting. They do show a lot of US tv shows over here . . not as many for children. Even though I don't have children yet I have been a school teacher for some years and kids tend to be pretty adaptable and because Greece is a European country . . . it's not like moving to some country where aspects of the culture could be unrecognizable and confusing to an outsider. I have never run into cultural misunderstandings here like I have in West Africa . . . it's pretty adaptable. The one thing to get ready for is that Greeks don't tend to sugarcoat things. They can be pretty blunt and direct, which can be a nice change but it can take a little time to get used to.
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Pets

You need to make sure any pets are vaccinated, including rabies, although I don't think there is much rabies here in Greece.

Speak to a local vet when you arrive and find out what precautions you should take against local diseases, mostly borne by insects. Pets may need tick collars and regularly treatment to help them being bitten by sand-flies, for instance.

We brought two dogs with us when we moved and they have adapted well and I know people who have arrived with cats as well.

Just be aware that the Greek attitude to domestic animals is not the same as you are used to. Many Greeks are afraid of dogs and believe that they should be tied up outside all the time.

It is one of the things I don't think I will ever get used to here, although attitudes are changing slowly.
Thanks again for the info. We do not have to worry to much about the baked goods as we don't usually go out of our way for them. My daughter is quite a picky eater so I am concerned on how she will adapt. Most meats are not a problem, she eats broccoli, beets, cauliflower, carrots (uncooked) and celery. Fruits are sometime a hit or miss, strawberries are her favorite. She will normally eat the icing from baked goods and of course chocolate and ice cream (we avoid the chocolate becuase if it is in the house I will eat it, my weakness). I am looking foward to arriving but not so much the move....
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