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Hello everyone,
Myself and my wife will be moving to the south of France [Beziers area ] this September to live, both will not be working and both early retirement.
Without spending hours on the internet researching, could anyone inform me of what we need for register in France:
-Medical/Dentist
- Taxes
- Car
- anything else

Do I have to make appointment with the village Mayor!

Thank you in advance

Kind Regards
Kevin
 

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As a citizen of the EU, you don't actually "register" as such on arrival in France. At least not as a new resident.

This is the official word on the Service Public site: Européen "inactif" en France : séjour de plus de 3 mois - Service-public.fr

Basically, you may want to ask for a carte de séjour, though it's not necessary to get one. Many Brits get tired of carrying their passport around for identification (normally your national i.d. card would work, but since the Brits don't have one of those...) so they get a carte de séjour. (A few prefectures are cranky about issuing them to those who don't absolutely "need" one, but they do come in handy at times.)

You don't actually "register" here with a doctor or dentist. If you were on the French national health system, you'd select a "medecin traitant" (i.e. your primary doctor, but it doesn't have to be a GP), however as early retirees, you won't be eligible for the French system until you start drawing a British pension and can produce an S1 (or whatever it's called these days - it keeps changing).

In the meantime, you'll need to carry private health coverage.

Taxes - after the end of your first calendar year, you should see your local tax office to get the necessary forms to file. Even if you haven't lived a full 183 days in France the first year, it can be useful to file a declaration, since it may give you some benefits when they assess your taxe d'habitation the following September.

You'll be expected to re-register your car shortly after taking up residence. (Basically, once you have a utility bill or two you can use to prove your residence in France.) Here is the official word on that process: Un étranger qui s'installe en France doit-il y faire immatriculer son véhicule ? - Service-public.fr

It doesn't hurt to pay a visit to the local mairie, introduce yourselves as new in town and ask for whatever information booklets or pamphlets they have available. They often publish lists of the various clubs and associations in town, bus routes and rubbish collection schedules, or check their town website for details.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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The above comments are accurate. However, be prepared for a big culture shock on how daily life here works as opposed to the UK.

You might want to invite your neighbours in for an apéro - we can explain if you wish! Be prepared for some hard work if you want to integrate into French life.

Feel free to post questions - I assure you that you will have many!

DejW

Hello everyone,
Myself and my wife will be moving to the south of France [Beziers area ] this September to live, both will not be working and both early retirement.
Without spending hours on the internet researching, could anyone inform me of what we need for register in France:
-Medical/Dentist
- Taxes
- Car
- anything else

Do I have to make appointment with the village Mayor!

Thank you in advance

Kind Regards
Kevin
 

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Not quite correct re healthcare.If you are an EU inactive you can join the French Healthcare system once you have lived in France for 3 months and have an income over €9601.You will pay 8% of your household income above this figure and you will need a top up insurance of some description as the French state system only 70% of medical costs.Are you going to bring your own car here?
I would strongly suggest that you do loads of research before you come here otherwise you may be in for a big shock
 

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Not quite correct re healthcare.If you are an EU inactive you can join the French Healthcare system once you have lived in France for 3 months and have an income over €9601.You will pay 8% of your household income above this figure and you will need a top up insurance of some description as the French state system only 70% of medical costs.Are you going to bring your own car here?
I would strongly suggest that you do loads of research before you come here otherwise you may be in for a big shock
But bear in mind that it can take a couple of months for your application (for the CMU) to be processed, and that you need that minimum income, and that they will ask you to provide evidence of some health cover for the period from arrival until your application.
 

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Here are a few ideas to help you settle/integrate.

Shop locally - especially for bread, fruit, veg. Small shopkeepers will get to know you.
Ask French people for advice - it makes them feel a little superior - even if it is for something simple. Best shops, best hairdresser ....
Don't get angry if there are problems - laugh and drink wine
Ask for help - see above. And hand out bottles of whisky to those who help you. No French person is ever offended by a decent malt. And don't complain if the put coke (the drink!) in it.
Don't complain to French people unless you are sure they feel the same way too. My pet hate - pun intended - is the constant barking of dogs, but I only voice this to French people whose neighbours have dogs.
Don't criticise France to French people, or suggest that things are done better in other countries
Speak French, even if it's pre-school French
Buy French wine - no more Australian, S African, Chilean ....


I am sure other posters will have good advice too
 

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To integrate, just join something - a club, an association - that is into something you really enjoy. Photo Club, the local "third age" club, hiking group, exercise class, flower arranging. Whatever they have. (Even better if there is a local AVF group - a newcomers' association made up of French and foreigners.)

By pursuing something you're interested in, you have a natural bond with the other folks, and some motivation to pick up the terms you need to participate. And if you're in something like the AVF, offer to do language exchanges with folks who want to practice their English in exchange for helping you with your French.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Many Anglophones go into a sort of culture shock when they move to France. Remember that France is simply different and that you are not familiar with the way things are done here.

Don't demand customer service, and especially not when it comes to French administration. They will certainly take offence. Bear in mind that pretty much all work here is classed as a 'metier' and French workers, be they public servants or in the private sector, expect respect; if you don't give it, expect things to get more difficult.

That's not to say that you shouldn't follow up on things that should have been processed, but you need to do it politely.

Remember that nearly everything grinds to a halt during the summer holiday period (July/August), some shops close down completely, clubs/associations are mostly inactive from May to mid September. Don't complain about it, just be prepared.

The French are generally great moaners, but they don't expect expats to moan about France :D

Work on your French language - it's a must.

That said, France can be a wonderful place to live - provided you can adjust :D

Good luck,
 

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Not quite correct re healthcare.If you are an EU inactive you can join the French Healthcare system once you have lived in France for 3 months and have an income over €9601.You will pay 8% of your household income above this figure and you will need a top up insurance of some description as the French state system only 70% of medical costs.Are you going to bring your own car here?
I would strongly suggest that you do loads of research before you come here otherwise you may be in for a big shock
Healthcare after three months is not a given in my experience crabbers. I came as an an inactif with an S1 that lasted for the first two years of my moving here. I then applied to join the French healthcare system and was initially rebuffed. they can still quote the five year residency rule. I was persistent and polite and seem to have got in, but depending on your department, i dont believe the french see it as an automatic right.
 

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I came to France as an early retiree, not working/earning, but was added to my French partner's carte vitale after a few months of living here. I have to renew annually until we are married. Perhaps it does depend on where you live.

Good luck to the OP!
 

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If your French partner is enrolled in the sécu system here, you can generally get coverage from him/her provided you have some legal relationship (i.e. married or PACSd). It used to be quite common for folks to add a live-in to their sécu coverage without benefit of the legalities, but they appear to have changed that a few years back. Or maybe not.... you never know around here!
Cheers,
Bev
 
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