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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a great site, and hopefully it will assist with our decision.

We have starting seriously planning moving to France from Australia. We hold both an Australian and EU p/p as both my husband and myself were born in Malta. Would we be able to come and go as we please or is the visa restricted?

To assist our income, we might consider (if allowed) having French students wishing to learn English.
If I decide to work part-time, will I need a special visa?
My husband will be in receipt of an Australian state pension (pretty basic really!).

When buying property:

a. is there stamp duty?
b. are there any concessions for EU p/p holders over the age of 65?
c. what is the 'usual length' for a settlement period?

Medical/Hospital Issues:

a. Is there any 'free' cover, or would we require 'visitor visa insurance'.

I'm really hoping someone can help us start the ball rolling :fingerscrossed:, so your answers will be much appreciated.

Kind regards

Mym
 

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First of all, the good news: as EU nationals, there is no visa requirement for settling in France. Just show up and get on with it.

Now, the not-so-good news is that establishing yourself in France can be something of a hassle unless you have a job or family or other roots here. Renters are normally required to show three months worth of pay slips (and French pay slips at that) to establish their credit-worthiness, so you may have to get a bit creative.

If you want to work on your own account (i.e. freelance) you'll be expected to establish some form of "business entity" - anything from an Auto-Entrepreneur to a formal EURL or EIRL (there are other forms of business for couples who want to go into business together or with third parties). With an AE, you pay cotisations (social insurances) based on your gross take, with no allowance for expenses. Details are here: Portail officiel des auto-entrepreneurs

When buying property:

a. is there stamp duty?
b. are there any concessions for EU p/p holders over the age of 65?
c. what is the 'usual length' for a settlement period?
a. not as such, but there are notaire fees that have to be paid.
b. not really. Once you start filing income taxes in France, you may be able to get concessions on your redevance (TV tax) and/or taxe d'habitation based on age and income level. But the first year you normally pay full freight.
c. Figure on at least 3 months from accepted offer to "close" on a residential property.

Medical/Hospital Issues:

a. Is there any 'free' cover, or would we require 'visitor visa insurance'.
French national cover is based on having paid contributions. You are required to carry private health insurance if you are not eligible for the national system. If you set up an AE and pay into the system for a few months, you will get national coverage. Just be aware that the national coverage in France is only partial (you're reimbursed about 70% of what your actual costs are) and that it's normally very advisable to have a "mutuelle" or top-up coverage to reimburse the difference between actual cost and what the state reimburses. You can sign up for a mutuelle when you register an AE, or you can find a mutuelle on your own. Cost of a mutuelle is normally per person rather than a percentage of your revenue.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Bev - that's really useful; I would have thought that if one could prove a healthy bank balance renting would not be a problem for a short term until we found what we wanted, but such are the rules! My cousin lives in Dordogne so maybe he can be 'classed' as a relative! I will however look into (a) obtaining some form of part time work and (b) look into the Health insurance side of things.
It's interesting that there is no stamp duty on property, I will look into the notaire's fees and see how they stack up.

Regards

Mym
 

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For a "short term" a healthy bank account may be sufficient - though you'll be renting something considered a "holiday home" (i.e. furnished). The rental laws in France can be very different between furnished accommodation and unfurnished. With unfurnished residential property, there are many protections for the renters (like they can't be evicted for not paying the rent - or anything else - during the winter months) so the landlords have to be very sure of their tenants.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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When buying property:

a. is there stamp duty?
b. are there any concessions for EU p/p holders over the age of 65?
As Bev said above no stamp duty as such but the notaires fees are about 7/8 % of the sales price - the price not including the agents commission.
are there any concessions for EU p/p holders over the age of 65?.... There are some travel concessions but nothing of any significance but you do get a tax free allowance on your pension of 10% up to a limit. See Simulateur de calcul d'impôt sur le revenu - Démarches - Le Particulier for a handy calculator.

Regards


Tank
 
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