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Hi everyone. I'm an American currently living in Ireland with my Dutch partner. We are looking to move to the Netherlands between June-August 2010. I want to become a teacher. I was originally planning to go the UK for the PGCE in Secondary English, but we always intended to move to the Netherlands after that.

We've recently discovered how cheap it would be for me to train as a teacher in the Netherlands (as I would be on a partner visa, giving me the same rights as a Dutch citizen); however, my Dutch is not up to par. I can ask for things at the table, follow basic conversation and be firm with children (worked as an au pair in Den Haag for 3 months). This is not enough for college or teaching.

I have a BA in English with experience as a writing tutor for both native and non-native English speakers. I understand it takes 2 years to qualify and that I could separate the 2 years, doing an MA in English Language and Culture first. Doing that I could spend the year working on my Dutch as well. We were thinking of moving to Groningen as most of the family is there.

Can anyone offer advice on here? I know there is a teacher shortage there, but I believe you have to have Dutch to teach at a state school. As for the international schools, I would need to have 2-3 years of teaching experience.

Also, is it possible to teach without certification and work towards certification whilst working?

Any help in regards to this will be much appreciated. As far as universities go, I was looking at Groningen, Leiden, Amsterdam and Nijmegen.

Hope someone can help. Thanks in advance.
 

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Hi everyone. I'm an American currently living in Ireland with my Dutch partner. We are looking to move to the Netherlands between June-August 2010. I want to become a teacher. I was originally planning to go the UK for the PGCE in Secondary English, but we always intended to move to the Netherlands after that.

We've recently discovered how cheap it would be for me to train as a teacher in the Netherlands (as I would be on a partner visa, giving me the same rights as a Dutch citizen); however, my Dutch is not up to par. I can ask for things at the table, follow basic conversation and be firm with children (worked as an au pair in Den Haag for 3 months). This is not enough for college or teaching.

I have a BA in English with experience as a writing tutor for both native and non-native English speakers. I understand it takes 2 years to qualify and that I could separate the 2 years, doing an MA in English Language and Culture first. Doing that I could spend the year working on my Dutch as well. We were thinking of moving to Groningen as most of the family is there.

Can anyone offer advice on here? I know there is a teacher shortage there, but I believe you have to have Dutch to teach at a state school. As for the international schools, I would need to have 2-3 years of teaching experience.

Also, is it possible to teach without certification and work towards certification whilst working?

Any help in regards to this will be much appreciated. As far as universities go, I was looking at Groningen, Leiden, Amsterdam and Nijmegen.

Hope someone can help. Thanks in advance.
I cannot speak for the Netherlands, but I can for international teaching. I was hired to teach overseas with only one year of experience. The jobs are there, and you can get an interview before the recruitment fairs start (usually in January, so get your name out there asap).

There are programs that allow you to teach without certification while working towards it, but I don't know if they would apply to your situation. Be wary of any overseas school that hires a lot of teachers without certification. It tends to end up as a dodgy situation.

Best of luck to you in your endeavors!
 

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I'm an American currently living in Ireland with my Dutch partner.
We are looking to move to the Netherlands between June-August 2010.
...
(as I would be on a partner visa, giving me the same rights as a Dutch citizen)
Remember your wife is living in IRL under EU rights (see Directive 2004/38/EC) and so are you.
If you keep proof of this stay both of will return to NL and enjoy the same benefits.

This means you will not need a partner visa but will be issued (on request) a Dutch residence card for the family member of an EU national (you should have one in IRL already).
 

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Hi everyone. I'm an American currently living in Ireland with my Dutch partner. We are looking to move to the Netherlands between June-August 2010. I want to become a teacher. I was originally planning to go the UK for the PGCE in Secondary English, but we always intended to move to the Netherlands after that.

We've recently discovered how cheap it would be for me to train as a teacher in the Netherlands (as I would be on a partner visa, giving me the same rights as a Dutch citizen); however, my Dutch is not up to par. I can ask for things at the table, follow basic conversation and be firm with children (worked as an au pair in Den Haag for 3 months). This is not enough for college or teaching.

I have a BA in English with experience as a writing tutor for both native and non-native English speakers. I understand it takes 2 years to qualify and that I could separate the 2 years, doing an MA in English Language and Culture first. Doing that I could spend the year working on my Dutch as well. We were thinking of moving to Groningen as most of the family is there.

Can anyone offer advice on here? I know there is a teacher shortage there, but I believe you have to have Dutch to teach at a state school. As for the international schools, I would need to have 2-3 years of teaching experience.

Also, is it possible to teach without certification and work towards certification whilst working?

Any help in regards to this will be much appreciated. As far as universities go, I was looking at Groningen, Leiden, Amsterdam and Nijmegen.

Hope someone can help. Thanks in advance.
:clap2:

Good day

I saw your comment on your move to the Nederland’s. Something that you have mentioned was that you will be going on a partner visa, giving you the same rights as a Dutch citizen. Can I ask you to please elaborate on this issue? I will tell you why. My wife is a Dutch born South African. And we want to go back to the Nederland’s in October this year. I have to under go a civic integration exam. To apply for a MVV. But if I can follow the same way, why not???? I which you all the best with your move and if you are in the Nederland’s already, grate and I hope to hear from you soon.

Rg C.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply; however, this move is being postponed for at least 3 years as my partner has decided to complete a Masters in England beginning in 2011, so I'll be completing my PGCE in London, teaching for 2 years after that and completing a masters. After all that, then we hope to make the move to NL, as we both really wish to live there.

Anyway, as for EU/EEA route, you would have to reside with your Dutch partner in another EU/EEA member state for at least 6 months. If you have previously resided in any of the EU/EEA member states and resided together, then you may apply through EU law. If not, then you have to apply via National law.

I'm exempt either way from the integration exams as an American (there are several other nationalities exempt too), so I wasn't affected by that. However, if I improve my Dutch, which I plan too, I think I would be able to pass it.

I don't know the full details, nor do I know if you would receive a decision in time, but if you have been married for 3 years you may be eligible to apply for naturalisation, even from abroad, but you would have to contact the embassy or IND for more details. This what is says on the IND website:
"You are married to or are the registered partner of a Dutch man or woman. If this is the case, you can submit an application for naturalisation after 3 years of marriage or registered partnership (possibly abroad) and uninterrupted cohabitation."
You would need the following documents:
"a valid passport, a valid residence permit for a non-temporary purpose [this is the confusing part as there is an option to apply from abroad, although you may have had to live in NL at some point], a legalised birth certificate, where applicable a legalised marriage certificate, a civic integration examination diploma or a comparable diploma."

Best of luck!
 

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Thanks for the reply; however, this move is being postponed for at least 3 years as my partner has decided to complete a Masters in England beginning in 2011, so I'll be completing my PGCE in London, teaching for 2 years after that and completing a masters. After all that, then we hope to make the move to NL, as we both really wish to live there.

Anyway, as for EU/EEA route, you would have to reside with your Dutch partner in another EU/EEA member state for at least 6 months. If you have previously resided in any of the EU/EEA member states and resided together, then you may apply through EU law. If not, then you have to apply via National law.

I'm exempt either way from the integration exams as an American (there are several other nationalities exempt too), so I wasn't affected by that. However, if I improve my Dutch, which I plan too, I think I would be able to pass it.

I don't know the full details, nor do I know if you would receive a decision in time, but if you have been married for 3 years you may be eligible to apply for naturalisation, even from abroad, but you would have to contact the embassy or IND for more details. This what is says on the IND website:
"You are married to or are the registered partner of a Dutch man or woman. If this is the case, you can submit an application for naturalisation after 3 years of marriage or registered partnership (possibly abroad) and uninterrupted cohabitation."
You would need the following documents:
"a valid passport, a valid residence permit for a non-temporary purpose [this is the confusing part as there is an option to apply from abroad, although you may have had to live in NL at some point], a legalised birth certificate, where applicable a legalised marriage certificate, a civic integration examination diploma or a comparable diploma."

Best of luck!
:confused:

Thanks for the reply. Mmmmm what can I say. To get info from the embassy in South Africa is like talking to a brick wall. We have lived for a period of 6 months in Azerbaijan which is a non EU country, but that still gives me 6 months out of my home country. We have been married for 9 years so that wound be a problem. As for the CI exam. I will do that is 6 weeks when I return back to S.A. from work.

I thank you for your time and help. Hope it goes well with you studies in the UK.

Rg
C
:)
 

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:confused:

Thanks for the reply. Mmmmm what can I say. To get info from the embassy in South Africa is like talking to a brick wall. We have lived for a period of 6 months in Azerbaijan which is a non EU country, but that still gives me 6 months out of my home country. We have been married for 9 years so that wound be a problem. As for the CI exam. I will do that is 6 weeks when I return back to S.A. from work.

I thank you for your time and help. Hope it goes well with you studies in the UK.

Rg
C
:)
:ranger:

Good Morning,

I have been thinking, you mentioned that you are a teacher. Can you give me som info on the Dutch schooling system? Please. If you can?
I have 3 children one 8 years and in grade 2 by S.A. standards, one of 5 years old will be going to grade R, pre school by S.A. standards and one of 3 years old not in school.

What do I need to bring along with to there new school?

What is the cost of schools in the Nederland’s?

We are looking at Almelo area.

I know it’s a lot of questions and I will understand if you can answer them. Thanks for your time and help.

Rg
C.
 

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to and teaching in the Netherlands

If you're accustomed to the ways of the American Midwest, and/or you think like your fellow midwesterners, you're in for a culture shock all right. It's not necessesarily a bad thing, you're just going to see a society of people who have different views and different priorities.

I don't know how the student visa works, so I'm just going to give you advice on other things. First, learn the language, if you haven't already. Most people in Western Europe speak English, but you'll get a lot more respect if you speak to people there in Dutch. Western Europeans tend to view Americans as lazy and unwilling to respect other countries' cultures, so this will help show them that we're not all that way. I know from experience; in Austria, before I learned German, I would get a lot of people who would become rude when I spoke to them in my American English accent.

Second, be prepared to lose some money upon currency exchange, the Euro is worth more than the USD.

Third, be sure you're doing this for YOU and not your boyfriend. It's perfectly fine to want to spend time with him, but you should never have to go anywhere you don't want to go for another person.

Good luck to you, you're going to love Europe and will probably never want to come back. I certainly count the days until I can go there again.
________________________
 

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Teaching in the Netherlands

Hi,

My wife and I are from Long Island, NY and we are hoping to live and work in the Netherlands. I have been teaching in the NYC school system for 12 years (Special Education). I have a Bachelors degree in International Studies, and a Masters degree in Educational Administration. My wife has a Bachelor's degree in Architecture and she's in the middle of a AutoCad certification course. We have two children, ages 2 & 4. We are at the very start of our journey and would appreciate any advice you might have, especially regarding jobs, and visas. As I mentioned, we really are at the VERY start of this process. Thank-you for any advice/information you might have, and have a nice day.

Patrick
 

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New Career in Teaching in the Netherlands

Hi,
I have recently moved to Amsterdam due to my husband's work and am looking to start a new career in teaching. I do not have a teaching qualification nor have I taught before. My background is in Engineering, I have a Master's in Chemical Engineering and have worked in the UK prior to moving here.

I wanted advice on how I could get into teaching here. I have looked at some teaching training course and it seems that I will have to speak fluent dutch (which I do not) to work at most schools here. Is this true? Would it be advisable that I do the PGCE teaching qualification (possibly online) or would it not prove beneficial as I do not know dutch?
While deciding on what qualification I should go for, would I be able to get teaching "work experience" in english speaking schools here?

I would appreciate any advice in relation to this matter. Thank you in advance for your help and time.
 
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