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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I lived in America up until I was 24 years old. So... last year. I'm 25 years old and living in Australia with my current boyfriend of 5 years. I just recently applied for a Partner Visa that allows me to stay here (without marrying him as long as I continue living with him) for as long as we're together.

Now... we're talking a lot about the future lately, and I have aging parents who I am constantly worrying about. We seem to have less and less ties in Australia, other than the fact that financially, we'll be a lot more stable.

I was thinking about moving home, and living with my parents and bringing him along with me until we figure something out.

We would not be doing this until we've got some money saved up behind us so we could stop ourselves from being too much of a burden on them.

We are not currently engaged, but that's really an issue of getting our other affairs in order first. I have to get my visa, we need some money for settling in, etc.

Now...

TL;DR

If I get my Australian citizenship (or permanent residency, I'm not 100% sure which I'd be or the correct terminology), and want to move back to America (because I'm allowed dual-citizenship)... can I apply to move him to America while I'm still living in Australia?

I know I can apply to bring him to America if I'm still living there, but there's nothing on the USCIS website that says ANYTHING about applying for him to come over to America to marry me whilst I'm in Australia.

This is getting long and garbled, I hope I'm making sense.

Any advice on who to ask or anyone know the answers to this question?
 

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I lived in America up until I was 24 years old. So... last year. I'm 25 years old and living in Australia with my current boyfriend of 5 years. I just recently applied for a Partner Visa that allows me to stay here (without marrying him as long as I continue living with him) for as long as we're together.

Now... we're talking a lot about the future lately, and I have aging parents who I am constantly worrying about. We seem to have less and less ties in Australia, other than the fact that financially, we'll be a lot more stable.

I was thinking about moving home, and living with my parents and bringing him along with me until we figure something out.

We would not be doing this until we've got some money saved up behind us so we could stop ourselves from being too much of a burden on them.

We are not currently engaged, but that's really an issue of getting our other affairs in order first. I have to get my visa, we need some money for settling in, etc.

Now...

TL;DR

If I get my Australian citizenship (or permanent residency, I'm not 100% sure which I'd be or the correct terminology), and want to move back to America (because I'm allowed dual-citizenship)... can I apply to move him to America while I'm still living in Australia?

I know I can apply to bring him to America if I'm still living there, but there's nothing on the USCIS website that says ANYTHING about applying for him to come over to America to marry me whilst I'm in Australia.

This is getting long and garbled, I hope I'm making sense.

Any advice on who to ask or anyone know the answers to this question?
The U.S. does not mind if one of its expat citizens, travels to the States to marry a foreigner and then returns to their foreign residence WITH the foreign partner.

If a U.S. citizen wants to travel to the U.S. with the intent of marrying a foreigner and then residing in the U.S., then the foreigner should get an appropriate type of visa, such as a fiance' visa.
(I am not an expert on this matter and have not taken my foreign wife to the U.S. to reside.)

I think a U.S. Embassy in Australia might provide more and better information on this matter.
 

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OK, the US doesn't really care whether you're "engaged" or not, nor how long you have been living together. If you want him to come with you on your return to the States, you either need to be married or to be prepared to get married within 90 days of his arrival in the US.

The tricky bit is that whether you go the spouse visa route or the fiancé visa route, you need to be able to sponsor your spouse on arrival, which means you need to have a source of income in the US and a place for you both to live. You can use a co-sponsor - usually a family member with adequate income to cover you both in addition to the co-sponsor's immediate family.

And generally speaking, getting the appropriate spouse or fiancé visa takes a good six months or more to process. Immigrant Visa for a Spouse or Fiancé(e) of a U.S. Citizen
Cheers,
Bev
 

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K1 fiancé
Petition gets filed, AUS stays in AUS until petition is granted, moves to the U.S., gets married within 90 days, files Adjustment of Status, can work when AoS is granted, travel outside the U.S. while AoS is pending requires approved parole papers.

CR1 spouse
Get married wherever you want, AUS returns to AUS and waits until petition is approved, goes through medical and interview, moves to the U.S. once Green Card is approved, can work immediately

It looks like current processing times run between 9-12 months from soup to nuts right now if there are no issues.

Everything is in detail including fees on uscis.gov
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the answers! It's been a big help. I was particularly wondering about processing times as well, but I figured I could get those answers when I visit my family in the states next month. I'll just call them up and ask my questions.

The main concern is our ability to remain together through all that. (As in physically together.)

I need to make sure that if there's gonna be 9-12 months processing before he can come over to America, that I'm still fine to stay in Australia with him until he's able to get over there as well. I'd have a source of income and my parents would probably be our supplemental income until we get ourselves completely settled. My parents own an apartment attached to their home and are overly-helpful.

But regardless, these answers make it all seem very simple. (In comparison to me getting my visa in Australia. Trust me. That headache is neverending. And nearly $10,000 after all the plane tickets/visa fees/printer ink and paper/ blah blah blah.)
 
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