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What is the most developed city in Mexico, where it's loosely similar to a normal U.S. city. Every road is paved, road signals that work, just an normal developed feeling.
 

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What is the most developed city in Mexico, where it's loosely similar to a normal U.S. city. Every road is paved, road signals that work, just an normal developed feeling.
"Normal developed feeling?" Lol...maybe you haven't looked around lately, but with just about every normal American city going through a huge financial crunch, things nowadays aren't as normal as they used to be. Yes, the streets and highways are paved...and many of them are also badly pot-holed. Street signals don't always work. Schools are badly run down. Storefronts are empty. Homeless people and panhandlers are ubiquitous. Crazy people stalk the streets becuase no one will be responsible for them. There's lots of road rage. Incivility is commonplace. Etc. etc.

That's the new normal.
 

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McAllen, Texas. Close enough to Mexico, but still in the USA.
 
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The Santa Fe area of Mexico City would put most US or world cities to shame. Live in a residential tower, pay 20,000 a month or more for rent, and never have to leave the area for the rest of the Ciudad de Mexico. Everything's beautiful and perfect. For the living costs, you could live in Scottsdale instead.

Truman Burbank would be proud to live there. (even though it's all built on top of MX City's old dump).





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The Santa Fe area of Mexico City would put most US or world cities to shame. Live in a residential tower, pay 20,000 a month or more for rent, and never have to leave the area for the rest of the Ciudad de Mexico. Everything's beautiful and perfect. For the living costs, you could live in Scottsdale instead.

Truman Burbank would be proud to live there. (even though it's all built on top of MX City's old dump).
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Whenever I think of Santa Fe, I shudder, and not because it was built on top of a huge garbage dump. That's where wealthy Mexicans live who want to isolate themselves as much as possible from the rest of their fellow citizens. It's all gated communities and a gigantic mall, and you need a car if you want to step outside its hallowed precincts. Mexicans I know here shudder at the thought of having to travel there for work, and companies located in Santa Fe that want English teachers to come there to give classes often have trouble finding anyone who's willing to shlep out there to teach.
 

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"Normal developed feeling?" Lol...maybe you haven't looked around lately, but with just about every normal American city going through a huge financial crunch, things nowadays aren't as normal as they used to be. Yes, the streets and highways are paved...and many of them are also badly pot-holed. Street signals don't always work. Schools are badly run down. Storefronts are empty. Homeless people and panhandlers are ubiquitous. Crazy people stalk the streets becuase no one will be responsible for them. There's lots of road rage. Incivility is commonplace. Etc. etc.

That's the new normal.
+1

My daughter, who lives in Italy, was home for an extended period last summer, after not having been here for a bit.

She was shocked at the poor condition of the roads.

Gotta keep the tax rates low on the top 0.1%, and the corporations that haven't been laying people off in order to offshore, or anything.:rolleyes:
 

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What is the most developed city in Mexico, where it's loosely similar to a normal U.S. city. Every road is paved, road signals that work, just an normal developed feeling.
:laugh::laugh:

Oh wait, you're serious right? :D

All kidding aside, the cities I have seen in Mexico and in the US are vastly different. My most recent experience is with Guadalajara and the roads are paved, mostly, the signals work, mostly, unless there was an earthquake or power outage in the previous hour, or the Governor is passing through in his helicopter, and after you live in Mx a while you understand what passes for "normal". Sort of. But the normal here is vastly different from the "normal" in the excited states.

You can find a McD's or Burger King, Starbucks, Gap, Costco etc in Guad but why would you want to? I second the MacAllan comment.
 

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I've been in many cities with paved roads and traffic signals.
One city that reminded me of the USA was Guanajuato, many neighborhoods appeared similar to many in Southern California where I grew up.
 

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Excluding the tourist areas like Cancun . My vote is Monterrey . It looks like a U.S city with the chain stores and malls and the streets seemed to be filled with newer cars . I believe it also has the highest income per capita of Mexico.
 

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Excluding the tourist areas like Cancun . My vote is Monterrey . It looks like a U.S city with the chain stores and malls and the streets seemed to be filled with newer cars . I believe it also has the highest income per capita of Mexico.
But why would someone move to Mexico to a city that's just like the US? Makes no sense to me:confused:.
 

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I believe that Mexacali is the highest per capata city in mexico. It has the most middle
class people in Mexico per population. It has a great many malls and shopping areas.
It also has a lot of traffic.

It is also on the border with the USA and this makes for good shopping for the things
you can not get in Mexico.

This is good for people on medicare and need their care. Plus you can get a lot of
your medication here for abort the same price that you can in the USA for about for
the same price you can with your insurance.

Many people come across the border into Mexico for the theaters and places to eat.

I fell the worst crimes here theft at home or from your car. Not much in the way
of vilent crime.

It is a short driving distance from here to any kind of attraction you would like in
the USA or Mexico. The beaches on the sea or the pacific. Six hours to the grand
canyon or Ensanada Mexico. We like San Felipe Baja and have a house there,
We spend weekends there and will do more when the wife retires.

I know Alan had lived here for years and maybe he can add something.
 

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I'm now tending to think Mexicali's middle class is mostly lower middle class compared to the long time established industrial city of San Luis Potosi. There are so many extra large houses on the west end of town that I still can not believe it. Their salons put Mexicali salons to shame in classy style and number, very nice. Their funeral homes are classy compared to Mexicali's also etc. Their roads are no were near as good as Mexicali's though. Graffitti is everywhere in the east end of town, which in Mexicali is under control. Their buses and bus service puts Mexicali's buses to shame also. I have to wonder why a newer Mexicali bus has the windows down sometimes when it is over 100 in the shade, can't they afford to repair the AC? Even some taxis do this.

I made friends with a Mexicali policeman and we would meet for breakfast at a very great burrito stand. He told me the transient and homeless are given one change to take a bus ticket to TJ and if they showed up again it would get ugly. SLP is full of them.
 

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Living in Baltimore I am glad to hear that most cities in Mexico may not be as developed as mine.

Last year, our developed city had 172 murders, the main downtown drag was torn up to make accommodation for the Grand Prix most of the year, the water mains have been breaking on a regular basis for many years, drivers are the same as anywhere, and the a good part of the city looks like Germany after WWII. There are "food deserts" all over the town, where good food and supermarkets of any size do not exist; where gangs control the streets. The response time for non-shooting crimes by the police is glacial, and the city is run by a group of 1%ers who still think they live in the 1950-60's where people "knew their place" and everyone wanted to come to downtown to shop. If you want to build a hotel for your own profit, you don't have to use only your money, the city will build it for you, take a 20 year tax break and take the loss. Where the city schools are crumbling, yet at the headquarters of the Board of Education, they spend $250,000 to renovate one office.

You see, Baltimore is a city that it's "leaders" think is a small town, and they like it that way.

If this is civilized...then from what I've heard, read and seen on Mexico...I'll take Guadalajara, where the streets are clean, the traffic is not all that bad (from what I've seen) and the merchants don't seem to be scared to open their shops and stores to the street.

Question to the OP: If you choose to move to Mexico are you looking for a duplicate of where you are now or are you ready to realize that you will be moving to a place that is different. And if different is not what you want, is it worth all the hassle, the re-acculturation, to move yourself and your family? I hope so, Mexico is a marvelous place, there is so much more going for it than it seems going against it.

There can be no apples to apples comparison, as the bushels they are in are very, very different. The definition of "developed" can only be relevant within the paradigm it is viewed.
 
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