Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

This question may seem a little bizarre, but I'd like to have your opinion on it. I've been considering moving from Canada to Southern France and why not go for a sunny warm place. I am targeting a few places: Toulouse, Perpignan, Montpellier, Aix/Marseille and maybe Nice (I guess this one is too pricey). In my research in several forums I found many complaints about the wind (either Mistral or Tramontane for example). Is it really that bad? Montreal is cold and it can get windy, but it's not super windy; but Southern France seems to be very windy and that can affect the temperature and maybe the "promenades" outdoors. Is this really an issue? Will it pourrir ma vie over there? What are some areas in the South that are more protected? Of course, I have to give the employment issue a lot more consideration, but I was really surprise to see so many negative comments on that. Could anybody share their experience? Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,902 Posts
Here in the mountains 1 hour from Perpignan the Tramontane can be horrible. It winter it cuts through clothing like a knife. The locals here just don't go out in it. In summer it's a nuisance.

We've been here 4 years and we have learnt to live with it. Certainly no gardening when it blows and I have a sheltered mountain path for walking the dogs. One learns to adapt. Don't try to fight Nature - you will lose!

Narbonne is reputed to be windiest city in France.

Sorry, no experience of the mistral.

Try WikiP in French - there are good articles on both winds - shorter in English.

DejW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
The mistral in the Bouches du Rhone is a real howler (beyhond belief) and it brings torrential rain of the kind I have never seen in England. However, it wouldn't put me off living there. Best.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
The mistral in the Bouches du Rhone is a real howler (beyhond belief) and it brings torrential rain of the kind I have never seen in England. However, it wouldn't put me off living there. Best.
It doesn't always bring rain, depends on the direction from which it's blowing. In fact, it's known as a dry wind and supposed to be healthy.

Both winds frequently reach 100 km per hour and more. Both can very suddenly turn a hot day into a cool one, and a cool day into a bitterly cold one.

For me the issue is the sudden drop in temperature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,902 Posts
I haven't noticed the sudden drop in temp - but people tell me I'm thick skinned and insensitive.

DejW

It doesn't always bring rain, depends on the direction from which it's blowing. In fact, it's known as a dry wind and supposed to be healthy.

Both winds frequently reach 100 km per hour and more. Both can very suddenly turn a hot day into a cool one, and a cool day into a bitterly cold one.

For me the issue is the sudden drop in temperature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
Wenkroy said:
Hello, This question may seem a little bizarre, but I'd like to have your opinion on it. I've been considering moving from Canada to Southern France and why not go for a sunny warm place. I am targeting a few places: Toulouse, Perpignan, Montpellier, Aix/Marseille and maybe Nice (I guess this one is too pricey). In my research in several forums I found many complaints about the wind (either Mistral or Tramontane for example). Is it really that bad? Montreal is cold and it can get windy, but it's not super windy; but Southern France seems to be very windy and that can affect the temperature and maybe the "promenades" outdoors. Is this really an issue? Will it pourrir ma vie over there? What are some areas in the South that are more protected? Of course, I have to give the employment issue a lot more consideration, but I was really surprise to see so many negative comments on that. Could anybody share their experience? Thanks!
Nice is rather protected from mistral. Actually there isn't much wind in the Nice area.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
I haven't noticed the sudden drop in temp - but people tell me I'm thick skinned and insensitive.

DejW
Ah, but I'm very sensitive to drops in temperature - sets off my asthma unfortunately. I have cousins and friends who live in the areas around Marseille who also really notice the fall in temperature (and complain about it) when the Mistral strikes. The solution, of course, is to keep an eye on the weather forecasts and in the warmer months when the Mistral is predicted have a lightweight, windproof jacket or cardi, and a scarf, with you. But it's not like the Mistral blows every day :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
737 Posts
I had in mind to move to the region you described , but the frequency of these winds when I stayed there spoiled it for me , drove me crazy
I didn't find out until afterwards that this region has the highest suicide rate in europe , not hard to work out why !

strangely enough in december I drove from beziers to perpignan ...and there was no more than a breeze , never happened to me before in 30 years !

however more than paid for it when I came back at the end of march , my fuel consumption went up by 30 % !!!
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
How often does it blow? Seasonal or throughout the year?
Google Mistral in French to see what gives rise to it. In these days of climate change meteorological conditions are constantly changing, but I can say that it can blow at any time of the year.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
Hello,

This question may seem a little bizarre, but I'd like to have your opinion on it. I've been considering moving from Canada to Southern France and why not go for a sunny warm place. I am targeting a few places: Toulouse, Perpignan, Montpellier, Aix/Marseille and maybe Nice (I guess this one is too pricey). In my research in several forums I found many complaints about the wind (either Mistral or Tramontane for example). Is it really that bad? Montreal is cold and it can get windy, but it's not super windy; but Southern France seems to be very windy and that can affect the temperature and maybe the "promenades" outdoors. Is this really an issue? Will it pourrir ma vie over there? What are some areas in the South that are more protected? Of course, I have to give the employment issue a lot more consideration, but I was really surprise to see so many negative comments on that. Could anybody share their experience? Thanks!
These winds frequently blow at in excess of 100 km per hour, or more. I guess it all depends what you consider to be a strong wind - they are neither a hurricane nor a cyclone though :D Generally people who live in affected regions just learn to live with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
I'm no expert but I think the Mistral is the worst. In the past, if the Mistral blew continuously for a specified number of days, it would be used to explain the commission of a crime. It was used as an excuse for 'temporary insanity' in murder trials apparently. Farm houses were sometimes built diagonally to the direction of the wind so that a corner pointed into the wind. Apparently this helped with wind noise and wind penetration into the house.
Have a look here -
The weather in Provence can be crazy
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
I'm no expert but I think the Mistral is the worst. In the past, if the Mistral blew continuously for a specified number of days, it would be used to explain the commission of a crime. It was used as an excuse for 'temporary insanity' in murder trials apparently. Farm houses were sometimes built diagonally to the direction of the wind so that a corner pointed into the wind. Apparently this helped with wind noise and wind penetration into the house.
Have a look here -
The weather in Provence can be crazy
My parents lived in Marseille in the 1940s - Mum loved it there but said the Mistral drove her crazy. Or was that an excuse? :D
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top