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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where to start....... well, I was born in California and lived here most of my life, but spent summers in Guadalajara (well Tlaquepaque). Currently I've grown pretty fed up with the hamster wheel I seem to be stuck in and the high cost of living of California and I am seriously considering moving to Tlaquepaque. My parents have homes where I can live free of charge and I am eligible to obtain double citizenship, I am a college grad (psychology major), and speak both English and Spanish (female 25yrs old). Realistically what kind of jobs can I obtain and how much income do I need to bring in to be able to live comfortably?
 

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There isn't a lot of jobs in psychology in Mexico, but the fact that you studied in the states might give you an edge. It depends on which school you went to and where you apply.

You could always try to go into teaching though.
 

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It isn't what you can expect, but what you can desire. I was a broke out of work American, without the dual citizenship plus that you have. I also wanted off the wheel. As you do I had a place to live here free of charge(thanks, mom). So, I chucked it all, moved here 20 years ago and just started looking. To my great fortune I found a stable job a great wife and a place I love.
 

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There isn't a lot of jobs in psychology in Mexico, but the fact that you studied in the states might give you an edge. It depends on which school you went to and where you apply.

You could always try to go into teaching though.
Actually I feel there is a demand for psychologists equal to Canada or the US in Mexico.

I was wondering why you think there might not be. My sister in law is a psychiatrist and tells me things about her profession in Mexico sometimes.

There are people in every country with a need that would involve the mental health professions, I would imagine.

Teaching and nursing here are two of the lower paid professions, especially compared to Canada and the US.

My sister in law does very well financially. Excellent in fact.
 

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Work in Medicne

Where to start....... well, I was born in California and lived here most of my life, but spent summers in Guadalajara (well Tlaquepaque). Currently I've grown pretty fed up with the hamster wheel I seem to be stuck in and the high cost of living of California and I am seriously considering moving to Tlaquepaque. My parents have homes where I can live free of charge and I am eligible to obtain double citizenship, I am a college grad (psychology major), and speak both English and Spanish (female 25yrs old). Realistically what kind of jobs can I obtain and how much income do I need to bring in to be able to live comfortably?
I feel you will have a few months or longer to get into a situation were a job might present itself, but networking in Mexico is very well established and people seem very helpful, at times, when socializing and in a sincere way. Best of luck to you. Being from the background that you describe makes me feel you will have a wonderful time here, especially since you seem motivated. I have never lived in Guadalajara but if it is anything like the city of San Luis Potosi the social life will be wonderful. That is a big plus living in Mexico.
 

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Psychology majors also can find work in other areas, like the human resource department of large multinationals. Along with your English and Spanish you would be a good candidate for that position. Jobs are to be had here, but it takes time to find one. Be prepared to be denied work and to turn down offers that are not to your liking.
 

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Would expect a lot will depend on your focus with psychology and level of degree.
Would expect that at 25 is very tight for a PhD but you could be very mart or newly "minted". My daughter is a pediatric neural psychologist with a pretty balanced mix of clinic patients and research. In her case, the target would certainly be the leading children's hospitals(she is now at St. Jude's in Memphis) and would expect such a facility in Guadalajara.
Picking up on earlier post, another good approach would be to research multinational corporations in Guadalajara as you would bring an interesting combination of benefits. You are really an expat but in a position to trade off some key benefits that companies need pay if a person on temporary assignment. Not sure about Mexico but when I was on temporary assignment and tax assistance included my taxable income was about 5 times my US salary.
That would give you a lot of negotiation leeway.
 

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Jhoana, while I can't specifically comment on your professional life here, I would definitely encourage you to make the move for all the other parts of our life. I also think it will take some time to get in the groove but your language skills and dual citizenship are big pluses and if you're smart and a go-getter I believe you will land a good job, do very well here, and enjoy a high level quality of life.

I live about an hour south of Guad and have friends in your age group that love living there. There is a very active social life to be had, lots of outdoor sports to get involved in, and many young smart educated people to hang with. Of course, there are a few things that aren't warm and fuzzy about living in Guad, but nothing is perfect. I say. . .go for it!
 
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If you're smart, you won't work for someone else, you'll work for you. Don't wimp out and become someone's full-time employee/slave. You'll wake up one day in 40 years and realize you blew your life on yet another hamster wheel in a different place.

You can probably rent or "borrow" a room or somewhere private for sessions from an existing therapist or in a clinic that is well located on a percentage basis i.e. if you charge 500 pesos for a visit, your host gets 100 of that. OR make house calls and do the sessions in your client's homes - the transport cost getting there will replace the rent for a space.

Find somewhere close to where you will live so you aren't eaten up with transport costs, unless your housing is not a great area. Poor people won't spend 100 pesos on a dentist once a year so they probably wouldn't spend 500 a visit for their issues.

Business cards, a cell phone, and lots of networking that doesn't cost much upfront. Target English speaking foreigners that need help - there are probably enough in Guad to create your own niche and they'll probably feel more comfortable talking in their native language.

You probably won't make a lot in the beginning, but in time you will gain clientele. Leverage your English skills, don't charge too little for your time, and when you're not with a client, be looking for ways to gain other clients instead of wasting that gift of time.

Check with the local hospitals or government agencies that deal with mental health issues. Many medical people take a part time job for 2-4 hours a day to pick up their grocery money and run their own consultorio elsewhere where they make much more. In the beginning of your time here, it would help. Good luck !


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Right. On. GringoCarlos! Absolutely agree with that being the best way to go about this.

Here in the Lake Chapala area, I only know of a couple of people working in the mental health field, one a Mexican doctor and the other a female expat. Both have thriving practices.

I'm peripherally involved in the medical community here and my understanding is there is precious little in the way of mental health help around.

Suerte!
 

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Actually I feel there is a demand for psychologists equal to Canada or the US in Mexico.
People in Mexico are less likely to go see a psychologist or psychiatrist.

There are people in every country with a need that would involve the mental health professions, I would imagine.
Sure, people have the same basic human needs, that doesn't mean they meet them though.

I was wondering why you think there might not be. My sister in law is a psychiatrist and tells me things about her profession in Mexico sometimes.
Just like in the US, the job market is not that great, specially for people with psychology degrees. There is a lot of unemployed and underemployed graduates in either side of the border.

Teaching and nursing here are two of the lower paid professions, especially compared to Canada and the US.
Almost all (if not all) jobs in Mexico pay lower than in Canada and the US, but any job is better than no job when you're trying to make money. Besides, not all teachers have it that bad.
 

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Well, I suppose you could find work in, marketing, Sales, teaching, call center, or human resources, and while doing that you should try to get a masters and your Certificate (celula profesional) to actually treat patients.

A bachelor's BA in Psychology from CSU or UC systems does not qualify you for treating patients. Of course you already know that!... but somebody suggested that, however, that could be your long term goal. I'm thinking that you want solutions for short term while you figure out things and all. Try going to indeed(.)com and search for jobs in Gdl and apply from the U.S. to jobs that are non-technical for American companies..

I know 2 friends who did that and got jobs. one was an engineer (so it was easy for him) and other was sociology and psych major...

tip.. Bank of America is in Tlaquepaque...(go online)

good luck.

with NO rent, you are already ahead most. Plus you could rent rooms to roomates and pay bills with that too...
 

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Almost all (if not all) jobs in Mexico pay lower than in Canada and the US, but any job is better than no job when you're trying to make money. Besides, not all teachers have it that bad.
Teaching and nursing are professional type jobs in Canada and the US as would be law enforcement, but in Mexico those jobs pay very little compared to Canada and the US and other professional type jobs in Mexico itself. They are not even close to paying what they get NOB in "respects" to most other professions. In other words NOB the pay is OK for them, here it is very low.
 

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All sounds pretty good but a think you' all are way ahead of your interference.
I suspect that she has an undergrad BA/BS in Psychology, not a PhD and little if any clinical experience other than maybe as an intern.
I suspect that it would be very difficult to compete independently in the mental health field.
Even in Mexico there must be licensing associations that would prevent what you suggest.
I think that she needs think broader. Transitioning with a large company to get a sustainable basis upon which to look at options is certainly a viable choice.
 

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That is exactly what I was thinking. Yes, she would need to be licensed to practice here.

If she is currently in Silicon Valley, or anywhere close, maybe a job could be landed there with the idea of a transfer to Mexico's Silicon Valley,Guadalajara. Flextronics, Jabil, SCI and HP all come to mind.
 

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That is exactly what I was thinking. Yes, she would need to be licensed to practice here.

If she is currently in Silicon Valley, or anywhere close, maybe a job could be landed there with the idea of a transfer to Mexico's Silicon Valley,Guadalajara. Flextronics, Jabil, SCI and HP all come to mind.
We have heard nothing from the OP for a while.

What does she think of this outpouring of (sometimes conflicting) information?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hi. Sorry for taking so long to get back on here.. Thanks for the input. I've actually made my decision and I will be moving to Mexico at the end of august. To answer your questions regarding my education level, I actually only have a bachelors in psychology so I know starting a practice is currently not an option, at least legally. My current job title in the states is autism behavior interventionist, but after doing some reseach i really havent found many openings for similar positions in guadalajara. For now I decided to apply to language schools and in the future I hope to open either my own little language center or a "jamba juice" type of place. Wish me luck ;)
 

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Hi. Sorry for taking so long to get back on here.. Thanks for the input. I've actually made my decision and I will be moving to Mexico at the end of august. To answer your questions regarding my education level, I actually only have a bachelors in psychology so I know starting a practice is currently not an option, at least legally. My current job title in the states is autism behavior interventionist, but after doing some reseach i really havent found many openings for similar positions in guadalajara. For now I decided to apply to language schools and in the future I hope to open either my own little language center or a "jamba juice" type of place. Wish me luck ;)
Buena suerte! You'll find a lot of stuff here on the forum about starting businesses, job opportunities etc. Use the search function.
 
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