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I was there for three weeks last winter. I had a kitchen, so I'd wake up to some new interesting coffee just bought in yesterday's outing. Then I'd walk down to the square in Jocotepec to buy the fruits and veggies for the day.
Some days you have Internet, some days not. I walked a lot, street festivals everywhere. But basically you do whatever you want!
 

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I was there for three weeks last winter. I had a kitchen, so I'd wake up to some new interesting coffee just bought in yesterday's outing. Then I'd walk down to the square in Jocotepec to buy the fruits and veggies for the day.
Some days you have Internet, some days not. I walked a lot, street festivals everywhere. But basically you do whatever you want!
I'm sure that Jocotepec is a lovely place to live, but the OP wants to move to Merida.
 

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There is a lot more to do in Merida tha in Joco and the temperature is a whole lot less comfortable in Merida as well.. Take the Joco list and add to it.. What does anyone who is retired doo anywhere.. Merida after a while is not that different.
 

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Just wondering what retired expats living in Merida do? What is a typical day like? THX


This looks like something I might do.....

6:30AM- Wake up and take a cold shower.
7:00AM- Breakfast of Ice coffee & cold cereal.
8:00AM- Jump in pool to cool off.
12:00-- Lunch of limeade & green salad.
1:00PM- Jump back in the pool.
3:00PM- Take a siesta under ceiling fan on high.
5:00PM- Diner of Ice tea & shrimp cocktail.
6:00PM- Nap naked under fan on high.
9:00PM- wake up, get ready to go out.
9:30PM- Leave house and go dancing till midnight...
 

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Merida is amazing! Beautiful, safe, clean, yummy and friendly. There is so much to do: galleries, opera, concerts, ballet, free public concerts in the plazas with dancing, a religious celebration each day of the year, wonderful food of all kinds not just Yucatecan, good public transport, the beach is relatively close, about 200+ archeological ruins within an hour of the city to explore, the Maya language is alive and well, shopping is great from designer, custom made or off the rack, great shopping centers (one with ice skating), great schools, luxury theaters have been offering electric leather easy chairs with waiter service and drinks for over 10 years and show American films and more, the "White City" couldn't be more welcoming, really (we lived there for 5 years), you can drive to the coast and see the lagoon with flamingos, eat seafood on the seashore, Happy Hour is great.... and while the summer is pretty hot and humid, winter is glorious... Once you are there, check out Merida English Library in the Santiago area, meet more expats and join in....
 

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and while the summer is pretty hot and humid, winter is glorious... ..
In my experience the weather is horribly hot and humid most of the year, not just in the summer. I recall spending some time in Merida in January, and except for the early morning and evening, it was quite hot and humid. Maybe the weather patterns have changed since then;) .
 

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Merida is amazing! Beautiful, safe, clean, yummy and friendly. There is so much to do: galleries, opera, concerts, ballet, free public concerts in the plazas with dancing, a religious celebration each day of the year, wonderful food of all kinds not just Yucatecan, good public transport, the beach is relatively close, about 200+ archeological ruins within an hour of the city to explore, the Maya language is alive and well, shopping is great from designer, custom made or off the rack, great shopping centers (one with ice skating), great schools, luxury theaters have been offering electric leather easy chairs with waiter service and drinks for over 10 years and show American films and more, the "White City" couldn't be more welcoming, really (we lived there for 5 years), you can drive to the coast and see the lagoon with flamingos, eat seafood on the seashore, Happy Hour is great.... and while the summer is pretty hot and humid, winter is glorious... Once you are there, check out Merida English Library in the Santiago area, meet more expats and join in....
I hear about the weather and it discourages me.
How much cooler is the beach?
What beach towns did you visit?
Did you visit Sisal? Telchac?
Do you still live there?

If I buy a place on the coast, I'm thinking I could rent out my place to people from Merida if it gets too hot. I have places to stay in Smogcito City (CDMX) or Morelos in the summer.

I'm also going to check out San Cristóbal, but I'm thinking a beach house within 40 minutes of an international airport would be the way to go if I want to persuade friends and family to visit.





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I'm also going to check out San Cristóbal, but I'm thinking a beach house within 40 minutes of an international airport would be the way to go if I want to persuade friends and family to visit. ...
That's a good idea. I thought about living near the beach for that reason, but decided it made no sense to live somewhere for the one or two weeks a year when someone might visit. However, having a second home near the beach might be worth considering. The question is it worth the hassle of having and, of course, the cost.
 

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That's a good idea. I thought about living near the beach for that reason, but decided it made no sense to live somewhere for the one or two weeks a year when someone might visit. However, having a second home near the beach might be worth considering. The question is it worth the hassle of having and, of course, the cost.
Hope springs eternal...

Where are you living now?
I could live about anywhere, except where there is traffic.
I'm also thinking of staying away from the "bubble", don't need to. Though I could consider finding a place where a bubble is forming, sometimes there is opportunity.

Living in a place where European tourists show up is ok. I think the indicator is wether or not there is a golf course. No offense to those that like the sport, I just don't like it.

if I'm going to focus on putting a projectile in a specific place, a golf ball would not be my projectile of choice.





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That's a good idea. I thought about living near the beach for that reason, but decided it made no sense to live somewhere for the one or two weeks a year when someone might visit. However, having a second home near the beach might be worth considering. The question is it worth the hassle of having and, of course, the cost.
I think it depends on how often you would actually use the second home. If it would see a lot of use, either several months at a time, or maybe long weekends as well as longer stays throughout the year, then . . . maybe. The one time in my life when I owned a second home (a rural lakeside property), the hassle factor far exceeded our actual use and enjoyment of the property. Especially if it's just for a few weeks a year when friends visit, renting a beach house gives you worry-free time on the beach without spending the time and energy the property would require during the other 50 weeks of the year. Of course there is the investment and potential income aspect, but that is another matter to be weighed carefully.

For myself, I'd much rather be free to explore different places in Mexico in my free time, rather than returning to one location. But for those who delight in the crises and challenges of property management, and find them enjoyable rather than a drain on their time, it's an entirely different equation!

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I I'm thinking a beach house within 40 minutes of an international airport would be the way to go if I want to persuade friends and family to visit.
I'm also thinking of staying away from the "bubble", don't need to.
if I'm going to focus on putting a projectile in a specific place, a golf ball would not be my projectile of choice.
Many beach towns are expat bubbles (I assume this is what you mean by "bubble"), with so many foreigners that they become Mexico Lite, at least seasonally. Strong chance of golf courses cropping up nearby.

Fine for a visit, but not my preferred scene for longer term living. To each their own of course, some people walk on the beach every day and seem deliriously happy about it.

One thing I really like about this forum, in addition to all the great and valuable advice, is the assortment of places various posters have landed. I really like the insights into and descriptions of what life is like in different areas - educational.
 

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I think it depends on how often you would actually use the second home. If it would see a lot of use, either several months at a time, or maybe long weekends as well as longer stays throughout the year, then . . . maybe. The one time in my life when I owned a second home (a rural lakeside property), the hassle factor far exceeded our actual use and enjoyment of the property. Especially if it's just for a few weeks a year when friends visit, renting a beach house gives you worry-free time on the beach without spending the time and energy the property would require during the other 50 weeks of the year. Of course there is the investment and potential income aspect, but that is another matter to be weighed carefully.

For myself, I'd much rather be free to explore different places in Mexico in my free time, rather than returning to one location. But for those who delight in the crises and challenges of property management, and find them enjoyable rather than a drain on their time, it's an entirely different equation!

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We are back to holding on to things or not, you need a place to hold onto things. I'm not saying either lifestyle is better. This concept of being migratory is something I need to really do some soul searching to see if I really need to hang onto things, movable and real estate.

My idea is to live in Yucatan, and perhaps escape to my mother's summer house in Morelos if some months are too hot. So I would not own two places, unless I inherit a property.
 

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Many beach towns are expat bubbles (I assume this is what you mean by "bubble"), with so many foreigners that they become Mexico Lite, at least seasonally. Strong chance of golf courses cropping up nearby.

Fine for a visit, but not my preferred scene for longer term living. To each their own of course, some people walk on the beach every day and seem deliriously happy about it.

One thing I really like about this forum, in addition to all the great and valuable advice, is the assortment of places various posters have landed. I really like the insights into and descriptions of what life is like in different areas - educational.
That's what I meant by bubble.
:)

I've found a place that I don't think will become a tourist bubble in the near future. It has geographical constraints.
Actually I see two phases, the rich people in the nearby city will buy, and will push up the value, as the town goes through Mexican gentrification. As Merida grows this beach town will become an expensive suburb.

It's too small to catch the eye of FONATUR (Mexican agency which gave birth to places like Cancun, Loreto etc).

There is the boredom factor, but the town is 40 minutes away from Merida a vibrant city. This would be equivalent to me taking BART into San Francisco to party in The City...

A three and a half hour drive to Cancun. I've got at least two buddies from High School that live there and maybe a couple more from college. That's like a drive from where I live now to Tahoe. People drive that to ski over the weekend.

You do want some people coming in seasonally, they just might not all be Americans. When you are off the beaten path you tend to see Europeans in the mix.

Of course this is all on paper, and theoretical, one visit and I might be looking elsewhere.
 

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A three and a half hour drive to Cancun. I've got at least two buddies from High School that live there and maybe a couple more from college. That's like a drive from where I live now to Tahoe. People drive that to ski over the weekend.
.......

Of course this is all on paper, and theoretical, one visit and I might be looking elsewhere.
My own experience with great friends from 10+ years ago is ... you spend a couple of nights with them. You reminisce and have some laughs. They still like you, you still like them. But 50% chance you realize you've changed and they've changed to the point there won't be a high volume of interaction going forward. Applies to family also (though Mom is always Mom).
 

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My own experience with great friends from 10+ years ago is ... you spend a couple of nights with them. You reminisce and have some laughs. They still like you, you still like them. But 50% chance you realize you've changed and they've changed to the point there won't be a high volume of interaction going forward. Applies to family also (though Mom is always Mom).
Very true. As we turn older we become more set in our ways. It is as if they became more stubborn. This "drift" is especially important if they have a wife or girlfriend, the old buddy is buried deep below his new roles.


Mexicans are a little more friendlier and less into the concept of self. So the so put up with differences a little more. However "the clingy friend and the dead man sink around the third day". "El muerto y el arrimado a los tres días apestan"

In México there is a macho code between friends, you can't turn down drinks, be stingy and a friend of a friend is your friend. So even if you drift, your find new friends, because you've been vouched for.

For example a friend here in Walnut Creek who is Mexican has a good buddy in San Cristóbal, who happens to be a Juez de Distrito. They went to law school together. If I go there I'm almost obligated to look him up. He's almost obligated to have drinks and welcome me. If I end up living there, I build friendships from that first seed. You have to be interesting, educated and understand the social rules to stay in the game. In smaller towns, new people sometimes are mini celebrities.

On the flip side you have to be very careful with dating local women. In Narco land you can get shot. The macho code works both ways.







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