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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I'm thinking about applying for 189 & 190 Visa and I'm coming from America. Quick question about when I'll be eligible for healthcare. I have a medical condition that requires infusions from the hospital every 6 weeks. I read about the following 104 weeks waiting period for newly arrived residents...w.w.w.humanservices.gov.au/customer/enablers/newly-arrived-residents-waiting-period#exemptvisas

1) Does the above waiting period apply to 189/190 Visa holders?
2) What medical conditions must a candidate have in order to fail the health check prior to Visa approval?
3) Besides Medicare offered in Australia, do most employers offer private health insurance plan to employees separate from the government plan?

Thanks
 

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Hi All,

I'm thinking about applying for 189 & 190 Visa and I'm coming from America. Quick question about when I'll be eligible for healthcare. I have a medical condition that requires infusions from the hospital every 6 weeks. I read about the following 104 weeks waiting period for newly arrived residents...w.w.w.humanservices.gov.au/customer/enablers/newly-arrived-residents-waiting-period#exemptvisas

1) Does the above waiting period apply to 189/190 Visa holders?
2) What medical conditions must a candidate have in order to fail the health check prior to Visa approval?
3) Besides Medicare offered in Australia, do most employers offer private health insurance plan to employees separate from the government plan?

Thanks
1. There is no waiting period for Medicare for any permanent visa holder, although there are waiting periods for social security (Centrlink) payments, like unemployment payments. Medicare in Australia, although by no means perfect, is very different (much better) than in the US.

2. Will my medical condition be a significant cost?
Significant costs and services in short supply

Without a proper medical assessment by a panel doctor and assessment after that of possible costs, you may not know if you'll meet the criterion or not - costs here are very different (generally a lot lower) than in the US.

3. A few Employers do, but most don't. Most people that have private health insurance buy it themselves, it's not hugely expensive (although still a significant cost). A little over half of all Australians have Private Health Insurance - a lot simply don't see the need and use Medicare.

A lot of Privately Insured people often choose to use Medicare only, when say going to hospital for simple things, as there may be no significant benefit using their Private Insurance. You still have Medicare cover even if privately insured and can use either.

Going to a GP is partly to fully covered by Medicare depending on your situation and whether they bulk-bill, and Private Health Insurance won't cover you for that.

There are many items (drugs, etc) covered under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Schema at greatly reduced prices, and generally Private Health Insurance will have extremely limited or no cover in this area. There generally may be up to a 12 month waiting period for some items with Private Health Insurance.

For example I have the highest cover possible for both medical and extras (ancillary cover) with no deductible for my family - premiums do vary from one company to another but not wildly - I pay about A$7000pa for my family (a single person would be half that rate) and that would be seen as a bit expensive - and you may get up to 25% of that back each year at tax time. You also pay 2% of your taxable income each year for Medicare. :)
 

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Hi All,

I'm thinking about applying for 189 & 190 Visa and I'm coming from America. Quick question about when I'll be eligible for healthcare. I have a medical condition that requires infusions from the hospital every 6 weeks. I read about the following 104 weeks waiting period for newly arrived residents...w.w.w.humanservices.gov.au/customer/enablers/newly-arrived-residents-waiting-period#exemptvisas

1) Does the above waiting period apply to 189/190 Visa holders?
2) What medical conditions must a candidate have in order to fail the health check prior to Visa approval?
3) Besides Medicare offered in Australia, do most employers offer private health insurance plan to employees separate from the government plan?

Thanks

Kaju has given excellent overview, to which I would like to add one more point. To gain 189/190 you will need to undergo a medical check. This does not mean you cannot or will not be granted a visa, but I would advise you to take advice from a licensed agent that understands the medical before spending large amounts of cash on visa applications.
 

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Kaju has given excellent overview, to which I would like to add one more point. To gain 189/190 you will need to undergo a medical check. This does not mean you cannot or will not be granted a visa, but I would advise you to take advice from a licensed agent that understands the medical before spending large amounts of cash on visa applications.
Yes, I should have explained "panel doctor" etc better, although the links I provide allude to that requirement. And as you say, a MARA registered Migration Agent may the best to go to for advice. :)

For a little more on general DIBP health requirements for govtec to consider, have a look here:

This is why the requirement exists: http://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa/Heal/overview-of-the-health-requirement

This is what you would need to do: http://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa/Heal/meeting-the-health-requirement/health-examinations

Possibly, govtec may be able to search for other applicants with a similar condition to check how they may have fared in relation to DIBP's medical requirements. :)

As FFacs has said, visa fees are expensive, and you would need to apply before having the medical, so it's worth seeking advice before applying, to be safe. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks all. I'll have to do more research and will read up on this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Do you have any suggestion as far as contacting a pharmacy or hospital facility to get an idea of cost for medication? I'm not necessarily looking for specific cost but a ballpark figure of lets say hundreds or thousands of dollars of out of pocket expense would be helpful in my situation.
 

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Do you have any suggestion as far as contacting a pharmacy or hospital facility to get an idea of cost for medication? I'm not necessarily looking for specific cost but a ballpark figure of lets say hundreds or thousands of dollars of out of pocket expense would be helpful in my situation.
Assuming you got a Permanent Visa (which will depend upon the medical assessment as well as meeting the other standard visa requirements) the cost will vary depending on what the medication is and if it is covered under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

Say you had MS and needed Infliximab/Remicade shots - they'd cost about $670 each as a visitor. But as a Permanent Resident, you'd automatically have Medicare, so the cost would be $38 each. Unless you had a Health Care Card (for Age/Carer/Disability Pensioners), then they would be $6.30.

For PBS medications, there is a Safety Net limit of about $1500 a year, so after you spend that much, that each PBS item is $6.30 (or free if you have a Health Care Card)

You can check whether individual drugs are covered here: Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) | Home
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Assuming you got a Permanent Visa (which will depend upon the medical assessment as well as meeting the other standard visa requirements) the cost will vary depending on what the medication is and if it is covered under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

Say you had MS and needed Infliximab/Remicade shots - they'd cost about $670 each as a visitor. But as a Permanent Resident, you'd automatically have Medicare, so the cost would be $38 each. Unless you had a Health Care Card (for Age/Carer/Disability Pensioners), then they would be $6.30.

For PBS medications, there is a Safety Net limit of about $1500 a year, so after you spend that much, that each PBS item is $6.30 (or free if you have a Health Care Card)

You can check whether individual drugs are covered here: Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) | Home
Excellent info! This is exactly what I was hoping for. You rock kaju! Thanks a lot
 
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