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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

This is my first post to this forum after four years of trying to find a PR path and living in Australia. Was wondering if anyone on here knows anyone with heart conditions that have passed the visa medical and what their condition was?

My background, I'm an NZ Citizen ineligible for any and NZ specific PR routes (RRV, Protected SCV and 189 (NZ) are all out for me). So I'm looking to get either a 189, 190 or 820/801 through my partner.

I have a worry about the medical requirement and was wanting some help from knowledgeable people on here to put my mind at ease (or at least ease it slightly).

Medical history: I had Kawasaki's Disease when I was four years old (back in 1996), this resulted in a mild dilation of the left coronary artery and luckily no aneurysms whatsoever (others who have KD aren't so lucky). I was on aspirin for two years until subsequent ECGs, heart stress tests and so on have showed that my dilation has all but disappeared. As per original doctor's orders back in '96, I had ECGs approx every four years in 2001, 2005 and 2009 when the doctors said I no longer required testing. At my own request I had one in 2018 just in case and again no coronary artery dilation.

I require no medication going forward, not even aspirin since 1998 and my previous heart condition no longer exists as far as the ECGs are concerned. I was wondering what everyone on here thought about my chances of passing below that medical costs threshold $49,000 over a maximum of 10 years? given that my max medicare cost since arriving in 2015 have been about $200 per year for general check ups and my requested 2018 ECG (also I do see the irony of the Commonwealth Government worrying about my potential medicare costs to them given that I am already eligible for medicare.)

Is it worth going to another cardiologist to get the all clear again just before my official medical just in case?

Also is there any way of finding the results of a visa medical without paying the visa fee upfront (I'd like to know I've passed or have a good chance of passing before spending the $4k-$8k visa fee if at all possible).

Thanks in advance for any help or direction you can provide.
 

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Hi all,

This is my first post to this forum after four years of trying to find a PR path and living in Australia. Was wondering if anyone on here knows anyone with heart conditions that have passed the visa medical and what their condition was?

My background, I'm an NZ Citizen ineligible for any and NZ specific PR routes (RRV, Protected SCV and 189 (NZ) are all out for me). So I'm looking to get either a 189, 190 or 820/801 through my partner.

I have a worry about the medical requirement and was wanting some help from knowledgeable people on here to put my mind at ease (or at least ease it slightly).

Medical history: I had Kawasaki's Disease when I was four years old (back in 1996), this resulted in a mild dilation of the left coronary artery and luckily no aneurysms whatsoever (others who have KD aren't so lucky). I was on aspirin for two years until subsequent ECGs, heart stress tests and so on have showed that my dilation has all but disappeared. As per original doctor's orders back in '96, I had ECGs approx every four years in 2001, 2005 and 2009 when the doctors said I no longer required testing. At my own request I had one in 2018 just in case and again no coronary artery dilation.

I require no medication going forward, not even aspirin since 1998 and my previous heart condition no longer exists as far as the ECGs are concerned. I was wondering what everyone on here thought about my chances of passing below that medical costs threshold $49,000 over a maximum of 10 years? given that my max medicare cost since arriving in 2015 have been about $200 per year for general check ups and my requested 2018 ECG (also I do see the irony of the Commonwealth Government worrying about my potential medicare costs to them given that I am already eligible for medicare.)

Is it worth going to another cardiologist to get the all clear again just before my official medical just in case?

Also is there any way of finding the results of a visa medical without paying the visa fee upfront (I'd like to know I've passed or have a good chance of passing before spending the $4k-$8k visa fee if at all possible).

Thanks in advance for any help or direction you can provide.
Just curious
What additional benefit or advantage do you get after getting an Australian PR which you are not getting now ?

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi NB,

The subclass 444 visa is a strange one, and I'm not complaining. It is the gold class of temporary visas for sure, given that it's effectively a permanent temporary visa. What is doesn't allow us to have since 2001 is:

1. Pathway to Australian Citizenship and all rights that being a citizen affords you over having PR
2. HELP Loans for studying (though we are eligible for Commonwealth Supported Places and Research Training Program stipends). I went to an Australian University for my Master of Science degree, and am super grateful that I received a CSP, however I did have to pay upfront every semester, which can be a burden when you have no income. I also appreciate however that I'm lucky to have the CSP over paying international student fees.
3. Knowing that you can stay even if something goes wrong with the health or character requirements (e.g. potentially catching TB overseas, the immigration or home affairs minister believes that you're associated with an organisation that they don't like, even if you either haven't been associated with that organisation for a long time, or never were associated and they've somehow linked the two together, and so on an so forth). Kiwis are being deported in record numbers, and while many of those are for serious crimes, others are for relatively minor offences and they've been in Australia since they were small children, or some even born here. I personally don't feel I'm at risk of deportation, but it is something that other NZ citizens are effected by here.
4. The right to have a child born in Australia automatically become an Australian Citizen rather than waiting until their 10th birthday (I believe 10 years old is how the law stands right now, though I haven't looked into this one in particular for a while.)
5. Eligibility for the NDIS and various other social security payments. I'm gainfully employed, but were anything to happen to me, say I became disable or even needed assistance while searching for another job, I've had to come up with a larger than normal back up fund just in case anything happens.
6. I would personally like the right to vote, but for some this in neither here nor there.
7. I work as a Geophysicist, but am not allowed to work for Geoscience Australia or any other federal government agency without being a citizen, even though some of those jobs would be a great place to work or have a career.

This list is what I can remember off the top of my head.

There's a comprehensive overview of the difference between advantages of having PR/Citizenship and the subclass 444 visa at on the OzKiwi website, Google Oz Kiwi Factsheet if you're interested.

If you have any questions about the SC 444 visa or anything else about NZ Citizens in Australia I'm happy to answer what I can in this or any other post on the forum.
 

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Hi all,



This is my first post to this forum after four years of trying to find a PR path and living in Australia. Was wondering if anyone on here knows anyone with heart conditions that have passed the visa medical and what their condition was?



My background, I'm an NZ Citizen ineligible for any and NZ specific PR routes (RRV, Protected SCV and 189 (NZ) are all out for me). So I'm looking to get either a 189, 190 or 820/801 through my partner.



I have a worry about the medical requirement and was wanting some help from knowledgeable people on here to put my mind at ease (or at least ease it slightly).



Medical history: I had Kawasaki's Disease when I was four years old (back in 1996), this resulted in a mild dilation of the left coronary artery and luckily no aneurysms whatsoever (others who have KD aren't so lucky). I was on aspirin for two years until subsequent ECGs, heart stress tests and so on have showed that my dilation has all but disappeared. As per original doctor's orders back in '96, I had ECGs approx every four years in 2001, 2005 and 2009 when the doctors said I no longer required testing. At my own request I had one in 2018 just in case and again no coronary artery dilation.



I require no medication going forward, not even aspirin since 1998 and my previous heart condition no longer exists as far as the ECGs are concerned. I was wondering what everyone on here thought about my chances of passing below that medical costs threshold $49,000 over a maximum of 10 years? given that my max medicare cost since arriving in 2015 have been about $200 per year for general check ups and my requested 2018 ECG (also I do see the irony of the Commonwealth Government worrying about my potential medicare costs to them given that I am already eligible for medicare.)



Is it worth going to another cardiologist to get the all clear again just before my official medical just in case?



Also is there any way of finding the results of a visa medical without paying the visa fee upfront (I'd like to know I've passed or have a good chance of passing before spending the $4k-$8k visa fee if at all possible).



Thanks in advance for any help or direction you can provide.


To the best of my understanding, as you do not have an ongoing health condition nor going through medication you should pass the medical clearance requirement. Being onshore, you can check with BUPA centers who does health checks for visas whether past health condition do have any relevance now. Though they do not have the obligation to inform the outcome of health check they could based on understanding and the interpretation of legislation related to medical. Officially DoHA says unless you lodge a visa and do submit the medical test they cannot let you know whether you will pass or not. By the way, once you lodge PR application and if you fail they will ask you and your dependents to leave within 28days if they finalize with negative outcome.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi RockyRaj,

I've had advice from a MARA agent and if I fail my PR medical my subclass 444 visa should still be valid (as its validity is only based on whether or not I have active TB in the medical requirement space, and if I meet the character test which I do). I know that if I failed the medical onshore, and I was on a bridging visa that I would be issued with a 28 day leave notice, again unsure if you were on another type of temporary visa but different temporary visas appear to have different medical requirements by my understanding. Again, I don't think I'm going to fail and thanks for your clarification of your understanding. Much appreciated.
 
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