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Hello again everyone,
Thanks in advance for the help. I am a United States of American citizen that will be traveling to Australia on a holiday and work visa.

I want to medical insurance while I am there, does anyone have experience with this?

I am trying to decide if I should try to get international insurance from a U.S.A. provider or if I should get insurance from an Australian provider (if thats possible)?

Any advice or feedback on your experience would be appreciated.
 
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If you already have cover that has or can be easily extended to cover Australia that would be good as it would cover repatriation should you need it.

Australian cover would ensure you are most fully covered by providers rather than limited to specific possibly limuted providers with US cover but it won't usually cover repatriation.

You would need full overseas visitors cover similar to what 457 visa holders have and you can compare prices online
 

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Hello again everyone,
Thanks in advance for the help. I am a United States of American citizen that will be traveling to Australia on a holiday and work visa.

I want to medical insurance while I am there, does anyone have experience with this?

I am trying to decide if I should try to get international insurance from a U.S.A. provider or if I should get insurance from an Australian provider (if thats possible)?

Any advice or feedback on your experience would be appreciated.
It depends on what your needs are. If you are just looking for emergency care only (e.g. if you happen to break a leg for example and need surgery) then any kind of travel insurance that you would get in the States would be sufficient coverage for you while you're here. Look into TravelGuard, American Express Insurance, Access America, etc. It will probably cost you a few hundred bucks to cover you for a year. For doctor's visits (for non-emergency issues) and scripts, you would have to pay for these out-of-pocket. Doc visits are about $70-90, scripts vary in cost but you wouldn't qualify for the PBS discounts that citizens and PRs get. (I find that even without the discounts, prices for medications here tend to be lower than in the US.) The other benefit of getting travel insurance in the US before you leave is that it often covers a variety of things that are of significance to travellers - things like lost baggage, flight delays and cancellations, lost or stolen valuables, costs of replacing lost passports and repatriation as shel mentioned. Sometimes it even covers you for car rentals. You wouldn't get that with Australian medical cover.

If you want full medical cover, you'll need to look into Australian insurance plans but if the reason is that you have a pre-existing condition that you need treated while you're in Australia, you should be aware that nearly every insurance company has a waiting period of up to one year. This means that you'd effectively be paying for insurance that you'd never be able to use (with regards to the pre-existing condition) since you wouldn't be able to stay for more than a year on the Working Holiday Visa anyway.
 
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