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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry for asking, I did a search, didn't find anything. I'm Canadian, soon 65 yrs. I had a heart oblation last year for arthmia, so when I'm applying for medical or travel insurance my rate goes up, pre-existing condition (which doesn't exist). Some insurance don't ask that many questions.
What scares me is that the rates go way up as I get older. Average cost now is $200 to $250 /month and by age 79 goes to $1800, Philippine Blue cross was the cheapest at 79 at $1200+/month and they will insure beyond 80yrs. I know I can't afford that.
What do older men use for insurance? I have free health care and drugs in Canada, but apparently I need to reside in Canada 5 months a year to keep it (not sure how they monitor this) and in an emergency I wouldn't be able to travel home.
 

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Health insurance for the older person gets very expensive real quick. Phil Health although only part pays is probably the best then put what you would pay for health cover in a bank account, preferably overseas. Hopefully you will get a reasonably big pot before you need to dip into it. If you could sit on a few thousand dollars you would be covered for most eventualities.
 

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Health insurance for the older person gets very expensive real quick. Phil Health although only part pays is probably the best then put what you would pay for health cover in a bank account, preferably overseas. Hopefully you will get a reasonably big pot before you need to dip into it. If you could sit on a few thousand dollars you would be covered for most eventualities.
This is the method I'm using. I am now 76 years old and find anything dealing with insurance seems to be outrageous. The Wife is a Senior here, so is eligible for Phil Health and as i understand for a slight extra fee, I can be included with her. This has to be still checked out to verify. Even though they don't pay much, I guess it's better than nothing, and as I understand, will facilitate admission to a Hospital, if/when required. I do have Medicare and VA coverage, but have to travel to the States to avail myself to them.

Fred
 

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what do filipinos do when they get old, just die at home?
That is exactly what they do unless they can somehow "borrow" from friends & relatives enough to get care. Needless to say, the "borrowed" funds are soon forgotten and just swept under the rug. I have personal knowledge of this practice, as about 15 years ago, there was a wife about to die for lack of care and her husband was going to let her die because he had no funds. My Wife "loaned" him funds, the woman is still living, the funds have never been repaid and they are still friends. It's how things are done here.

As an afterthought. We recently attended the Wake for two past friends of my Wife and were expected to pass some money to the surviving families. I guess, to them the foreigner is rich and has deep pockets.

Fred
 

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This is the method I'm using. I am now 76 years old and find anything dealing with insurance seems to be outrageous. The Wife is a Senior here, so is eligible for Phil Health and as i understand for a slight extra fee, I can be included with her. This has to be still checked out to verify. Even though they don't pay much, I guess it's better than nothing, and as I understand, will facilitate admission to a Hospital, if/when required. I do have Medicare and VA coverage, but have to travel to the States to avail myself to them.
Fred
As a senior Filipino/Filipina, one becomes a member for life of Philhealth. No membership fees, no contributions, no payments required. The spouse of the Philhealth member is his/her dependent and is also covered. HOWEVER, it covers a small percentage of the hospital bill and can be deducted before payment of the account.
 

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As an afterthought. We recently attended the Wake for two past friends of my Wife and were expected to pass some money to the surviving families. I guess, to them the foreigner is rich and has deep pockets.
Fred
This is an old tradition. Call it "culture". Death in the Philippines is expensive especially in the provinces. The family serves food and drinks, during the wake, after the funeral and every night when they say prayers for the dead which is at least nine days.

Everyone, collegues, neighbors, relatives, politicians give something, usually cash. Some food. Others help in the kitchen, with food preparation or cleaning up.

Your contribution is supposed to help defray expenses.
 

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This is an old tradition. Call it "culture". Death in the Philippines is expensive especially in the provinces. The family serves food and drinks, during the wake, after the funeral and every night when they say prayers for the dead which is at least nine days.

Everyone, collegues, neighbors, relatives, politicians give something, usually cash. Some food. Others help in the kitchen, with food preparation or cleaning up.

Your contribution is supposed to help defray expenses.
Thank you for explaining this somewhat. I have already fully funded for the time of my demise, all that will be required is a phone call and all will be taken care of.

I guess I am a bit perturbed by what goes as normal here is so completely the opposite of the US culture. As an example. we where invited and attended several Birthday Parties, Baptisms, and such and to each, at my Wife's insistance, we went bearing gifts/cash for the participants involved. When it came time for my Birthday earlier this year, she informed me that since it is your Birthday, you must treat the group(inlaws & friends) at one of the local establishments. I must admit, I did receive several "Happy Birthday, Tito" but nothing else. It just gets a little old after a time, and this practice will cease. I guess it goes with being the Foreigner.

Fred
 

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I have only been here 5 years but have seen the same things. I still give our nieces and nephews gifts/money for birthdays/baptisms/graduations/etc. The adults get good wishes except at Christmas. I also can not understand that if it is your birthday, you are supposed to treat everyone else. Just seems upside down to me.
 

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Thank you for explaining this somewhat. I have already fully funded for the time of my demise, all that will be required is a phone call and all will be taken care of.

I guess I am a bit perturbed by what goes as normal here is so completely the opposite of the US culture. As an example. we where invited and attended several Birthday Parties, Baptisms, and such and to each, at my Wife's insistance, we went bearing gifts/cash for the participants involved. When it came time for my Birthday earlier this year, she informed me that since it is your Birthday, you must treat the group(inlaws & friends) at one of the local establishments. I must admit, I did receive several "Happy Birthday, Tito" but nothing else. It just gets a little old after a time, and this practice will cease. I guess it goes with being the Foreigner.

Fred
I reckon if that happens when we move back, We WILL be celebrating At Home!!
 

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...... I have free health care and drugs in Canada, but apparently I need to reside in Canada 5 months a year to keep it (not sure how they monitor this) and in an emergency I wouldn't be able to travel home.
In Manitoba at least you are eligable for coverage the day you return to Manitoba.
 

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Thank you for explaining this somewhat. I have already fully funded for the time of my demise, all that will be required is a phone call and all will be taken care of.

I guess I am a bit perturbed by what goes as normal here is so completely the opposite of the US culture. As an example. we where invited and attended several Birthday Parties, Baptisms, and such and to each, at my Wife's insistance, we went bearing gifts/cash for the participants involved. When it came time for my Birthday earlier this year, she informed me that since it is your Birthday, you must treat the group(inlaws & friends) at one of the local establishments. I must admit, I did receive several "Happy Birthday, Tito" but nothing else. It just gets a little old after a time, and this practice will cease. I guess it goes with being the Foreigner.

Fred
Fred ,u dont have to fund anything....its a ploy. Just say no. They survived without you before and will after you are gone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
In Manitoba at least you are eligable for coverage the day you return to Manitoba.
I'm actually Ukrainian decent, family from Manitoba. Might be worth it to keep a residence in MN. I live in Ontario, OHIP requires that I live in Canada 5 months each year to be covered, not sure how or if they can monitor that.
 

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Fred ,u dont have to fund anything....its a ploy. Just say no. They survived without you before and will after you are gone.
You Got it Spot On!!! - It's all just a game of "Milk the Foreigner". If you want play the game you support the stereotype - Just Say NO :)
 

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Thank you for explaining this somewhat. I have already fully funded for the time of my demise, all that will be required is a phone call and all will be taken care of.

I guess I am a bit perturbed by what goes as normal here is so completely the opposite of the US culture. As an example. we where invited and attended several Birthday Parties, Baptisms, and such and to each, at my Wife's insistance, we went bearing gifts/cash for the participants involved. When it came time for my Birthday earlier this year, she informed me that since it is your Birthday, you must treat the group(inlaws & friends) at one of the local establishments. I must admit, I did receive several "Happy Birthday, Tito" but nothing else. It just gets a little old after a time, and this practice will cease. I guess it goes with being the Foreigner.

Fred
Actually, anybody who may be "perceived to have money" may be subjected to this.
I have noticed that Filipinos returning from overseas jobs are subjected to this behavior, as well as foreigners. It does not really matter if the OFW worked 7 days a week for a wage which was lower than most in their host country. The OFW may still be perceived as an ATM by others who have adopted a victim-attitude.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
In Manitoba at least you are eligable for coverage the day you return to Manitoba.
to be eligable for Manitoba Health a person needs to reside in Manitoba 6 months of the year. I just checked that. If I could just keep a residence there to keep coverage I would (have relatives), but I would have to live there 6 months, in Ontario I have to be here 5 months.
 
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