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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,I need some help and info on what's the best option for me to go with on those with better experiences on the way this works.
So to give you some background information,Me and my french boyfriend want to get married once he turns 18 (we've been dating for 6 years now and known each other longer.) However because the age of consent in France is 18,I'm not sure what route to take in order to get a visa to stay in France with him.

We want our marriage date to be October 24 (his birthday is on the 20th of the same month) should i-
a.) Apply for a long stay visitor visa under the reasons of marriage two months before our wedding even though he won't be 18 yet? If I do do this should i apply for 6 months or 1 year?
b.) Apply for the same visa but under different reasons because he's not 18 by the time I'm applying?
c.) Or should i get a tourist visa,stay the 40 days,and get married and come back to get my spouse visa? Do i still have to wait the 3 months before applying if i go this route?

I'm also quite curious for those whose visas have gotten accepted,how much in your savings did you have when you applied?

I want an idea of what goal i should aim for especially since I don't know how generous the consulate of Miami is.
I am extremely anxious of rejection and I want to avoid making mistakes that'll be too costly for me,basically i want to get everything right the first time.
 

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It changes over time, but in the past, we've had reports that the Miami consulate can be real sticklers for the requirements for a visa or other documents. Not sure if they are one of the consulates that no longer does long-stay visas for someone planning to get married in France. (Several consulates no longer offer this option.)

I take it you're already of legal age for France, so that shouldn't be an issue. Of the options you have outlined, it might be easiest (if more expensive) to go over on a tourist visa, get married, then you return when you have the livret de famille in hand to get your spouse visa. However, your boyfriend should definitely check with his local mairie (town hall) to see if he can submit the dossier for the wedding before he turns 18. The mairies vary in their interpretation of the rules, and some may refuse to take the dossier at all while he's still under age. (Also, he should get the list of documents you will need as a foreigner to get married in France, as that also can vary by town.)

It's not a bad idea to plan on getting to France 40 days in advance of the wedding, if only to assemble the necessary documents - some of which are only obtainable through the US Consulate in Paris. Then, there is the need for certified translations, which can take a bit of time and must be done by a traductor assermenté. There may also be the need to schedule an interview with the mayor (or one of the adjoints) to determine the "validity" of the relationship.

If you want to get the long-stay visa right away, you'll need a "reason" for wanting to live in France (other than to get married) plus adequate financial resources to finance your stay for the term of your visa. It's up to the prefecture whether or not you can change status from a six month visa to a spouse visa - technically speaking, a six month visa may not be renewable, which seems to be the criteria. The other thing to figure is that, while there are only limited OFII requirements on arrival for someone on a visitor visa, you'll have to go through the OFII processing when you change status (in some cases before you change status) - and this takes time.

Anyhow, check out how far in advance the mairie will accept your dossier first, and I'd go with the tourist visa option, if at all possible. If you line up an appointment at the Miami consulate ahead of time, you can probably keep your return trip to a week or two (maybe even a honeymoon!) and be back in France to set up housekeeping in short order. (With a livret de famille in hand, a spouse visa should take only a few days, maybe a week or two at most.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If I go through the tourist visa route,do i still have to wait the 90 days before applying for a spouse visa or can I do it immediately I arrive back to the US? Must I sit through all the 90 days in France before returning so my tourist visa won't be active?

Thank you for responding.
 

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If I go through the tourist visa route,do i still have to wait the 90 days before applying for a spouse visa or can I do it immediately I arrive back to the US? Must I sit through all the 90 days in France before returning so my tourist visa won't be active?

Thank you for responding.
No, not at all. You can leave France the day after the wedding if you like. (But it can take a couple of days to a week or so to get the livret de famille after the wedding and THAT is what you need to get the spouse visa.)

The tourist visa (actually just a stamp in your passport on entry) is valid for UP TO 90 days. But you don't need to stay a full 90 days.

It can, however, take a while to get an appointment back at the consulate to submit your visa paperwork. Before you get married, you should take a look online to see how far out they are giving visa appointments. It could be worthwhile to take an appointment before you leave France. But as long as you have all the necessary paperwork, that appointment can be the day after you return to the US. (That might be cutting it a bit tight, though.) Once your dossier is accepted, it should take no more than a few days to (maybe) a week or so to get you visa so you can return to France.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Errrm... Did anybody else notice the oddity in this story?

The OP has beeen going out with the boy for 6 years and has known him longer...
Soon he is 18.
That means they started dating when he was 12!

Yet the story about her moving to France sounds more like a responsible adult talking than a fellow childhood sweetheart...

Are you Mrs Macron?

Regards


Ian
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Errrm... Did anybody else notice the oddity in this story?

The OP has beeen going out with the boy for 6 years and has known him longer...
Soon he is 18.
That means they started dating when he was 12!

Yet the story about her moving to France sounds more like a responsible adult talking than a fellow childhood sweetheart...

Are you Mrs Macron?

Regards


Ian
Well, he is a childhood sweetheart.
Half of my family is french and I meet him when I was really young through a family friend. I'm pretty close with my family so we reunite together every year or so and between then we stayed in contact. They usually love visiting the states which is why I came here to make extra sure my information is correct to avoid costly mistakes espiecally one specific to my current situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh, I noticed that - but hey, life is strange and who are we to judge?
Cheers,
Bev
I do have a few more questions if you don't mind. As I was doing more research, I found that I don't have to go get a visa if I have an American passport which I do,so do I not have to set up an appointment at all and just go straight to France with the supporting documents once I arrive? I see that one of the supporting documents is one of initiary,how exactly do I get this? Do I just write and notarized letter signed by both me and my boyfriend that we just intend to marry?

Thank you.
 

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Much will depend on the view of the Mayor who will be marrying you (that will be the Mayor where your boyfriend is currently resident). It might be wise if your boyfriend, perhaps in conjunction with his parents, approaches the Mayor to determine what documentation is required in the specific circumstances. You (your boyfriend actually) will need to determine with the commune availability of marriage dates. You should expect that both of you will need to attend an interview with the Mayor (or his office). Whether you could do everything on a 90-day tourist entry (and I assume that's how you've been entering France to date) I have no idea, but remember that you can't just enter and leave France on a that status at will, there are rules, eg. rolling 90 days in 180 days.

One of the potential difficulties you will face (as I think you are aware) is whether the Mayor will be willing to commence the paperwork for the marriage before you boyfriend turns 18. Of course, if not, you could always start the process after he turns 18 - but then, of course, you would definitely not achieve your desired marriage date.
 

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I do have a few more questions if you don't mind. As I was doing more research, I found that I don't have to go get a visa if I have an American passport which I do,so do I not have to set up an appointment at all and just go straight to France with the supporting documents once I arrive? I see that one of the supporting documents is one of initiary,how exactly do I get this? Do I just write and notarized letter signed by both me and my boyfriend that we just intend to marry?

Thank you.
There are a couple of separate processes here. The first is that of getting married in France. You could check out the document from the US Consulate in Paris on this - and as it explains, you really do have to consult with the mairie in which you will get married, as the requirements for marriage (particularly with a foreigner) can vary from one town to the next. https://fr.usembassy.gov/u-s-citize...ns-in-france/local-resources-of-u-s-citizens/ and then click on the drop down for Marriage and Divorce.

Once you are married, you will need to return to the US (if you came to France on a Schengen - tourist - visa, as you're apparently planning to do) and apply for a spouse visa. For this you will need the Livret de Famille you obtain after the marriage in France, plus whatever other documents your French consulate requires. You cannot get a visa in France. The only exception is that, if you are already in France on a long-stay visa and get married in France, they will allow you to change your status (for your carte de séjour - not really your "visa"). But for that you need to have some form of titre de séjour, even if only the validation of your visa in your passport (but it must be a long-stay visa).
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Sorry if this question has already been answered, but does France grant "Family union - EU" visas for non-marriage partnerships/domestic partnerships (that exclude marriage)? I'm looking to see if I can get an extended visa in France through my partner, we are not married.
 
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