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Look after yourself EH.

If you are supposed to be in hospital, maybe that is not such a bad idea.

Whatever you decide, get well soon. :)
I have a major phobia re hospitals (for good reason BTW) - not French hospitals per se, but hospitals anywhere. I have a condition that i've had all my life - unfortunately health professionals always want to start the very lengthy investigations all over again and do tend to be alarmist, albeit I understand their point of view.

I can manage the most effective treatment at home and at least my GP has grasped that it's not a good idea to push me and that it's not something that has suddenly occurred.
 

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I have a major phobia re hospitals (for good reason BTW) - not French hospitals per se, but hospitals anywhere. I have a condition that i've had all my life - unfortunately health professionals always want to start the very lengthy investigations all over again and do tend to be alarmist, albeit I understand their point of view.

I can manage the most effective treatment at home and at least my GP has grasped that it's not a good idea to push me and that it's not something that has suddenly occurred.
I find that the biggest problem is to get them to think outside the box, out of their own comfort zone... Consider a different approach...

Scenario (mine):
Your triglycerides are too high, cut down on fats - but I don't eat fat, I never have. Cut down on your consumption of fats. But I've never... Cut down...

Look you are giving me testosterone because my levels are too low. Why not check my aromatase levels (aromatase is an enzyme the converts testosterone to œstrogen) and when you have too much aromatase, you get too much œstrogen and too little testosterone (hence you are giving me tesosterone,) the liver converts the excess œstrogen to tryglycerides) because, etc.

Response: Blank look! Cut down ...
 

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Yes, I agree Baldi.

Too many specialists (not so GPs in my experience) work on autopilot...if X condition walks in then the treatment is Y. GPs seem to be more open because they are used to widely different conditions walking in, and sometimes a combination of different diseases, living conditions etc. They accept that a friendly chat and some reassurance is better than "take these pills twice a day".

DejW
 

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Have split this off on a thread of its own, as the topic could get interesting.

I have a tendency to "get into it" with my doctors if I think they're going wrong with me. Some folks I've mentioned this to (particularly here in France) think that's terrible - but all in all I find it has worked out well. AND I do make a point of working with my various doctors rather than just sitting back and taking whatever prescriptions and advice they are handing out.

There are some doctors who really don't like that. But my current doctor is fine with "discussing" my concerns and hesitations and coming to a mutually agreeable approach.

But maybe it's an "expat" thing.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Have split this off on a thread of its own, as the topic could get interesting.

I have a tendency to "get into it" with my doctors if I think they're going wrong with me. Some folks I've mentioned this to (particularly here in France) think that's terrible - but all in all I find it has worked out well. AND I do make a point of working with my various doctors rather than just sitting back and taking whatever prescriptions and advice they are handing out.

There are some doctors who really don't like that. But my current doctor is fine with "discussing" my concerns and hesitations and coming to a mutually agreeable approach.

But maybe it's an "expat" thing.
Cheers,
Bev
You would be surprised how many people I know of various ages who don't just 'sit back and take whatever prescriptions and advice they are handing out', although certainly that's a common approach (as it probably is elsewhere). So perhaps not an "expat" thing.

Anyway, despite all the hoo ha about falling into a coma, I definitely seem to be on the mend, even though I think (from experience) it will take a while. :)

I find GPs generally take a more personal approach and that going to emergency just lands in that big 'no one has the time to listen' (which is undoubtedly true) situation - also they always want to keep me in at least overnight and even then I have a battle signing myself out. Maybe at some point I'll ask my GP for a referral to a haematologist, although the real problem is that I stopped taking the supplements I know work (they're difficult to find here) and then what with one thing and another forgot all about them; plus I have another condition which has masked this one.

I have a GP I like, and hope he continues to practice here for many years - unfortunately he is really overloaded with patients.
 

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I think maybe that is the key - to find a GP you like and can work with. I recall one (very strange) conversation with a French friend here (who is a very proper Parisienne) where she insisted that it doesn't matter which doctor you go to. They all receive the same training and so are all equally qualified. Um, yeah - but, "oh nevermind."

OTOH, she continues to go into Paris for most of her medical needs, even though she lives out here in the suburbs and it's a significant trek into Paris for such things. Oh well. to each his (or her) own.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Try to choose a family doctor just a little younger than yourselves ;
you'll avoid having to find another one when he retires.
Not so sure about that approach - my current doctor is "a little" younger than I am, and in chatting during my last visit, she mentioned that she has four more years until she retires. I fully expect to need another doctor for many years after she retires. Though they are building a "maison de santé" at the end of our street just behind the pharmacy and I may think about switching over when that gets set up (assuming they have a decent doctor in place there).
Cheers,
Bev

PS Of course there is always the issue of how you feel about being treated by Doogie Howser in your "golden years."
 

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Hi Polly

...doesn't say much for your ideas of life expectancy!

If you plan to live until 90 and doctors retire at 60 (say) then you need to chose a doctor 30 years younger!


DejW

Try to choose a family doctor just a little younger than yourselves ;
you'll avoid having to find another one when he retires.
 

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Many doctors have retired recently, are retiring in the near future, or plan to retire in a few years. Others, move away for various reasons. When this occurs patients have to turn elsewhere. So, even if the area where you live has sufficient GPs now or sets up a maison de santé, chances are they will not be overloaded at some time in the future, resulting in reduced 'walk-in and wait' availability, increased waiting times for an appointment, and shorter (therefore less personalised) consultations. It's not just in current 'medical deserts' that will feel the impact. I tend to think there is a real need to take a range of actions to improve the attractiveness of general practice as a career in France and, not only would it take time for actions to achieve results, there will inevitably be a cost to that (far beyond the recent changes to consultation fees).
 

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I find that the biggest problem is to get them to think outside the box, out of their own comfort zone... Consider a different approach...

Scenario (mine):
Your triglycerides are too high, cut down on fats - but I don't eat fat, I never have. Cut down on your consumption of fats. But I've never... Cut down...

Look you are giving me testosterone because my levels are too low. Why not check my aromatase levels (aromatase is an enzyme the converts testosterone to œstrogen) and when you have too much aromatase, you get too much œstrogen and too little testosterone (hence you are giving me tesosterone,) the liver converts the excess œstrogen to tryglycerides) because, etc.

Response: Blank look! Cut down ...
Yes, I agree Baldi.
Too many specialists (not so GPs in my experience) work on autopilot...if X condition walks in then the treatment is Y. GPs seem to be more open because they are used to widely different conditions walking in, and sometimes a combination of different diseases, living conditions etc. They accept that a friendly chat and some reassurance is better than "take these pills twice a day".
DejW
This thread came to mind as I was reading the excellent book by Martin Winckler: "les Brutes en Blanc - la maltraitance médicale"
I heard him speaking about his book on French radio in October 2016 and don't regret buying it.

He paints a grim picture of medical schools in France, explains how doctors in France are formed as technicians rather than healers,
that they consider themselves as bearers of a superior ethic or morality and it's their paternalistic duty to dispense it among the poor, the ignorant, women (!), homosexuals, immigrants.
That the role they assume is not to explain to the patient, to offer him or her a choice, but to simply impose a treatment.

Winkler practised in France for 35 years, often in family planning and gynecological clinics, but since 2008 lives and works in Quebec.
Needless to say, his "accusations" are strongly disapproved by the French medical establishment.
His book never seeks sensationalism but stays humble.
He refers to his personal encounters with patients who have experienced serious difficulties with the medical profession. He compares with the systems in place in other european countries, the USA and Canada and succeeds in explaining how things got this way in France.

A good book to read to arm oneself with courage before going to an appointment with a dreaded specialist..

Winckler is a humanist, not at all as militant or revindicative as Patrick Pelloux who wrote for the medical rubric in Charlie Hebdo.
 
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