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my husband and i are from the USA, but moved to belize 3 1/2 years ago. now we're thinking of relocating to mexico, in particular loreto or huatulco. we're planning a trip later this summer, but wanted to get some input from people who are already there. if you are an expat in loreto or huatulco, could you please share your story with us and let us know how you feel about your decision to relocate there. thank you!
 

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my husband and i are from the USA, but moved to belize 3 1/2 years ago. now we're thinking of relocating to mexico, in particular loreto or huatulco. we're planning a trip later this summer, but wanted to get some input from people who are already there. if you are an expat in loreto or huatulco, could you please share your story with us and let us know how you feel about your decision to relocate there. thank you!
We´ve never been to Loreto but visit Huatulco on occasion from our home in the Chiapas Highlands. We also visit Tehuantepec and other places on the Oaxaca Coast as well as the Chiapas Coast and both the Caribbean and Gulf Coasts of the Yucatan Peninsula.

The Bays at Huatulco are many different things with both pluses and negatives as is true of all oceanfront communities anywhere. There are also a number of more isolated Pacific Coast towns all up and down the Oaxaca and Chiapas Coasts as well as the Guerrero Coast some of which are quite nice if that is the environment you seek.

Give us some more information as to what you expect in a beachfront community in which you will be living all of the time which, as you know, is not the same thing as a periodic vacation spot.

You might also enlighten us as to why you wish to leave Belize with its pleasant beaches and tropical forests to move to the coasts of Oaxaca or Baja.
 

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loreto or huatulco

The only thing I believe these two places have in common is that they are on the coast. I live in Loreto and have visited Huatulco several times. Not sure where to start.
Loreto is a small town, formerly focused on the Sea of Cortez fishery, stretching it's wings to include whale-watching, kayaking, and "adventure tourism". It is centered around it's 300+ year old mission church. In recent years a large development south of town has brought an influx of new second-homers. The ex-pat community has grown as a result. Despite that growth, the economy continues to struggle. Stores open and close. Restaurants come and go. Currently Alaska Airlines pretty much has a lock on the flights in and out of town, with just one small plane a day from Los Angeles. For many visitors, an overnight in LA is required to make a connection with the plane. Smaller, local airlines can get one to the mainland or to Tijuana several times a week. The best beaches tend to be out on the islands, though the development south of town has claimed a very nice white sand beach where the sea is quite shallow. We have windy, cool weather (60's) in January and February (that's when I visit places like Huatulco) and brutally hot and humid weather in July and August (that's when I visit relatives in the northwest). I love the small town feel, having a chance to be part of the community. I love the islands, the boating, the fishing, and, in September, October, June and July, the snorkeling. We can drive the boat through town in just minutes to launch at the local marina, then return to our yard at the end of the day without a hassle.
Huatulco is a relatively new Fonatur development, built for the tourist trade. I actually enjoy the city of Crucecita, which seems to always be bustling. Lots of shopping and lots of nice city parks. "Bahias de Huatulco" also has lots of beautiful white sand beaches. Some of them are developed and some are not. All of the beaches with access are crowded with visitors every day, at least in the time of the year that we visit. In February it is hot and humid. There are several distinct areas, each with their own personalities. Lots of airlines fly in daily from many different cities. There are several large marinas, with lots of fancy boats at moorage.Lots of condos, resort hotels, fine dining.
The two places couldn't feel more different. Loreto is small, Huatulco much larger. Loreto is old, Huatulco is young. Loreto is quiet, Huatulco is busy. Loreto is desert, Huatulco is not. Loreto is on the Sea of Cortez, Huatulco is on the Pacific.
I hope you visit both places before you decide. I would think that if one fits the bill for your retirement, the other will not. The decision shouldn't be too hard. It just depends on what you're looking for.
 

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thank you so much for your wealth of information. we visited huatulco on a cruise and fell in love with it. we will see loreto in august and go from there.
 

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We´ve never been to Loreto but visit Huatulco on occasion from our home in the Chiapas Highlands. We also visit Tehuantepec and other places on the Oaxaca Coast as well as the Chiapas Coast and both the Caribbean and Gulf Coasts of the Yucatan Peninsula.

The Bays at Huatulco are many different things with both pluses and negatives as is true of all oceanfront communities anywhere. There are also a number of more isolated Pacific Coast towns all up and down the Oaxaca and Chiapas Coasts as well as the Guerrero Coast some of which are quite nice if that is the environment you seek.

Give us some more information as to what you expect in a beachfront community in which you will be living all of the time which, as you know, is not the same thing as a periodic vacation spot.

You might also enlighten us as to why you wish to leave Belize with its pleasant beaches and tropical forests to move to the coasts of Oaxaca or Baja.
thank you for your info also. we are looking for a quiet area near a nice swimming/snorkeling beach with access to fishing for my husband. we would like to be near other expats and all of the activities that we enjoy...playing cards/poker, darts, companionship. also would like to be able to walk/bike to some activities to get in better shape.
we are leaving belize because we have completed our exploration of the area and want to try something new. the good beaches in belize are all in placencia...nice place to visit, but wouldn't want to live there. just time to move on.
 

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I haven't been to Loreto, but my fiancé has a house in Puerto Angel, and we spend quite a but of time in Huatulco. Actually I am going to be working teaching English in Huatulco when I arrive in a couple of weeks. I like Huatulco however I wouldn't like to live there, I enjoy Puerto Angel because it is more relaxed to me and not a touristy. There are tons of Canadians always vacationing in Huatulco. I prefer a smaller city, myself. I also recommend Puerto Escondido!
 

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I haven't been to Loreto, but my fiancé has a house in Puerto Angel, and we spend quite a but of time in Huatulco. Actually I am going to be working teaching English in Huatulco when I arrive in a couple of weeks. I like Huatulco however I wouldn't like to live there, I enjoy Puerto Angel because it is more relaxed to me and not a touristy. There are tons of Canadians always vacationing in Huatulco. I prefer a smaller city, myself. I also recommend Puerto Escondido!
we thought about puerto escondido also. may have to check that out. we'll probably travel around for a couple of months and get the feel of the different areas. anyplace else that you would recommend we check out?
 

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we thought about puerto escondido also. may have to check that out. we'll probably travel around for a couple of months and get the feel of the different areas. anyplace else that you would recommend we check out?
As In stated earlier, we visit the Oaxaca Coast often from our home in San Cristóbal de Las Casas in the Chiapas Highlands. The Bays at Huatulco are nice but if your experience there is landing on a cruise ship you have a lot to learn. The place is a tourist trap filled with greatly overpriced real estate in a failed resort developed by the Mexican government and meant to be another Cancun but lacking Cancun´s Caribbean Sea assets. We dislike Puerto Angel and Puerto Escondido and would not dream of establishing residency in either place but that is just a matter of taste which is why you must visit these places and decide for yourselves over time.

Now, as I have earlier said, I have not visited Loreto and probablly never will but there is one thing of which I am certain. Neither the Gulf of Cortez nor the Pacific Ocean in Mexico will ever approach the Caribbean Coasts of Quintana Roo and Belize to say nothing of Guatemala and Honduras for crystal water beauty and incredible diving opportunities.

We would not even think of residing in Belize for a number of reasons but please enlighten us as to what caused you to tire of the place after 3 1/2 years. Surely you can play cards in Belize.

I am reminded of a fellow I met in Xcalak, Quintana Roo which is on a peninsula that eventually becomes Belize´ Ambergris Key after it crosses an artificial canal dug long ago by the Maya. Xcalak is a small isolated seaside village still showng the devastation of hurricanes of the past that virtually wiped it out but it remains a great place for deep sea fishimg and diving on the offshore reefs. I asked this fellow what there was to do in this totally isolated hamlet which is about a two to three hour drive from Chetumal and he responded, "Well, in the morning we arise and go fishing or diving and about mid-day we get drunk and then pass out. The next day we arise and repeat yesterday."
 

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As In stated earlier, we visit the Oaxaca Coast often from our home in San Cristóbal de Las Casas in the Chiapas Highlands. The Bays at Huatulco are nice but if your experience there is landing on a cruise ship you have a lot to learn. The place is a tourist trap filled with greatly overpriced real estate in a failed resort developed by the Mexican government and meant to be another Cancun but lacking Cancun´s Caribbean Sea assets. We dislike Puerto Angel and Puerto Escondido and would not dream of establishing residency in either place but that is just a matter of taste which is why you must visit these places and decide for yourselves over time.

Now, as I have earlier said, I have not visited Loreto and probablly never will but there is one thing of which I am certain. Neither the Gulf of Cortez nor the Pacific Ocean in Mexico will ever approach the Caribbean Coasts of Quintana Roo and Belize to say nothing of Guatemala and Honduras for crystal water beauty and incredible diving opportunities.

We would not even think of residing in Belize for a number of reasons but please enlighten us as to what caused you to tire of the place after 3 1/2 years. Surely you can play cards in Belize.

I am reminded of a fellow I met in Xcalak, Quintana Roo which is on a peninsula that eventually becomes Belize´ Ambergris Key after it crosses an artificial canal dug long ago by the Maya. Xcalak is a small isolated seaside village still showng the devastation of hurricanes of the past that virtually wiped it out but it remains a great place for deep sea fishimg and diving on the offshore reefs. I asked this fellow what there was to do in this totally isolated hamlet which is about a two to three hour drive from Chetumal and he responded, "Well, in the morning we arise and go fishing or diving and about mid-day we get drunk and then pass out. The next day we arise and repeat yesterday."
what do you not like about puerto escondido and puerto angel? what's it like where you live? there just is not enough to do here in belize...a little too quiet.
 

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what do you not like about puerto escondido and puerto angel? what's it like where you live? there just is not enough to do here in belize...a little too quiet.
I've read a bit on Belize, followed some forums. Some may not realize the lack of infrastructure in the country. Ambergris Caye sounds nice, but it's pricey. From what I've read violent crime is an issue. Most expats in Mexico can claim if they aren't in the drug trade then they feel as safe or safer than they feel in the States. Not so much in Belize. It may have improved but Belize recently only had 2 two lane highways in the country that intersected near the capital Belmopan. I don't believe there's a modern supermarket in the country. And it's very vulnerable to hurricanes. On the plus side in a country the size of New Jersey there's less than 350,000 people. There's plenty of wildlife. English is the official language.

To the OP there's an expat community in Puerto Escondido. A real plus is a new highway takes you fairly quickly from there to Oaxaca City. There's also a decent airport in P.E.. It's big enough to have some amenities and the other beaches mentioned aren't far for some variety. Google Tomzap forums for a very active forum on P.E.. Alot of silliness by regulars but they seem helpful. There are other active forums there for areas that may be worth considering. Good luck!
 

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Four or 5 hours hours on a twisting road is not what I would call a quick ride to Oaxaca, quicker than some other roads but I cannot wait for the new road to be finished, unfortuantely I probably will be dead befor they finish it.
Puerto Escondido is way too congested to be a nice beach town, it reminds me of the French Riviera, way too many people per square feet. If you do not mind a whole lot of expats and tourists it is the place on the coast. It has several beaches one very long and large with beautiful surf and a few small and more intimate, It has some beautiful vistas, expensive houses , lots of restaurants and congested streets, if you like this kind of place, it is the place where it is happening, Cheaper than the French Riviera and just as many Italians.

Huatulco is not my type of place either. La crucecita is a more" normal type of place" but you have to live in a place driven by the tourist economy where prices are quoted in dollars whern the ships come in. I asked them if we had somehow crossed a border and then they went back into pesos, The rate is kept simple 1 to 10. a coke is 10 pesos or a dollar..

We have some friends who lived there and moved to Melaque. They really miss Huatulco and are telling us the schools in Melaque are lousy compared to Huatulco where the kids are taught English from the Kindergarden.
Unfortunately for them business is way better for them on the Jalisco coast than on the Oaxaca Coast as business dies in the summer in Huatulco.
 

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This business of trying to name the best beach town is a non-serious debate that will never reach resolution because one´s favorite beach town is not only dependent upon one´s personal taste but, even then, one´s taste changes over time. I am a beach lover but, upon reflection, I note that:

When I was a kid, my parents always took us from our town in South Alabama to while away the summers at Mary Esther, Florida just outside of Fort Walton Beach to spend the season on Santa Rosa Sound and take daily trips to Tower Beach in Fort Walton and that was the best beach on the earth, Then, as a teenager I had to be at Panama City Beach just down the highway a hundred miles or so where drinking beer and raising hell and trying to pick up chicks was the rarely successful order of the day. Then, in my 20s, my beach was at Santa Monica, California and as I matured Santa Monica gave way to Carmel, California on Monterey Bay and then Carmel gave way to other beach areas in California from foggy Devil´s Slide just south of San Francisco to equally foggy Sea Ranch on the Sonoma Coast and on and on.

As for living on the beach, we did that in the 1980s living on a cliff overlooking the wild Pacific at Moss Beach, Californa for over ten years. The magnificent surf was constant and, frankly, overwhelming and the salt laden air destroyed everything from windows to appliances to our cars but that was the 80s and today it is 2013 and so we thought, when we heard of a beachfront house facing the Pacific in Playa Ventura, Guerrero and visited that house for a night to assess whether or not we might move to such an isolated ocean front area hours from both Puerto Escondido and Acapulco - the only cities of any size along that area in a region known as the Costa Chica - we realized during that one night there that that wild and constantly pounding Pacific surf was no longer for us.

Asking others what they think of places to live on the beach will get you nowhere. You're on your own.
 

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This business of trying to name the best beach town is a non-serious debate that will never reach resolution because one´s favorite beach town is not only dependent upon one´s personal taste but, even then, one´s taste changes over time. I am a beach lover but, upon reflection, I note that:

When I was a kid, my parents always took us from our town in South Alabama to while away the summers at Mary Esther, Florida just outside of Fort Walton Beach to spend the season on Santa Rosa Sound and take daily trips to Tower Beach in Fort Walton and that was the best beach on the earth, Then, as a teenager I had to be at Panama City Beach just down the highway a hundred miles or so where drinking beer and raising hell and trying to pick up chicks was the rarely successful order of the day. Then, in m 20s, my beach was at Santa Monica, California and as I matured Santa Monica gave way to Carmel, California on Monterey Bay and then Carmel gave way to other beach areas in California from foggy Devil´s Slide just south of San Francisco to equally foggy Sea Ranch on the Sonoma Coast and on and on.

As for living on the beach, we did that in the 1980s living on a cliff overlooking the wild Pacific at Moss Beach, Californa for over ten years. The magnificent surf was constant and, frankly, overwhelming and the salt laden air destroyed everything from windows to appliances to our cars but that was the 80s and today it is 2013 and so we thought, when we heard of a beachfront house facing the Pacific in Playa Ventura, Guerrero and visited that house for a night to assess whether or not we might move to such an isolated ocean front area hours from both Puerto Escondido and Acapulco - the only cities of any size along that area in a region known as the Costa Chica - we realized during that one night there that that wild and constantly pounding Pacific surf was no longer for us.

Asking others what they think of places to live on the beach will get you nowhere. You're on your own.
But letting them know about amenities, proximity to popular cities, air access, size of the expat community, etc can be a good starting point for determining what to check out. Some may want all that, others may want a small village and be the only foreigners there. Either way it's a starting point.
 

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In re: Laredo or Huatulco

luluder: Wow, took me awhile to register so that I could reply to your post. Just for you guys. My wife and I built a 2nd home in Huatulco (a five year project, finished last Dec), after living on the Baja peninsula for 20 years. So, let me lay just a few things out.

1. It's IMPOOSSIBLE to ever have clear title to any land on Baja. Baja was divided into 100 Ejitos over 100 years ago. The whole peninsula except for Puerto Escondito, Tijuana, and portions of Rosarita. These are sections of land that were filed on by "collectives" or groups of people. Those original ejitos still belong to every heir born within those families....in other words, sometimes thousands of people, and every individual has to sign away their rights to be able to sell a portion. Contact Stewart Title and ask. Thy are doing a landslide business "guaranteeing" title to land in Baja, which sometimes takes years. And STILL they print a disclaimer that they may not be guaranteeing title.

2. Lareto, while a great place, I really like it, can get very chilly in the winter. Fishing and boating is superb. The Sea of Cortez is magnificent in that area, stunning. Really great place. No working infrastructure, to speak of. That area also went through a 125 year drought that only ended in the early 1960's. There is now a reservoir and well just south and up in the mountains at Agua Prieta that pipes water to Lareto.

3: Huatulco's infra-structure is probably the best in Mexico. The tap water is drinkable. There are 3 modern sewage processing plants. The local population I estimate is around 20,000. Just right. For instance, there is only 1 Pemex station and yet it is never over-crowded, even during peak tourist season (Christmas to Easter). We even have a cinema multiplex. I digress, I assume you've been there, of course.

4. We had clear title (fe deCommiso) within 90 days of closing on our property. This is virtually impossible to do on the Baja. We have had friends who built a complete house only to be awakened in the middle of the night and evicted by Federales. Then, weeks later, escourted to the airport and told to leave the country.

I recommend Huatulco. But I do miss the Baja.

Larrs
 

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luluder: Wow, took me awhile to register so that I could reply to your post. Just for you guys. My wife and I built a 2nd home in Huatulco (a five year project, finished last Dec), after living on the Baja peninsula for 20 years. So, let me lay just a few things out.

1. It's IMPOOSSIBLE to ever have clear title to any land on Baja. Baja was divided into 100 Ejitos over 100 years ago. The whole peninsula except for Puerto Escondito, Tijuana, and portions of Rosarita. These are sections of land that were filed on by "collectives" or groups of people. Those original ejitos still belong to every heir born within those families....in other words, sometimes thousands of people, and every individual has to sign away their rights to be able to sell a portion. Contact Stewart Title and ask. Thy are doing a landslide business "guaranteeing" title to land in Baja, which sometimes takes years. And STILL they print a disclaimer that they may not be guaranteeing title.

2. Lareto, while a great place, I really like it, can get very chilly in the winter. Fishing and boating is superb. The Sea of Cortez is magnificent in that area, stunning. Really great place. No working infrastructure, to speak of. That area also went through a 125 year drought that only ended in the early 1960's. There is now a reservoir and well just south and up in the mountains at Agua Prieta that pipes water to Lareto.

3: Huatulco's infra-structure is probably the best in Mexico. The tap water is drinkable. There are 3 modern sewage processing plants. The local population I estimate is around 20,000. Just right. For instance, there is only 1 Pemex station and yet it is never over-crowded, even during peak tourist season (Christmas to Easter). We even have a cinema multiplex. I digress, I assume you've been there, of course.

4. We had clear title (fe deCommiso) within 90 days of closing on our property. This is virtually impossible to do on the Baja. We have had friends who built a complete house only to be awakened in the middle of the night and evicted by Federales. Then, weeks later, escourted to the airport and told to leave the country.

I recommend Huatulco. But I do miss the Baja.

Larrs
I've been there, and I find it expensive. We have land just West of PE and it is great...little tourists and 12 peso Victorias on the beach Palapas. Roca Blanca, El Venado and a few others closet to PE are great if you want the culture without paying the price. My wife is from Rio Grande. We spend about 2 months there every year (off and on collectively). I agree that PE is a little crowded and more for young tourists wanting the beach, bar, and surf scene. We go there to hang out and people watch, but 95% of our time is spent closer to Roca and El Venado.
 

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Larrs,
There are many pieces of land in Baja that are owned by the ejidos. There are pieces of land on the mainland that are owned by ejidos, as well. We live in the town of Loreto itself and have a good fideicomiso, just as sure and safe as the one that you have in Huatulco. Yes, there have been disputes and evictions from ejido land in Baja, mainly in the north. I have no concerns in the town of Loreto.
We don't have a reservoir, but we are served by a number of wells on the plain just north of here. Baja is a desert and water will always be an issue. The water we are tapping into is an ancient aquifer that is being used up faster than it can be replenished. Large developments in the area that could use up the water faster are a big concern among some of us here. I brush my teeth and cook with the tap water. I use garafons, the 5-gallon jugs, for drinking because it is delivered to my pantry for 10 pesos a jug.
Yes, the fishing is great. The water is awesome. It IS chilly in the winter and blistering in the summer. Not for everyone.
The development at Loreto Bay south of town will probably not be built out to the thousands of homes that were originally planned since the developer went under. But there is a large community there now. The poster might just like it there. They seem to have some activity or other going every day, at least during the winter season. Kind of like a big retirement community.
Like I say, completely different atmospheres, lifestyles, opportunities between Loreto and Huatulco.
 

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I've been there, and I find it expensive. We have land just West of PE and it is great...little tourists and 12 peso Victorias on the beach Palapas. Roca Blanca, El Venado and a few others closet to PE are great if you want the culture without paying the price. My wife is from Rio Grande. We spend about 2 months there every year (off and on collectively). I agree that PE is a little crowded and more for young tourists wanting the beach, bar, and surf scene. We go there to hang out and people watch, but 95% of our time is spent closer to Roca and El Venado.
By "I've been there and I find it expensive" you mean Huatulco? As with any location, one must learn the ropes. My beach palapas also have 12 peso Victorias. But they're not on the tourist beaches.
 

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By "I've been there and I find it expensive" you mean Huatulco? As with any location, one must learn the ropes. My beach palapas also have 12 peso Victorias. But they're not on the tourist beaches.
Yep..Huatulco. I try my hardest to stay away from Tourists (mostly Foreign) and Tourist beaches for any extended amount of time.

I like Huatulco. The Marina area is sort of cool, but off to the west and east are where the best places to relax are.....the food is unbelievable also! Gotta love Oaxaca. You can't go wrong.
 

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Yes the Costa Chica north west of PE is wonderful place to visit, I love the lagunes and the beaches, It is too quiet for us to live there all year round but a wonderful place to spend some vacations.
I also love some of the beaches between PE and Huatulco and some of the beaches between Salinas an Huatulco are not very developped and wonderful places to spend a couple of days if you like isolation.
 

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Yep..Huatulco. I try my hardest to stay away from Tourists (mostly Foreign) and Tourist beaches for any extended amount of time.

I like Huatulco. The Marina area is sort of cool, but off to the west and east are where the best places to relax are.....the food is unbelievable also! Gotta love Oaxaca. You can't go wrong.
Thanks for that. My wife and I have traveled throughout Mexico and for awhile were looking hard at the Yucatan area. But when we visited Huatulco, after the Day of The Dead in Ciudad Oaxaca 2007, we were impressed by the area, and very impressed by the infrastructure.

Our property, 2 blocks from a Tejoncito Bay, came with underground power, telephone, sewer, and water at the street. You can put the toilet paper in the toilet anywhere in this city!

From our house in Huatulco I can be at a beach with NOBODY on it, well, maybe a couple of fully clothed Mexicans, just down an non-descript dirt road, in 10 mins. no beach palapa bar, nothing. Or, in 10 mins, to Santa Cruz, the Marina area you mentioned, with 30 peso beers. Or, really funky beaches with palm palapas and beer out of a cooler for 12 pesos, farther west up coast. My kinda place. We live east of the Marina area, east of Tangolunda, just before Copalita.

Hope you took no offense about land ownership on Baja. 20 yrs in CSL, when I first started living there in a trailer park called San Vincente, directly across from the Country Club) there was only 1500 people and 3 hotels in Cabo San Lucas. None of the hotels were huge, although later they became so. The Twin Dolphins, The Hacienda, and the original Finestera on the Pacific side of the arch.

My wife and I tried several times to purchase land, in Cabo, Los Barrilles, and Todos Santos area. We became over-educated about the Baja peninsula, Baja Sur, but by default, also the Frontera, or Norther Baja. I truly believe its damn near impossible to get a good title in Baja. Maybe Im wrong.

The Los Cabos year round population is now close to 500,000! Had to get out.

So...do you have a hand shake deal for your land or do you have a actual Recorded in Mexico City Fe de Comiso? Or Off-shore corporation?

Larrs
 
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