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Hello everyone,
I'm finishing up my PhD in research psychology sometime early next year and I am planning on finding a job teaching and doing research at a university in France, (or any of the other French speaking countries) Belgium, Switzerland or Luxembourg.

I understand that they have the requirement that all non EU citizens must be able to prove that they are applying for a position that no other EU citizen can fill, and I think that shouldn't be a problem with my specialization (I have research and university teaching experience in cultural studies, & statistical literacy). So I'm not too worried about competing for an EU citizen's position, because my research requires me to bring an outside perspective to the university in the first place.

What I am curious about is this: :fingerscrossed:
When should I start seriously applying for a work permit, or when should I start applying for anything relating to working in the EU (or Switzerland)?
I won't have my final degree in my hands until next spring, so I was thinking of waiting until then to begin applying for positions (I wanted to have the degree completely done, in case there are any problems with my current program).

What should be the first thing that I should apply for in this situation, or do you think that I should just try to get a job over there first of all?

Any help or opinions would be greatly appreciated!
 

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From the US...lived in Canada, UK, & France
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...What should be the first thing...
Jeffrey

First, your prospective employer must prove no one in the entire EU can do the job for which it wants to hire you, as you've said. The employer must also be approved to hire a non-EU person. As a result, you don't need to worry about applying for a work visa (the university will handle that). You just have to get hired. The process is quite similar in the US, by the way.

Second, you'll almost certainly need to be fluent in French (or the languages of the country in which you're hired to teach) in order to be considered. While there may be the odd exception, speaking the language well enough to teach and conduct your research is critical (imagine someone who speaks / reads only French or German expecting to find and fill a research & teaching position in the US. How would that person teach American students? How could s/he conduct research without being able to read English?).

I think those are the two biggest things you'll need to confront in order to achieve what you want.

Best of luck.

Ray
 

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ESCs (École supérieure de commerce) accept profs who speak not good French. At Rouen ESC I taught "management" in English, although I could speak reasonable French. I tried teaching in French but it was really hard work and all my knowledge and experience is in English. I think that some ESCs have profs visiting for a year on an exchange basis, but I don't know how formal the arrangements were.

Some ESCs offer "English only" courses so that may be of interest to you. On the other hand ESCs tend to focus on "hard" business related subjects and I don't think any are really into psychology in a big way.

If you did not know the ESCs consider themselves superior to universities, so don't confuse the two!

DejW
 

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In the circles of the wide and intelligent people studying for a PhD there is a saying:

"Publish (your thesis) in English and be criticised, publish in French and be ignored"

I'm not in the PhD world - although I did review a draft PhD thesis for a friend.


It is my opinion that many "professional students" who end up getting
 

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As folks here have already mentioned, you don't apply for a work permit or visa - your employer-to-be does, provided they can get the clearance. They may also choose to apply for a "researcher or scientific" visa instead of an "employee" visa because researchers are a somewhat privileged class here in France.

That said, however, you're more likely to be considered for a research post fresh out of school. Many/most of the universities here are state run and teaching jobs are considered a part of the civil service and thus much more available to French and EU nationals.

By all means, start your job search now. Things tend to move kind of slowly in France on the hiring front and you need to have a firm offer before the employer can start things in motion to get work permit approval and start your visa. (And I think you'll find this to true in most of the other countries in the EU.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Hello everyone,
I'm finishing up my PhD in research psychology sometime early next year and I am planning on finding a job teaching and doing research at a university in France, (or any of the other French speaking countries) Belgium, Switzerland or Luxembourg.

I understand that they have the requirement that all non EU citizens must be able to prove that they are applying for a position that no other EU citizen can fill, and I think that shouldn't be a problem with my specialization (I have research and university teaching experience in cultural studies, & statistical literacy). So I'm not too worried about competing for an EU citizen's position, because my research requires me to bring an outside perspective to the university in the first place.

What I am curious about is this: :fingerscrossed:
When should I start seriously applying for a work permit, or when should I start applying for anything relating to working in the EU (or Switzerland)?
I won't have my final degree in my hands until next spring, so I was thinking of waiting until then to begin applying for positions (I wanted to have the degree completely done, in case there are any problems with my current program).

What should be the first thing that I should apply for in this situation, or do you think that I should just try to get a job over there first of all?

Any help or opinions would be greatly appreciated!
In Switzerland also the job comes first then the work permit applied for by your company. German is the regional language where I work (Zürich), though you might think English is at times it's understood and spoken everywhere. Universities run courses in English (as they do in Germany and Belgium. That said, not knowing how special your speciality is, in my company/field (Engineering) there are quite a few mid twenty to mid thirties Phds, it seems to be the qualification level some of my colleagues (German/Swiss/French/Italian Spanish/Greek etc) consider a minimum, so competition may be a little stiffer than you imagine.
I hear American accents all the time but they all seem to be in banking/insurance in Bale and Zürich.
If you want French speaking area of Switzerland specifically then you need to look at South and West of Switzerland (Geneva/Berne).

Good Luck
 
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