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Hello all,

I am scheduled to move in a few months to Paris. I was told by my company that they will let me live in Paris but my office will be in London and I will be paid in Pounds. I am in sales and will cover most of Europe. I am also about to get my Hungarian (EU) passport.

I now need to start reviewing all the UK tax laws, etc. But my question is will I need to pay any taxes in France? Will I have the same access to healthcare there as if I worked in France? Will I need an actual France work contract to get an apartment and get an EU family Visa? How else will I be deprived for having pay stubs from UK instead of France?
 

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You're putting yourself into a tricky situation by living in Paris and commuting to London for a UK based job. What would be ideal is for your company to treat you as a "border hopper" i.e. to pay French cotisations on your behalf into the French system. But most UK based companies aren't keen to do that sort of thing because it means having a French presence and paying the french employer's portion of the social insurances, which are pretty high.

The reason landlords want a French employment contract is because your salary would be deposited in a French bank and most landlords want the rent put on automatic debit so there is no doubt about them being paid.

As far as the taxes go, there appear to be some arrangements that can be made whereby someone being paid in the UK but living in France still pays their taxes and social insurances to the UK. That's normally done in the case where a UK citizen or resident moves to France while working for a UK company. The fact of your not having UK residence prior to your move may complicate the situation a bit.

But to live in France, you won't need an EU family visa. If you have your Hungarian passport, you can live and work in France with little or no difficulty. You may want to consult early on with the French tax authorities, though, to determine what your situation is with regard to income taxes.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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