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Hi folks, this is my first post and this seemed like a good thread to start with. We are hoping to come out to Cyprus in the next few months (2 people, 1 cat), and really, were wondering if £3000 is going to be enough to get us started. We want to, if possible, rent for about six months to start with, and in that time get jobs and integrate. We also have monthly private pensions of around £500 per month. We know both ends of the island well, and try chatting to the locals with our limited Greek when we can.
Really would like your views on if this is a going concern or not.

Thanks
JudyAnne
 

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Hi,
I've moved your message to a thread of its own as it is not part of the topic of the thread you posted in.

Anyway, welcome to the forum.

I don't think £3000 will be enough to get you started, even with pensions of around £500 per month. For a start you will need to show immigration that you are of 'independant means' and that is most effective if you have €10,000 as a lump sum or more in a bank in Cyprus (plus pensions). If you intend to enter Cyprus as potential workers you will need to pay Social Insurance too. In addition, when you start renting you will need to pay several months in advance, exactly how much depends on the rental company you use. Your rent is likely to be in the region of €500 per month plus bills. Depending on whether you rent fully furnished or not, you may need to provide furniture and household goods. And of course you will need to stock your cupboards and eat! You will probably want to buy a car (unless you bring your own) and even a wreck costs €2000 plus.

As regards jobs, I am sure you will have seen that the job situation in Cyprus is very bad. I read in the paper that unemployment is running at close to double the usual figure. The tourist industry is ailing because the British market provides the highest proportion of visitors and the Brits have just not been holidaying in the same numbers for the last 18months. It is hoped that the tourist industry will improve this summer but its not very likely until there is a real turn round in the UK economy. Without the tourists there is less money floating around in Cyprus, less jobs, less spending. As you will see when you look around the forum, the jobs that are available go first to relatives and friends of locals, Greek speakers and then anybody else. Being realistic, the chances of you getting jobs are very limited in the short term.

I am sorry to have to say this, but you did ask the question and its better to say it how it is! Sorry
 

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Hi folks, this is my first post and this seemed like a good thread to start with. We are hoping to come out to Cyprus in the next few months (2 people, 1 cat), and really, were wondering if £3000 is going to be enough to get us started. We want to, if possible, rent for about six months to start with, and in that time get jobs and integrate. We also have monthly private pensions of around £500 per month. We know both ends of the island well, and try chatting to the locals with our limited Greek when we can.
Really would like your views on if this is a going concern or not.

Thanks
JudyAnne
It would be extremely risky to start a new life with such a small financial cushion - there are some cheaper rents available, but you would be living in the lower end of the market, and it probably would be quite a distance from the imagined dream. I think Bab's advice is spot on. Read through the threads on cost of living, and moving over to judge the level of risk. I hate to sound harsh, but you would need to cut back on obvious expenses - bringing a cat over is very expensive and complicates things considerably should you decide to come and then have to return. Vets bills and pet food are are high. Depending on where you live, there is also a reasonable risk of a cat being poisoned and also (if you are cat lovers) a 100% guarantee that you will be adopted by local cats (there are thousands of them, which is why many end up being poisoned as they can be unberable during the mating season and keep whole neigbourhoods awake and quite a few innocent pets get caught in the 'cross fire' each year.

You can not rely on getting jobs - there are very few around, and those that are available pay very little. Unless you can survive on pensions, or other forms of income, I would advise against taking the plunge - remember too that unless you are paying into the social fund, medical expenses also have to be factored in - there are no welfare safety nets in Cyprus.
 
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