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Our local LIDL were on strike on Thursday supporting the strikers at the warehouse near Aix en Provence.
I respect Elise Lucet and her team for what they do, even if I fell asleep near the end of the LIDL episode and awoke at the beginning of Free.

Yes, the workers employed by LIDL are people, real human beings. Let's have a little compassion for them, smile, chat, laugh and not treat them like robots, please ?
 

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Wasn't there a book a few years ago written by a woman who had worked as a cashier in a big super market in France? She documented how nasty people were to the cashiers in general.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wasn't there a book a few years ago written by a woman who had worked as a cashier in a big super market in France? She documented how nasty people were to the cashiers in general.
Cheers,
Bev
I think it's important to have watched the program to understand that there are some dire issues at Lidl, most particularly in their warehouses.

I think the program was really important in that it brought these issues to light, as well as the attitude of the company (which must surely have always known what the impacts were likely to be).
 

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Look at the mess Ryanair are in with all their pilots and staff leaving on mass.

Low cost means basically means that the company can treat their staff like shît.

But it is the consumer that is to blame !!
 

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The program is still available on the France 2 website to view. Started watching it - but will have to return to it later, as it's pretty long ( nearly 2 hours).

What I did see was pretty much in keeping with other such exposés I've seen in the past. There are definitely different expectations here in the job market - and in the matter of consumer expectations regarding shops and services they use. Even in the States, however, I've always been of the opinion that no one has to take any job that they are offered - that the whole employment process is one of a two-sided bargaining process. There are employers who (quite rightly) have difficulty recruiting people to work for them because of their nasty reputations. I will, however, go back when I have a bit more time to watch the whole program. I did note, however, that one of the early-on "issues" was the thing about expecting the cashier to be "polyvalant." That seems to be a particularly sensitive point here in France, whereas elsewhere, it's just expected that an employee keep busy while they are on the job.

Happened to stumble onto a site where people were posting evaluations of the new Costco here in France - and it was interesting to see some of the French reactions. Costco has always been held up as an exemplary employer in the US - especially in comparison with their competitor, Walmart. Most of the reviews of the French store are very much in agreement and cite the friendly, helpful staff. However a couple of the reviews appear to be "incensed" by the controls on entry and departure from the store - which I've never found to be anything but brief and courteous. In fact, the last time I was leaving, one of the "security" people followed me to mention that the "potatoes" in my cart seemed to have a lot of "spots" on them, and that if I wanted, I could change them out for a bag in better condition. Actually, they were sweet potatoes, which tend to have spots on the skins that peel off with no sort of blemish or bad spot underneath. But I thanked the guy for his concern and sure enough, when I got home, the "spots" peeled off with no damage under the skin.

Anyhow - I'll comment further when I've had a chance to see the entire program. (I do agree that our local Lidl is kind of "grungy" and for that reason I rarely shop there. But I can say the same thing for the local Leader Price, too, so I drive further to shop at SuperU.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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The program is still available on the France 2 website to view. Started watching it - but will have to return to it later, as it's pretty long ( nearly 2 hours).

What I did see was pretty much in keeping with other such exposés I've seen in the past. There are definitely different expectations here in the job market - and in the matter of consumer expectations regarding shops and services they use. Even in the States, however, I've always been of the opinion that no one has to take any job that they are offered - that the whole employment process is one of a two-sided bargaining process. There are employers who (quite rightly) have difficulty recruiting people to work for them because of their nasty reputations. I will, however, go back when I have a bit more time to watch the whole program. I did note, however, that one of the early-on "issues" was the thing about expecting the cashier to be "polyvalant." That seems to be a particularly sensitive point here in France, whereas elsewhere, it's just expected that an employee keep busy while they are on the job.

Happened to stumble onto a site where people were posting evaluations of the new Costco here in France - and it was interesting to see some of the French reactions. Costco has always been held up as an exemplary employer in the US - especially in comparison with their competitor, Walmart. Most of the reviews of the French store are very much in agreement and cite the friendly, helpful staff. However a couple of the reviews appear to be "incensed" by the controls on entry and departure from the store - which I've never found to be anything but brief and courteous. In fact, the last time I was leaving, one of the "security" people followed me to mention that the "potatoes" in my cart seemed to have a lot of "spots" on them, and that if I wanted, I could change them out for a bag in better condition. Actually, they were sweet potatoes, which tend to have spots on the skins that peel off with no sort of blemish or bad spot underneath. But I thanked the guy for his concern and sure enough, when I got home, the "spots" peeled off with no damage under the skin.

Anyhow - I'll comment further when I've had a chance to see the entire program. (I do agree that our local Lidl is kind of "grungy" and for that reason I rarely shop there. But I can say the same thing for the local Leader Price, too, so I drive further to shop at SuperU.)
Cheers,
Bev
Oh, I think you really need to continue to watch and then come back with comments. It's what you haven't seen yet that is really, really disturbing. So, watch the whole of the Lidl story and then give us your comments :)
 

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Wasn't there a book a few years ago written by a woman who had worked as a cashier in a big super market in France? She documented how nasty people were to the cashiers in general. Cheers, Bev
Quite right.
"Les tribulations d'une caissière" by Anna Sam
DEA de lettres modernes and no job in that line of work.
I watched her TV interview some years ago and made a mental note of her book but never found it on sale. Online library.
 

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I will, however, go back when I have a bit more time to watch the whole program. I did note, however, that one of the early-on "issues" was the thing about expecting the cashier to be "polyvalant." That seems to be a particularly sensitive point here in France, whereas elsewhere, it's just expected that an employee keep busy while they are on the job.
This aspect of employment in France, expecting a staff member to be polyvalent, was one of the major things that surprised me when we arrived in France in 2005. Having myself been a 'caissière' in the UK whilst a student I remember that I was forbidden to leave my post/till unless there was an emergency and, if there was, then I had to take my cash drawer with me !
Nowadays it seems most staff in shops, supermarkets etc need to be polyvalent. If there are no customers about then they are required to sweep the floor, restock the shelves, clean the shelves .. whatever is needed.
In the UK paid-for cleaners usually come in in the evening to clean and the restocking of shelves also takes place then by staff brought in for that purpose.
From a health point of view it's no wonder that the supermarket staff here are mostly fit and slim as they get plenty of exercise during their working hours.

Sue
 
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