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Newbie here. I found this site by Googling "US NAVY retired in the Philippines" but after registering couldn't find any specific "group" of such interest.

I'm retired U.S. Navy. Met my wife in Olongapo. Been married 22 yrs. Currently live in California. We Built a two story concrete home in the Su-ay barrio of Himamaylan in 2002. Home is currently occupied by her youngest brother who lives in the house and takes care of their mother.

She has 4 older brothers who also live in Su-ay. I want to retire to the Province in the next three or so years. My asawa has reservations. She thinks living close to her family only invites problems. That may be. But my concerns lie elsewhere.

Looking for tips from other USN retirees regarding cost of living (my current pension is $1,350), and how I will receive that pension in the P.I.? Or more to the point I guess, how do U.S.N. RETIRED receive your pension? Can I expect to live comfortably and have enough left over to enjoy some local travel? Let's start with those questions, and get the ball (network) rolling from there.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum.

I cannot answer your questions with regards to receiving your pension here but i am sure some of your fellow american retirees can help you with that one.

With regards to your pension and whether you can live comfortably, it is more than enough depending on what living standards you are after. Your $1,350 equates to just under 60,000 pesos per month at the current exchange rate.

I am not sure if you plan to live in the house you built or are looking to rent elsewhere? Rent will obviously be your biggest monthly expense and can range from as little as 4,000 peso per month right up to 35,000 for a condo. Electric will cost you around 3-4,000 a month depending on how much you use the aircon. Food is cheap and you could live on between 8-10,000 a month with that.

So all in all you could live here for as low as 20,000 per month leaving you almost two thirds of your pension left. It all just depends on the quality and standard of life that you are after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks MikeynJenz for the warm welcome. I suppose my idea of living comfortably means to be well fed and able to entertain myself. Having a good internet connection, satellite TV, and access to a local market for fresh fruits and vegetables and plenty of good seafood should foot the bill. I suppose I’d spend the rest of my time doing projects around the property sprucing the place up, gardening, etcetera and possibly so local travel around the islands.

Maybe take up some snorkeling and hiking, though that’s probably just wishful thinking on my part. I’m 57 and out of shape after sitting behind a desk for the past twenty years.

Yes, I’m thinking we would most likely live in the house we’ve already built. Actually she supervised the build on one of her vacations back home. I’ve never been to her province and my only experience in the Philippines is of Subic Bay and Olongapo/Angeles City most recently in 1989. And that was mostly the inside of a bar.
 

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Thanks MikeynJenz for the warm welcome. I suppose my idea of living comfortably means to be well fed and able to entertain myself. Having a good internet connection, satellite TV, and access to a local market for fresh fruits and vegetables and plenty of good seafood should foot the bill. I suppose I’d spend the rest of my time doing projects around the property sprucing the place up, gardening, etcetera and possibly so local travel around the islands.

Maybe take up some snorkeling and hiking, though that’s probably just wishful thinking on my part. I’m 57 and out of shape after sitting behind a desk for the past twenty years.

Yes, I’m thinking we would most likely live in the house we’ve already built. Actually she supervised the build on one of her vacations back home. I’ve never been to her province and my only experience in the Philippines is of Subic Bay and Olongapo/Angeles City most recently in 1989. And that was mostly the inside of a bar.
Well that takes away the renting aspect as you only have to pay the tax on the property which is usually very small. You have no worries then regarding being able to live comfotably as your 60,000 will pay 3-4,000 on electric, cable is available for between 500 - 1,200, and internet is around 2-4,000 depending on the sort of speeds you are after.

So thats a top end estimate of about 10,000 to cover most bills, water is around 300-500 a month and your property tax should be a similar amount i believe.

That leaves you 50,000 to eat and enjoy life which is more than enough. For the two of us i tend to spend no more than 10,000 on groceries a month at the mall, though many foods can be found cheaper at a local market.

So lets say 40k spare change, enough to have some fun and perhaps get some savings together.

I live on a similar amount to you (though have to pay rent), and we do well. We can afford to go on short holidays to other Asian countries, do a little bit of travelling around the Philippines and have plenty of days out to do things or nights out to enjoy a few drinks.

Perhaps someone else here can help you with your pension and getting it here, i am sure i have read a thread somewhere on that before.
 

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US Navy retired

Newbie here. I found this site by Googling "US NAVY retired in the Philippines" but after registering couldn't find any specific "group" of such interest.

I'm retired U.S. Navy. Met my wife in Olongapo. Been married 22 yrs. Currently live in California. We Built a two story concrete home in the Su-ay barrio of Himamaylan in 2002. Home is currently occupied by her youngest brother who lives in the house and takes care of their mother.

She has 4 older brothers who also live in Su-ay. I want to retire to the Province in the next three or so years. My asawa has reservations. She thinks living close to her family only invites problems. That may be. But my concerns lie elsewhere.

Looking for tips from other USN retirees regarding cost of living (my current pension is $1,350), and how I will receive that pension in the P.I.? Or more to the point I guess, how do U.S.N. RETIRED receive your pension? Can I expect to live comfortably and have enough left over to enjoy some local travel? Let's start with those questions, and get the ball (network) rolling from there.

Thanks in advance.
Hi 24carat gold! Welcome...

I'm retired US Navy and living in the lower Laguna area.

To live here I would start working with your Philippine consulate in the states here's a short cut to which consulate serves your state

Embassy of the Philippines - Consulate Finder Map

Each Philippine consulate has it's own downloadable forms, once you get all your Visa and I-Card papwerwork completed, here's the short cut to Philippine Bureau of Immigration

The Bureau of Immigration, Philippines Official Website - ALIEN CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION

You will use the down load forms, check list of things to do from Philippine Consulate in the states.

Once you have that you can open a bank account here and either cash checks with bank or set up a monthly deposit from military account. Using money changers is not cool in remote area's because the exchange rates are about 7 peso's less per dollar it can hurt the wallet, Manila probably has better exchange rates but if you don't live there then a bank is a must, banks won't allow you to open an account with out card and the Philippines wants foreigners to use their I-card or Immigrant card.

It's a process getting the card it takes two months to get your passport stamped with Philippine Visa, sometime less and then once you arrive in the Philippines you have I think 7 days to get your card, lol... another process that can take up one day, could be some running around it's not a one stop shop the PBI they have their own requirements not listed and their own doctors in a separate but nearby area, they have to stamp your clearance also before issuing you a card.

Once you get your card then you can find a good bank, they will require you to bring in your passport, and photo copies, of you and wife to open bank account with $500 minimum deposit and the waiting time is 30 days not counting holidays those are extra before you can withdraw money, lol..... I had to build up my balance so I just withdraw on the 1st, you can take out your deposit and they charge you a $10 fee, depositing check charge is 100 peso's.
 

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Newbie here. I found this site by Googling "US NAVY retired in the Philippines" but after registering couldn't find any specific "group" of such interest.

I'm retired U.S. Navy. Met my wife in Olongapo. Been married 22 yrs. Currently live in California. We Built a two story concrete home in the Su-ay barrio of Himamaylan in 2002. Home is currently occupied by her youngest brother who lives in the house and takes care of their mother.

She has 4 older brothers who also live in Su-ay. I want to retire to the Province in the next three or so years. My asawa has reservations. She thinks living close to her family only invites problems. That may be. But my concerns lie elsewhere.

Looking for tips from other USN retirees regarding cost of living (my current pension is $1,350), and how I will receive that pension in the P.I.? Or more to the point I guess, how do U.S.N. RETIRED receive your pension? Can I expect to live comfortably and have enough left over to enjoy some local travel? Let's start with those questions, and get the ball (network) rolling from there.

Thanks in advance.
Hello and welcome!
Small world! I have been residing in Bacolod City since 2005. While my wife's family is from here, one of her Uncls is a resident there in Su-ay!
Your pension should be more than adequate to meet your needs (so long as you're not trying to support the clan)!
 

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Newbie here. I found this site by Googling "US NAVY retired in the Philippines" but after registering couldn't find any specific "group" of such interest.

I'm retired U.S. Navy. Met my wife in Olongapo. Been married 22 yrs. Currently live in California. We Built a two story concrete home in the Su-ay barrio of Himamaylan in 2002. Home is currently occupied by her youngest brother who lives in the house and takes care of their mother.

She has 4 older brothers who also live in Su-ay. I want to retire to the Province in the next three or so years. My asawa has reservations. She thinks living close to her family only invites problems. That may be. But my concerns lie elsewhere.

Looking for tips from other USN retirees regarding cost of living (my current pension is $1,350), and how I will receive that pension in the P.I.? Or more to the point I guess, how do U.S.N. RETIRED receive your pension? Can I expect to live comfortably and have enough left over to enjoy some local travel? Let's start with those questions, and get the ball (network) rolling from there.

Thanks in advance.
My first tour 1984-87 was on the USNS Chauvenet home ported in Subic Bay, I was a Helicopter SAR crewmen, met my wife on my next tour in Whidbey Island WA.

Living comfortably would mean a more remote spot away from larger cities and tourist traps, I live in and around Pagsanjuan Falls, very cheap area to live in, malls are minutes away and Sta Cruz is almost a sister city, I do my banking in Sta Cruz Laguna, I live in a remote Municipality and it has broadband internet.
 

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Part of my total monthly pension is direct deposited in my US Bank acct. Another is direct deposited, by the US Government (via CitiBank) into my US Dollar account at a bank here in the Philippines. If I want to transfer from the US Bank to the Philippine Bank, I just write myself a check on the US acct and deposit it to my Philippine account! It takes 15 business days to be available here!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the estimates regarding utility costs and monthly food budget for two. We are currently supporting her brother and mother at $200 a month and they seem to be getting by okay on that; though I'm sure I would have to install air conditioning once I expatriate there. I think the wife sends extra when the property taxes come due but as you alluded to, I recall it wasn't very much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My first tour 1984-87 was on the USNS Chauvenet home ported in Subic Bay, I was a Helicopter SAR crewmen, met my wife on my next tour in Whidbey Island WA.

Living comfortably would mean a more remote spot away from larger cities and tourist traps, I live in and around Pagsanjuan Falls, very cheap area to live in, malls are minutes away and Sta Cruz is almost a sister city, I do my banking in Sta Cruz Laguna, I live in a remote Municipality and it has broadband internet.
My first duty station was in Whidbey from 1973-1976. VA-165 "Boomers". Oak Harbor was a nice little community. I'm definitely not a fan of the big city.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Part of my total monthly pension is direct deposited in my US Bank acct. Another is direct deposited, by the US Government (via CitiBank) into my US Dollar account at a bank here in the Philippines. If I want to transfer from the US Bank to the Philippine Bank, I just write myself a check on the US acct and deposit it to my Philippine account! It takes 15 business days to be available here!
Thanks for the information. Is it simply a matter of providing the P.I. account information to DFAS to change direct deposit to say... BDO? I understand the USG is cracking down lately on overseas banks to track down tax evaders. And some foreign banks wont accept accounts from U.S. citizens. Any problem accessing DFAS website from where you live? I also contribute to Tricare Prime and Delta Dental, I'm guessing that's not going to work over there.
 

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Thanks for the information. Is it simply a matter of providing the P.I. account information to DFAS to change direct deposit to say... BDO? I understand the USG is cracking down lately on overseas banks to track down tax evaders. And some foreign banks wont accept accounts from U.S. citizens. Any problem accessing DFAS website from where you live? I also contribute to Tricare Prime and Delta Dental, I'm guessing that's not going to work over there.
IDD (international direct deposit) to Philippine Banks is done by US Treasury for SSA benefits but DFAS doesn't list the Philippines on their list of countries where this is available. Their list says it was last updated in August 2012 and that if a country is not listed to make a written inquirey to them. You may need to just open an acct here, keeping your US acct and do the personal check as the least expensive transfer method. You'd need to start with enough here to more than cover the lag time in check clearing though!
Another member mentioned that he just uses his USAA bank card to withdraw via ATM as he gets a number of fee free uses each month!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hello and welcome!
Small world! I have been residing in Bacolod City since 2005. While my wife's family is from here, one of her Uncls is a resident there in Su-ay!
Your pension should be more than adequate to meet your needs (so long as you're not trying to support the clan)!
Bacolod, now we're getting closer to home. You say your wife's uncle is in Su-ay? He must own his own business there, I can't see leaving the providential capital for the barrio life otherwise. Perhaps he knows some of the Rallos' that live there, that's my wife's maiden name. As I mentioned earlier, she has four brothers and of course all the nieces, nephews and cousins.

"Not supporting the whole clan", I think, is my wife's biggest problem with the idea of retiring to Su-ay. That, and I think she's become "americanized". She got here (CA) in '91 and has been back to visit on four or five occasions. Her last visit was in 2010.

I tell her that if you just say No enough times, they'll stop asking. She's more Kuripot though and I have a very generous heart. I'd want to help her family as much as I could and she seems to think they've already "tasted" her hard work.

Well sir, thanks again for your posts. Take care.
 

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Bacolod, now we're getting closer to home. You say your wife's uncle is in Su-ay? He must own his own business there, I can't see leaving the providential capital for the barrio life otherwise. Perhaps he knows some of the Rallos' that live there, that's my wife's maiden name. As I mentioned earlier, she has four brothers and of course all the nieces, nephews and cousins.

"Not supporting the whole clan", I think, is my wife's biggest problem with the idea of retiring to Su-ay. That, and I think she's become "americanized". She got here (CA) in '91 and has been back to visit on four or five occasions. Her last visit was in 2010.

I tell her that if you just say No enough times, they'll stop asking. She's more Kuripot though and I have a very generous heart. I'd want to help her family as much as I could and she seems to think they've already "tasted" her hard work.

Well sir, thanks again for your posts. Take care.
No, not a business owner. Retired. His oldest son is an OFW and younger son works in local the market.
I'll inquire. His family name is, Nolido.
There's nothing wrong, here or in US with helping out a family member on a case by case basis and as you can afford it but best to limit it and not make it a direct hand out if you do so!
 
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