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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I'm a guy and have been reading the forum for sometime - it's quite interesting - as I fancy sometimes an expat life in LOS.
Some people I know quit everything then moved to Canada, only to come back 2 years later as they did not adapt.
I took some time off from work and I've just arrived in Bkk and I will be staying for about 6 weeks, if things go as planned. So I will know for real if I really like to be here or no.

First of all I must say that my image about living here has already started to change, after 24 hours, and it will probably continue to do so...not for better or worse...

Money: I thought Thailand is cheap...well, it is cheaper than Europe or USA, but not that cheap.For example I went out to a beer place and a beer was about 3.5 USD.
Street food is very cheap and tasty, and I like spicy asian food. Lucky me, otherwise it seems that European food is more expensive.
Found a place to stay, for about 300 usd/month plus utilities - not bad but not luxury either - if I wanted something good for me+family it would probably be about 700 USD-1000 USD/month.


Language: It's my first time when I am in a country where I cannot even read the name of the street; tried to talk english to some people, they also tried but nothing came out. I did get frustrated when I could make myself understood...

City: compared to an European/American city or English countryside, it is quite unappealing. It might be an acquired taste, so I'll give it a try.
I also plan a trip to Krabi, and maybe Kanchanaburi - where I hope the scenery will be nicer.

Ladies: they seem cute and they all look young, we'll see more the next days.:)

Vicente
 
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You can get a beer for a lot cheaper in the provinces, Chiang Mai for example. Likewise accommodation, depending on the standards you need. I was paying around 300 USD pm for a furnished three-bedroomed house in a central location in Chiang Mai for a couple of years, two different properties.

But yes, it's not so cheap unless you know what you are doing - if you cook for yourself, or only frequent Thai restaurants and street vendors, find the places that don't rip you off for a beer, and don't get too generous with the ladies, you can get by very reasonably!

Language is a problem - very few people speak English, except in the tourist areas. Buy a phrasebook, it's good fun trying to communicate in Thai, and they appreciate it.

Bangkok city - brash, noisy, polluted, but fun about sums it up. I can handle a few days before I need to escape - I much prefer Chiang Mai. If you've got six weeks, why not head up north?

The ladies, cute? Really? Never thought about it. For the first thirty seconds after I set foot in the country, anyway ;)

Have a great time :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply!
I will buy a phrase book...
I am making some training here in Bangkok for about 4 weeks, then I will go for one week south to Krabi (I have a friend living and working there), then I will probably be broke and leave earlier...
 

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Bangkok is like many other big cities.Dirty,noisy,polluted,more expensive then outside of the city and congested.I think you will find Krabi more to your likeing if you are like me and hate the city.But it is also an expensive area to live in next to the gulf and all.The Issan area is the cheapest by far.You can get just about everything in Issan that you can get in Bangkok.As long as you live around Korat,Udon Thani or Ubon Thani. It is a much more relaxed area of Thailand. The north around Chaing Mai is a great place to live and cheaper then Bangkok and the gulf or ocean areas but more costly then Issan.Also much less english is spoken.In Issan that is. But just get out and travel around Thailand to see for yourself.Enjoy your time here.
 

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As a Yankee who has lived overseas on a couple of occasions, I know what you are saying. I moved to Paris only speaking schoolboy French, and found the "separation" that occurs from not speaking the language at a high level insurmountable. I believe the initial rush that comes from living in a place that is exotic and cheap wears off. I have also found that the cost savings are often eaten up by the fact that you are a foreigner. For me, it comes down to "can I do the things that I like to do" - somewhat simplistic, but it works for me. My suggestion is to spend enough time there so that when you are an old man you won't have any regrets, and you can have some good memories in the event you decide not to stay. Good luck!
 
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As a Yankee who has lived overseas on a couple of occasions, I know what you are saying. I moved to Paris only speaking schoolboy French, and found the "separation" that occurs from not speaking the language at a high level insurmountable. I believe the initial rush that comes from living in a place that is exotic and cheap wears off. I have also found that the cost savings are often eaten up by the fact that you are a foreigner. For me, it comes down to "can I do the things that I like to do" - somewhat simplistic, but it works for me. My suggestion is to spend enough time there so that when you are an old man you won't have any regrets, and you can have some good memories in the event you decide not to stay. Good luck!
Definitely the initial rush wears off eventually for most of us, when you are living there permanently. It can take a few months, or it can take a year or two, but in the end you start to take things for granted.

A good friend of mine has an interesting method for surmounting this problem! He is self-employed, from the UK. He simply works like a dog for two or three months, rarely goes out, doesn't drink, saves every penny... until he has enough set by for a couple of months in Chiang Mai, where he proceeds to have a crazy and generally debauched time until the money runs out and he has to go home and start working again. He's done this for years now, and his enthusiasm never runs out! Ok it's not for everyone - some of us like to have a little security - but for him at least, the rush never seems to wear off :)

Will he ever have any regrets? I doubt it, and at the same time I doubt he'll ever get old enough to worry that he didn't save money for a rainy day, a pension. He has every intention of going out in the midst of having the greatest time possible :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A good friend of mine has an interesting method for surmounting this problem! He is self-employed, from the UK. He simply works like a dog for two or three months, rarely goes out, doesn't drink, saves every penny... until he has enough set by for a couple of months in Chiang Mai, where he proceeds to have a crazy and generally debauched time until the money runs out and he has to go home and start working again. He's done this for years now, and his enthusiasm never runs out! Ok it's not for everyone - some of us like to have a little security - but for him at least, the rush never seems to wear off :)

Will he ever have any regrets? I doubt it, and at the same time I doubt he'll ever get old enough to worry that he didn't save money for a rainy day, a pension. He has every intention of going out in the midst of having the greatest time possible :D

Interesting story, that can be adapted to individual needs...
 
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