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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

I currently live in Australia but am quite keen to move and live in Europe (not UK though). Ever since i took my first trip over there a few years ago i've fallen in love with it. There's just a vibe and feeling that i get there that i just don't get in Australia, the culture, the food, the people, i just love it and want to move there.

Now im fortunate that i've got the opportunity to go back to university next year - i'm just wondering which degrees and careers would give me the best opportunity to make the move to Europe once i've graduated (and maybe had some experience)?

I only speak English however i'd be very keen to learn a second language of my potential new home country - i'd just love to hear from any expats (or friends of expats) who have moved to Europe and what career bought them there. Engineering? Business? IT?

Are there any career paths that offer such flexibility to move to Europe?

Thanks :)
 

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I don't think it is an easy task unless you have a wife/husband or relatives already living in Europe or you have a job offer prior to moving, which would require them to prove that you can do a job that nobody else in the EU can.

The easiest way may be a student visa if you are keen on going back to uni, that would allow you to stay and study whilst you get the feel for the place and what requirements you will need to stay.
You might even find a partner which would make things easier in the long run.

You may even want to look into becoming a citizen of an EU country via ancestry if you have grandparents from the EU.

I think the long and short of it is it isn't easy if you have no ties, a student visa could be the easiest way for an extended stay.

I mean on the job front it's hard to say as most of the EU has high unemployment, depends on what you are interested in but something like teaching English could be in demand. Study for teaching certificates and the language of your chosen country might put you in good stance.
 

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The only country in the EU I know of that is actually encouraging foreigners to come there to work fresh out of school is Germany - and as I understand it, they're looking for engineers and other "hard science" majors, mostly from Spain. How long this is likely to last is anyone's guess, but learning German along with a hard science type of major has always been a reasonable investment in your future.

I've found that having a good background in accounting (if you're more interested in business) combined with a reasonable level of German (or any other language, given that you're a native English speaker) also can be attractive to large, multinational companies. Though with the accounting, it really helps to have a few years of experience "back home" before you go job hunting in Europe.

Just my two cents here.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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In Germany, at any rate, it can't be impossible because I seem to run into a lot of Americans and Canadians working here in Berlin. Myself among them.
 

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Italy has a couple possible options. One is the "working holiday" visa which is available to younger citizens of Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Another is the traditional student visa, but Italy's version permits part-time employment (up to 20 hours per week) in plausibly academically-related work.

Unfortunately residence time clocked with either of these visas does not count as residence time toward naturalization as an Italian citizen or (as I understand it) the EC Long Term Residence Permit.

Speaking of which, it's not unusual for Australians to have various European ancestries. Obviously it's a good idea to investigate any such options to see if citizenship recognition is possible. Italian and Irish descent often work, to pick a couple examples.

Also, Austria has an intriguing option. If you land a job as a university professor in Austria -- something that's probably easier if you pursue graduate studies there -- then Austrian citizenship is yours for the asking (and provided you don't already have EU/EEA or Swiss citizenship). That's a weird little quirk in Austria's citizenship law and an interesting little perk for university professors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you so much for your input everyone!

I have already looked into getting a European passport as my mums family is Slovenian however we couldn't find my grandmothers passport and a few other vital papers to prove that she was born there - so we weren't able to get citizenship.

Im sure i could teach English somewhere or get a holiday working visa but i'm looking for a way to make a permanent move so feel it would be best if i had some sort of skills that could make me more attractive to European employers.

I am already strongly considering going back to uni to do Engineering (civil) however would be open to other types of engineering if they could open doors up to Europe, if anyone has any experience here??....

Although im open to consider any other industry that might give me a good chance of getting over there - someone mentioned accounting already, anyone have any experience in any others?

The only country in the EU I know of that is actually encouraging foreigners to come there to work fresh out of school is Germany - and as I understand it, they're looking for engineers and other "hard science" majors, mostly from Spain. How long this is likely to last is anyone's guess, but learning German along with a hard science type of major has always been a reasonable investment in your future.

I've found that having a good background in accounting (if you're more interested in business) combined with a reasonable level of German (or any other language, given that you're a native English speaker) also can be attractive to large, multinational companies. Though with the accounting, it really helps to have a few years of experience "back home" before you go job hunting in Europe.
Bev, would you have any more info about what sort of engineering or hard sciences are in demand? I've sorted through a heap of online European job-sites and its hard to get a clear idea.

Thanks everyone
 

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The title of engineer is taken very, very seriously in much of Europe. In Germany, you generally include "Ing." on your business cards and definitely in your CV. Try Googling "Ingenieur deutschland" and you should come up with lots of information for Germany at least.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Fond though I am of living here, I should however say that, at the end of the day, middle-class life here isn't so very different. You get up in the morning, go to work, come home again; you earn money and you spend it. The point being, study something you enjoy with an eye to future mobility, but don't do something you dislike just for the sake of being able to do it in Europe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The title of engineer is taken very, very seriously in much of Europe. In Germany, you generally include "Ing." on your business cards and definitely in your CV. Try Googling "Ingenieur deutschland" and you should come up with lots of information for Germany at least.
Cheers,
Bev
Thanks Bev, will have a look.

Fond though I am of living here, I should however say that, at the end of the day, middle-class life here isn't so very different. You get up in the morning, go to work, come home again; you earn money and you spend it. The point being, study something you enjoy with an eye to future mobility, but don't do something you dislike just for the sake of being able to do it in Europe.
Although day to day life would be similar there's just something about Europe that i can't get enough of, the way of life and the way everything is done just appeals to me a lot more than Australia. Agree with you definitely, i'm just hoping that i can match a career path that i think i will enjoy with something that can give me those opportunities to move to Europe, so two birds with one stone :)
 

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Thanks Bev, will have a look.



Although day to day life would be similar there's just something about Europe that i can't get enough of, the way of life and the way everything is done just appeals to me a lot more than Australia. Agree with you definitely, i'm just hoping that i can match a career path that i think i will enjoy with something that can give me those opportunities to move to Europe, so two birds with one stone :)
I know you said you wanted to make a permanent move, but I would recommend doing the WHV to start with because 1) it's an amazingly easy way to get the right to live in Europe 2) it's easier to find out expectations about higher education and make contacts for jobs when you're already there 3) it'd probably be helpful to get a better sense of what that "something about Europe" really is, because there are many nice things about Europe, but just about all of them come with tradeoffs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I know you said you wanted to make a permanent move, but I would recommend doing the WHV to start with because 1) it's an amazingly easy way to get the right to live in Europe 2) it's easier to find out expectations about higher education and make contacts for jobs when you're already there 3) it'd probably be helpful to get a better sense of what that "something about Europe" really is, because there are many nice things about Europe, but just about all of them come with tradeoffs.
Good point dreamoutloud, ill have a bit of a look into it.
 

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You might want to choose a shorter way - try to get into the college in the college in the county you'd love to move to. This might improve your chances for getting a job and residency in your target country after graduation. Moreover, while studying in a new country, you'll be able to decide if you really want to stay there. Even if you decide that it was not worth it, you will have a quality European diploma and priceless intercultural experience.
 

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Thanks Bev, will have a look.



Although day to day life would be similar there's just something about Europe that i can't get enough of, the way of life and the way everything is done just appeals to me a lot more than Australia. Agree with you definitely, i'm just hoping that i can match a career path that i think i will enjoy with something that can give me those opportunities to move to Europe, so two birds with one stone :)
Engineering is a good choice provided you enjoy it and have an aptitude. But why follow something that you are not good at, and may not even enjoy simply to have an opportunity to move elsewhere?

You state that 'the way of life and the way everything is done just appeals to me'. Honestly, I find that a bit of a red flag, like someone who has met someone a few times and has a massive crush on them by filling in the blanks of their personality they haven't seen yet. The object of their affection (for you Europe) is perfect and can do no wrong. Any country/culture is going to have things that please you and things that do not. There are things in France, where I live, that I really enjoy, but other things that cause me to roll my eyes and I will never 'get' why things are the way they are here.

Another point with making 'Europe' the your crush is that it has many, many different cultures that do not necessary function as one big culture. The Swedes will have different ways of doing things/seeing things compared to the Italians, compared to the Hungarians. Where exactly have you travelled? What exactly was it that appealed to you? What is 'everything' and how exactly do they 'get things done' in a way you like. I don't think you have had to deal with French administration ;)

I would suggest looking for a career path that is global (engineer is a good one) and see if you can do an exchange in a country that interests you through university. The Working Visa is also a good option to get a taste for the country you have chosen, like dating it ;) Dating someone can be vastly different than marrying them, so being in a country on holiday can be very different from living there.

Please don't take what I am saying as being negative, I applaud you for having a goal/passion and wanting to pursue it. Take the advice given and perhaps if you provided some more details about what it is exactly you find missing in Australia that Europe can provide people will be able to give you more detailed advice.
 

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I agree.. Be careful while a final move since grass is always greener on the other side. Also make sure you make all the arrangements before moving.
 

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There should be some job requirements in Europe. If you are eligible for those jobs then you can try to apply that jobs to visit Europe again.
 
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