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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New point based system allows foreign nationals to apply for Japan PR.

Under the new system, due to come into play sometime in March, those who score 70 points will be eligible for permanent residency after three years instead of five. If you have a score of over 80 points then this drops down to as short as one year.


Below link explains all.
https://blog.gaijinpot.com/japans-new-permanent-residency-rules-explained/
 
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Thanks for posting this. While it says this point system will enable qualified foreigners to earn PR more quickly, the truth is that getting a PR in three (or fewer) years has always been possible. (I did it.)

What this point system does, at least theoretically, is make the the process far more transparent. I'd first applied for mine on the suggestion of a friendly officer in the immigration office in the town I lived at the time--didn't know I was eligible, as I was still on my first visa. (All the information available online at that time suggested I was not eligible.) While dubious, I applied...only to be rejected, with no reason given.

The officer was apologetic, and told me at the time that these decisions (made elsewhere) were often somewhat random, and that I should try again. Soon after, I got offered a job in a different prefecture, and applied again for PR there. I got it, despite basically turning in the very same paperwork (my new salary was slightly higher).

This was almost twenty years ago. In looking over the numbers, I can see that I had enough points to qualify for the one-year--which didn't exist then...but neither did the three-year PR, which I got. (Actually, I got mine in just under three years, which again was supposedly impossible back then.) Note that I was also married to a Japanese national, with dependents--something not included in this chart, but which (at least twenty years ago) used to have a great impact (so I'd been told) on how applications were received.

These published guidelines would help remove the mystery--the seeming randomness (and occasional unfairness)--of the PR process. This is a good thing, methinks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for posting this. While it says this point system will enable qualified foreigners to earn PR more quickly, the truth is that getting a PR in three (or fewer) years has always been possible. (I did it.)

What this point system does, at least theoretically, is make the the process far more transparent. I'd first applied for mine on the suggestion of a friendly officer in the immigration office in the town I lived at the time--didn't know I was eligible, as I was still on my first visa. (All the information available online at that time suggested I was not eligible.) While dubious, I applied...only to be rejected, with no reason given.

The officer was apologetic, and told me at the time that these decisions (made elsewhere) were often somewhat random, and that I should try again. Soon after, I got offered a job in a different prefecture, and applied again for PR there. I got it, despite basically turning in the very same paperwork (my new salary was slightly higher).

This was almost twenty years ago. In looking over the numbers, I can see that I had enough points to qualify for the one-year--which didn't exist then...but neither did the three-year PR, which I got. (Actually, I got mine in just under three years, which again was supposedly impossible back then.) Note that I was also married to a Japanese national, with dependents--something not included in this chart, but which (at least twenty years ago) used to have a great impact (so I'd been told) on how applications were received.

These published guidelines would help remove the mystery--the seeming randomness (and occasional unfairness)--of the PR process. This is a good thing, methinks.
Could you tell me what is the validity period of Japan PR once you receive it ?
I understand PR stands for permanent & supposed to be life time as long as you remain in Japan. My question is more towards once you get PR, is there any minimum time we need to remain in Japan to keep it activated ? Is there any renewal needed after every say 5 years ?
what if someone decides leave Japan & come back say after 5-6 years ?
 

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Could you tell me what is the validity period of Japan PR once you receive it ?
I understand PR stands for permanent & supposed to be life time as long as you remain in Japan. My question is more towards once you get PR, is there any minimum time we need to remain in Japan to keep it activated ? Is there any renewal needed after every say 5 years ?
what if someone decides leave Japan & come back say after 5-6 years ?
There used to be an English-language site explaining this, but it appears that the Immigration Bureau is no longer maintaining this site...which is sad.

PR is theoretically permanent. However, each time you leave the country, you have to either 1) return within one year, or 2) fill out and file a request with your local immigration office for what is known here as a "sainyuukoku kyokasho." Doing the latter gives you a five-year window (formerly three years) to be outside of Japan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you very much for this useful information !!! God bless


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