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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone heard about the violence happening in Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, and Leon ?
 

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Anyone heard about the violence happening in Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, and Leon ?
From Informador:
29 bloqueos de vialidades en todo el Estado
15 detenidos
7 muertos
26 rutas de transporte público suspendidas
3 intentos fallidos de bloqueos
19 municipios afectados (6 de la metrópoli y el resto del interior del Estado)
4 enfrentamientos armados
15 heridos
11 bancos y caja popular afectados
16 gasolineras afectadas
3 intentos fallidos de incendios
 

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just what I read about in the news just now, sounds like quite a bit of activity, In Guad , ZAp, some other places in Jalisco < even setting fire to a Pemex station in PV.
6 dead, 12 wounded, many missing, Cars burning as roadblocks in 23 locations, helicopter full of soldiers & feds, stopped motorcade of Cartel members.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
WOW ! Looks like the last State Dept. Advisory was right about Jalisco.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Looks like Jalisco is turning into another Tamaulipas and Guadalajara another Reynosa.
That would be really sad. I have several friends that still live in Chapala and they seem more worried now than a couple of years ago. This JNG cartel seems to have expanded over most of Mexico in about 6 months, making it a powerful cartel and seems to be constantly fighting others to extend it's hold and control. Seems they are making the point with authorities to not mess with them. :(
 

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This can be pretty amusing stuff. We have lived on Lake Chapala for 15 years and in San Cristóbal de Las Casas for eight years. When we moved to Chiapas in 2006 the place was kind of scary but now we find it kind of nice to be able to escape to Zapatistaland down around the Guatemala border to escape increasinngly dangerous Jalisco. One thing we learned about cockroaches in Alabama is the more you stomp on their sorry asses the more their cousins proliferate in your kitchen.
 

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Don't think it quite got to Leon

"The narco-blockades in Jalisco … are due to the detention of El Mencho, leader of the CJNG," tweeted Jaime Barrera, editor of the Milenio newspapers in Jalisco. A candidate for governor of Colima also relayed the unconfirmed statement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We have heard reports of 3 vehicles torched in hwys in/around Leon. Have not contacted relatives yet. Other than those burnings, nothing else, so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
From what I hear, extranjeros are not worried about "home invasions" or being targets, from the violence, but more that they will wind up in the middle of some situation of confrontation as they go places. Those that are not very active don't seem very concerned.
 

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A couple of weeks ago we were driving from San Cristóbal de Las Casas, Chiapas to Orizaba, Veracruz on our way back to Lake Chapala and on the autopista from Tuxtla Gutiérrez to Tinaja - a normally rather lonely highway - there were numerous cops and federal agents manning roadblocks here and there and, while checkpoints are not unusual in Chiapas because of the large number of Central Americans coming furtively across the Guatemala/Mexico border seeking employment opportunites in Mexico or farther north. , we were amazed at the number of cops and other officials patrolling and stopping cars along that stretch of road which is about 250 kilometers more or less through Chiapas, Tabasco and Veracruz States before one gets to Minatitlán, Veracruz. We inquired as to what was going on along the way and it seems that bandits were stopping cars along that autopista and robbing the occupants at gunpoint. The federal cops eventually nailed these creeps; killed one and arrested two others and - guess what - these incidents - which were quite serious and dangerous - never made the news either locally or nationally. Peña Nieto declared that he would reduce random, violent crime in both rural and urban áreas of Mexico and here is how he has accomplished that. These crimes are simply not reported nor even acknowledged. This is an old trick employed by George Wallace in Alabama when I was a kid in the 1950s and 1960s so it´s old news to me. His notion was that when African- American citizens marched through the streets demanding equal opportunities with European Americans - simply ignore them but he couldn´t control the big city press in Alabama so his tactic didn´t work. The free press in Mexico will also ignore Peña Nieto's desires but, tell me, how many of you media-wise people know that the autopista between Tuxtla Gutiérrez and the Veracrus border was, for a time, taken over by bandits harassing and robbing motorists at gunpoint? We only know because we happened to be driving along that route that day although we, luckily, did not encounter any of these highway theives..

Do not believe crime statistics you read about in the newspaper. We are all being manipulated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Do I need to worry about travel from Guadalajara to Queretaro or SMA? Or down into Colima?
For us, it usually depends on when and how we would want to go, and what the latest advisory said. Things change from day to day, so one never knows. Just do your thing and have your Plan B and Plan C ready, knowing how you would handle each type of problem, if one were to present itself on your travels. The more time you spend here without problems, the more careful and knowledgeable you have become. You will not hear from anyone here who has had bad experiences, because those people are long gone from here and put those experiences behind them. No one here can tell you how your trip will be tomorrow, all we can tell you is how our trip went, or how we have heard others went. Things change. You must decide for yourself. Good luck. :D
 
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From what I hear, extranjeros are not worried about "home invasions" or being targets, from the violence, but more that they will wind up in the middle of some situation of confrontation as they go places. Those that are not very active don't seem very concerned.
For many, ignorance is bliss.

All too many expats in Mexico, in my experience, are oblivious to current events in the country and don't sufficiently understand Spanish (written and/or spoken). I agree with the sentiment, though, that expats aren't typically, specifically targeted in these narco-terrorist activities(though some have been, more often along the USA/Mexico). As far as other crimes, such as home invasions, etc. ... yes, expats have been and are, from what I know, specifically targeted (but not in percentages larger than Mexican citizens/residents are targeted by criminals).

What's unsettling to expats, and Mexicans as well, in the narco-terrorist activities in major cities in Mexico is finding oneself on the scene of violence or threats when they occur. These are situations most North American expats are unfamiliar with in the communities where they lived in their 'home' country. Roads blocked with burning busses. Automatic gunfire. Etc. Nobody wants to be victimized, or face the fear/threat of being victimized ... as an 'innocent bystander.'
 

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From what I hear, extranjeros are not worried about "home invasions" or being targets, from the violence, but more that they will wind up in the middle of some situation of confrontation as they go places. Those that are not very active don't seem very concerned.
Explanation(?):

Similarly, the narco attacks continued early Saturday in Leon, where men used gasoline to set fire to Municipal Transit Police patrol vehicle and a gift shop. Yesterday, when questioned by these facts, the Ministerial Authorities declined to comment. That night, the local government issued a statement to clarify that there was a prisoner designated as responsible for the fires.
Source: Borderland Beat
 

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For many, ignorance is bliss.

All too many expats in Mexico, in my experience, are oblivious to current events in the country and don't sufficiently understand Spanish (written and/or spoken). I agree with the sentiment, though, that expats aren't typically, specifically targeted in these narco-terrorist activities(though some have been, more often along the USA/Mexico). As far as other crimes, such as home invasions, etc. ... yes, expats have been and are, from what I know, specifically targeted (but not in percentages larger than Mexican citizens/residents are targeted by criminals).

What's unsettling to expats, and Mexicans as well, in the narco-terrorist activities in major cities in Mexico is finding oneself on the scene of violence or threats when they occur. These are situations most North American expats are unfamiliar with in the communities where they lived in their 'home' country. Roads blocked with burning busses. Automatic gunfire. Etc. Nobody wants to be victimized, or face the fear/threat of being victimized ... as an 'innocent bystander.'
Well said, Longford I´m not trying to suck up to you but you are actually beginnning to show some intelligence.

I re-state my earlier point. There we were driving back to Lake Chapala from San Cristóbal and we got off to a late start. The autopista from Tuxtla Gutiérrez to Tinaja was lined with cops and, as it turned out, bandits were stopping cars on that normally lonely highway, boxing them in and robbing the passengers. Had we not left home late, there is a good chance that we, especially with Jalisco license plates, would have been singled out as victims of the highwaymen.

A couple of months before that we were driving back from the Guerrero Coast to Lake Chapala and before we entered the autopista to head north to Chapala, narco gangs had murdered an official at the toll plaza for cars entering the autopista,

Now things are going to hell in Jalisco with all sorts of banditry and killings along the roadway and in certain establishments. I think it´s time to hunker down behind tall walls and live on BLT sammiches.

I grew up in some very violent places in the United States and lived in a number of violent places overseas but this ambushing and killing of numerous cops on patrol is a new experience for me. Watch your backs, folks.
 
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