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I don't know if you can help but I brought my VW Sharan over with really nice alloys on it and obviously the wheels failed on the itv as it wasn't what was stated on the log book. VW have stated that the wheels on it are an upgrade on the original ones so actually function better however, this makes no difference to the itv.

I was told that an Escritura can add the change to the log book indicating the new wheel sizes in order for it to pass it's itv. Has anyone ever come across this and if so does anyone know where to take it to get it done and the approximate cost?

I am based in La Cala De Mijas.

Cheers :)(y)
 

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If the rolling radius is within +/- 3% of the originals and the width does not exceed the originals you can ask the ITV station to add the new tyre sizes to your logbook. In fact, if they met the "equivalente" criteria they should have passed it anyway. You casn check "equivalencia" in online calculators like this one:


Assuming therefore that they are not "equivalent" you need to look for a certified engineer who will homologate your wheels and tyres. Look for "homologaciones vehículos" in your area, there will be many companies who will do this for you, ranging from agents who will do the whole engineer, fees, installation certificate and paperwork, for one price (including their fees on top of course), to the individuals who you can approach on your own and do it step by step.

The process is usually:

1: A certified engineer writes a "proyecto", a design spec which states that the wheels are fit for the vehicle and won't interfere with any of the original design elements.
2: A certified mechanic certifies that he/she has installed the wheels acording to the engineer's "proyecto".
3: The ITV station reviews the documents and checks that the wheels are in fact those shown in the "proyecto" and are installed and notes the modification on the log book.

Get a quote from a one stop shop and see if it is worth your while keeping the "nice" wheels or going back to standard.
 

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A couple of people have mentioned that they had problems with the ITV for used cars they have imported into Spain.

I believe that for some time, for the purposes of registering an imported used car, a roadworthiness test - ITV, CT, HU, etc. pass certificate in any EU/EEC country is valid for a certain period in any other EU country.

However, this does not mean that an imported car will pass subsequent tests in the new country, as cars produced for sale there might not correspond with those produced for the original country, especially older ones.

For example, I imported a Spanish reg Alfa into France, but had to fit rear seat belts to pass the French CT, as they became compulsory in France some years before Spain. On a subsequent CT it was failed because its wheels were a different diameter from those homologated in France, although both had similar rolling radii, and were listed as alternatives in the car's paperwork. The alternative size was noted (with a chop) on the "Reformas autorizadas" section of the Ficha Tecnica, but not transferred onto the CG, which doesn't show tyre details in any case.

I also have an originally Swiss registered Audi, but that model was not imported into France until two years after mine was produced, so that a few items differ from the details held by the CT stations, but must have been considered when it was re-registered. This has been discussed a couple of times, but there is now no problem as long as I use the same test station.
 

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If the rolling radius is within +/- 3% of the originals and the width does not exceed the originals you can ask the ITV station to add the new tyre sizes to your logbook. In fact, if they met the "equivalente" criteria they should have passed it anyway. You casn check "equivalencia" in online calculators like this one:


Assuming therefore that they are not "equivalent" you need to look for a certified engineer who will homologate your wheels and tyres. Look for "homologaciones vehículos" in your area, there will be many companies who will do this for you, ranging from agents who will do the whole engineer, fees, installation certificate and paperwork, for one price (including their fees on top of course), to the individuals who you can approach on your own and do it step by step.

The process is usually:

1: A certified engineer writes a "proyecto", a design spec which states that the wheels are fit for the vehicle and won't interfere with any of the original design elements.
2: A certified mechanic certifies that he/she has installed the wheels acording to the engineer's "proyecto".
3: The ITV station reviews the documents and checks that the wheels are in fact those shown in the "proyecto" and are installed and notes the modification on the log book.

Get a quote from a one stop shop and see if it is worth your while keeping the "nice" wheels or going back to standard.
That's fantastic! Thanks so much for taking the time to give me such a detailed response! Huge thanks for your help! (y) (y) (y) (y) (y) (y) (y) (y)
 

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Now let's hope your local ITV station accept it!

From the controlling EU Directive 92/23/EEC dated 31 March 1992 in the tire fitting requirements and definitions:

All tires mounted on the same axle must be of the same type.
"Type meaning a category of tires that does not differ in the following key aspects: the manufacturer’s name or trade mark, size designation, category of use: road/special/ snow/temporary use, structure (bias-ply, cross-ply, radial-ply), speed category, load-capacity index, cross-section.

This is not the same as identical and makes no mention of tread patterns.

For the poster with the mismatched tyres on a BMW, if the requirement for similar speed category and load-capacity index will catch you out - if noticed!

In France, and pre Brexit at least, a less than 6 month old UK MOT was acceptable when first registering an imported car, Spain never recognised it though nor a French CT.

Some years back there were moves afoot which meant that any already registered in an EU member state would be transferrable to another without further technical checks but AFAIK it came to nought.
 
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