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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am planning to move to NSW early next year. Im starting this thread to get feedback from other who are still looking for a Job in this field.

Also get tips and advice from people who already made it to thier first job.

I have experience in Support, implementation and project Management for 10+ years. How hard is it going to be?
 

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Subscribing as I plan to move to Sydney next year.
 

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Support, Implementation and PM are quite distinct. What's your elevator pitch - how would you describe yourself professionally in 1-2 sentences?

Some notes:
- The job hunt depends on the position you are going for. A PM has a different course of action compared to a DEV, for example.
- Study the job market where you intend to apply. Read carefully all the job descriptions you can find (seek, linked in, etc.) That will tell you some elements that you need to touch upon and demonstrate experience with.
- It's a good idea to brush up on your skills. Whatever your main qualification is, go through the theory again.
- Prepare! Prepare your profile / CV and more importantly, prepare how you intend to present yourself. Know your narrative, your experience - anticipate questions and how you would respond.
Work on your accent if you need to.
- Scout recruiters in your field. One way to do it is to catalogue job advertisements, because a lot of them are through recruiting companies. Note what companies list the jobs you would apply for. When you get to Australia you'll likely be dealing with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Support, Implementation and PM are quite distinct. What's your elevator pitch - how would you describe yourself professionally in 1-2 sentences?

Some notes:
- The job hunt depends on the position you are going for. A PM has a different course of action compared to a DEV, for example.
- Study the job market where you intend to apply. Read carefully all the job descriptions you can find (seek, linked in, etc.) That will tell you some elements that you need to touch upon and demonstrate experience with.
- It's a good idea to brush up on your skills. Whatever your main qualification is, go through the theory again.
- Prepare! Prepare your profile / CV and more importantly, prepare how you intend to present yourself. Know your narrative, your experience - anticipate questions and how you would respond.
Work on your accent if you need to.
- Scout recruiters in your field. One way to do it is to catalogue job advertisements, because a lot of them are through recruiting companies. Note what companies list the jobs you would apply for. When you get to Australia you'll likely be dealing with them.
Thanks for the detailed explanation and it really helps.

I would say my experience is in 'Software Implementation and Project Management. Now this goes from 3rd party software solutions, to in-house developed application being deployed at Client premises.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My understanding is that a one month review of existing Jobs and Opportunities is an added benifit before actually moving.

However I believe project management positions are mainly for the Australians, due to client interest and local experience.

Please share some light in this area.
 

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Seniors

Below are my details.

1. Appreciate if you can confirm my prospects to recieve invite from NSW or VIC.

2. Working as Director IT Projects for Cognizant in the US (past 5+ years) - Does US experience has any weightage to get State invite/nomination?

Appreciate your help & assistance in advance.

Details:
Occupation: ICT Project Manager (135112)
EOI (NSW) Filed: 14-Feb-2018
EOI (VIC) Filed: 16-Feb-2018
Invite (NSW): Awaited
Invite (VIC) Awaited

Age: 15
Language: 10
Education: 15
Experience: 10
SS: 5
PSA: 5
Total Points: 55+5
 

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I would say my experience is in 'Software Implementation and Project Management. Now this goes from 3rd party software solutions, to in-house developed application being deployed at Client premises.
I understand what you're saying, but it's a bit vague for a lot of recruiters to digest. Avoid "X and Y" constructs because it leads to confusion. Instead of "I'm a mechanic and bus driver" try "I'm a senior mechanic with experience driving buses" - in the latter example "mechanic" stands out. "Software Implementation" is not a job. Study the market (i.e. look at specific ads) and find some that match your experience. What do they call those jobs? Call yourself that. The more X and Y and Z you add the more likely your CV is to end up in a bin. Help recruiters sell you. You're the product. Be clear about what you bring to the table. (I've learned this the hard way...)

However I believe project management positions are mainly for the Australians, due to client interest and local experience.
People may be turned down for a job and then come to say/believe that it's because they're foreign. Unless explicitly told, you can't know that. It's far more convenient to blame something other than yourself for failing to get a job. Maybe there was a better candidate.

Local experience is important for ANY job in Australia (a good friend from the US has a hard time getting a writing job, even though his portfolio is impressive, it's not Australian experience.) This has nothing to do with PM jobs per se. I am not Australian (yet) and I've been working as PM for several years in Australia (in fact, I'm a PMO lead now). At least half of PMs I've worked with are not Australians. Personally, especially in Melbourne, I don't think the distinction is based on where you're from. I will say this - as a PM you spend most of your time communicating. Not communicating effectively and eloquently is a big negative, which is an indirect effect of being a foreigner. In other words, if you don't speak English very well - either you have a heavy accent, use improper grammar, use a different English dialect such as Indian or simply fail to make yourself clearly understood - then your chances of landing a PM job decrease. Nobody will tell you that it's because of your accent, but if you have a heavy accent... that probably played a part in it. It has nothing to do with being foreign; it's just a matter of job requirements and what you can offer.

I'm surprised how many people here spend zero time brushing their English skills and working on their accent. You cannot underestimate the importance of presenting yourself well.
 
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