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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just would like to share so though about being in a foreign country.

My friend went on holiday to Italy last week and happen to break her leg. Although she doesn't speak italian she was rushed to the emergency but she couldn't get across that she could not take any medication since she had an allergy. In the end she refused to get treated and they couldn't do anything to stop her pain and she had to organise an emergency transfer back to France.

Do you feel confident enough to deal with the "pompiers" in case of emergency in France. I think I came across a website that seem to solve this problem Accueil - Medi.Info Plus, votre santé - votre langue - votre choix

What are your thought about that?
 

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I really have my doubts about such a service for expats. First of all, they say that only registered medical personnel have access to your history - and just how many doctors, nurses or other emergency personnel in France do you think are signed up with the service? (For that matter, how many emergency personnel have immediate access to the Internet?) Second of all, how are they doing the translations into whatever languages are necessary? Automated translations? A staff of translators? And then there's the matter of how do you tell the folks treating you in an emergency which private medical records service you're enrolled in?

I think it's a good idea, perhaps a step in the right direction - but this sort of universal medical records program needs to be instituted on a national or regional basis with one single standard.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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I just would like to share so though about being in a foreign country.

My friend went on holiday to Italy last week and happen to break her leg. Although she doesn't speak italian she was rushed to the emergency but she couldn't get across that she could not take any medication since she had an allergy. In the end she refused to get treated and they couldn't do anything to stop her pain and she had to organise an emergency transfer back to France.

Do you feel confident enough to deal with the "pompiers" in case of emergency in France. I think I came across a website that seem to solve this problem Accueil - Medi.Info Plus, votre santé - votre langue - votre choix

What are your thought about that?
In all honesty the situation would have been the same anywhere (even in your native land) if you were unconcious. The answer has to be emergency medical cards, wrist bands or whatever that as a minimum carry alerts about allergies, drug reactions etc and it has to be universal in terms of language.

Don't ask me how to go about implementing such a thing but a start might be a simple white wrist band with a red cross on it alerting emergency services to possible issues. Carrying a more extensive document close to your ID (passport, driving license, CDS) could supplement it.

It's a very thought provoking issue though

Cheers
 
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I agree with David: if you have a known medical problem (eg allergies, Rh-, or diabetes etc) it's up to you to ensure it gets communicated to the people who might have to treat you potentially in an unconscious state.

I think in the UK they did start something like the wristbands David suggests, but, of course, only in English, and take-up was relatively low.

Should we start a campaign to set up a range of internationally understood symbols to alert health and emergency professionals (like road signs) - a bit like all service personnel have their blood group on them - that can be contained in a wristband or locket or something? (she says tongue in cheek since it's far too sensible an idea to imagine it could ever be organised - cf electrical/phone sockets)

In the short term, get your major issues translated to the language of your destination country and carry them visibly on your person, perhaps.

H
 

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Is it as simple

Well Bev, your input is always challenging. I also came accross with some questions and took upon myself to ask them directly.
I really have my doubts about such a service for expats. First of all, they say that only registered medical personnel have access to your history - and just how many doctors, nurses or other emergency personnel in France do you think are signed up with the service? (For that matter, how many emergency personnel have immediate access to the Internet?) Second of all, how are they doing the translations into whatever languages are necessary? Automated translations? A staff of translators? And then there's the matter of how do you tell the folks treating you in an emergency which private medical records service you're enrolled in?
And I got my answers. They are a new company and they are in process of getting hospital and emergency personnel on board as they are only started and getting people to change there mentalities is hard work. I have relative that work in hospital and emergency services in france and I know that they are all connected to the internet and so are the UK hospital as my husband dicovered when our son had to be taken into emergency for a displace elbow.

Also they've explained and sent me some pdf document of what the form look like and it's in fact a simple process. It's not google translated, all the forms are professionnaly translated by real people and you actualy have a lot of drop down list to choose from so it can translate. Bear in mind it's a basic information and not your all medical history with all your medical note. They also issue you with a card with your number on it.

I think it's a good idea, perhaps a step in the right direction - but this sort of universal medical records program needs to be instituted on a national or regional basis with one single standard.
It is a good idea and I actually think that people are relying to much on other to take care of their life. On the plane coming back from the UK my husband asked some people if they had to deal with the pompier in France and if not how will they do it. A lot of them just said that surely the pompier will be speaking a bit of english and they will get by (cause those people barely speak french).

For our son in Derby, my husband had to fill the same medical form as they were moving our son from floor to floor and although they said they deal with translator, you have to wait for the translator to turn up and what to you do if he's already busy and he takes 2 hours to get on the ward!

I often wonder what will happen in case of emergency if something happen to me and my husband has to answer question about if I have any allergies, my blood type, etc...

I think if we've got to wait for country our region to come up with there own system we will still be waiting in 10 years. France is only coming up with the Dossier Medical Personnalise but it's been in project since 2007, almost 5 years and they've just started to advertise about it but it also has it limitation.
I also came accross an other website that's a good idea but work only in France Accueil - Votre vie n'attend pas

Well it seem that people have not really taken time to think about what's involve in an emergency situation or even just when you've got to go and see your GP.


Thanks for your reply and your ideas anyway.

Cheers,
Pauline
 

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I agree with David: if you have a known medical problem (eg allergies, Rh-, or diabetes etc) it's up to you to ensure it gets communicated to the people who might have to treat you potentially in an unconscious state.

I think in the UK they did start something like the wristbands David suggests, but, of course, only in English, and take-up was relatively low.

Should we start a campaign to set up a range of internationally understood symbols to alert health and emergency professionals (like road signs) - a bit like all service personnel have their blood group on them - that can be contained in a wristband or locket or something? (she says tongue in cheek since it's far too sensible an idea to imagine it could ever be organised - cf electrical/phone sockets)

In the short term, get your major issues translated to the language of your destination country and carry them visibly on your person, perhaps.

H
Cards already exist for food allergies for example Select Wisely Food Allergy Cards | Inhabitots
It's already a start!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Spot on

In all honesty the situation would have been the same anywhere (even in your native land) if you were unconcious. The answer has to be emergency medical cards, wrist bands or whatever that as a minimum carry alerts about allergies, drug reactions etc and it has to be universal in terms of language.

Don't ask me how to go about implementing such a thing but a start might be a simple white wrist band with a red cross on it alerting emergency services to possible issues. Carrying a more extensive document close to your ID (passport, driving license, CDS) could supplement it.

It's a very thought provoking issue though

Cheers
Well you're close to the idea of this website. It is a medical card with your information that can be read in 8 languages. Their idea is to provide you with mini medical card tag so it alert emergency people that you have the card.
I think to implement such a thing is to take it upon ourselves and start spreading ideas. Wristband and medical tag are not really popular in France and you're quite limited to what information to display.
But as we say in French Rome wasn't build in one day.

Cheers,

Pauline
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's a good idea

I agree with David: if you have a known medical problem (eg allergies, Rh-, or diabetes etc) it's up to you to ensure it gets communicated to the people who might have to treat you potentially in an unconscious state.

I think in the UK they did start something like the wristbands David suggests, but, of course, only in English, and take-up was relatively low.

Should we start a campaign to set up a range of internationally understood symbols to alert health and emergency professionals (like road signs) - a bit like all service personnel have their blood group on them - that can be contained in a wristband or locket or something? (she says tongue in cheek since it's far too sensible an idea to imagine it could ever be organised - cf electrical/phone sockets)

In the short term, get your major issues translated to the language of your destination country and carry them visibly on your person, perhaps.

H
The idea of an international code is a good idea but if you think that the medical field has only recently put in place the labeling of drugs with the name of the molecule rather than with a commercial name brand, medical "road sign" will be extremely long to implement and more than the condition it's the medication that's important in case of emergency because of the interaction. The problem is that medication often change or is added and you will have to change your wristband very often.

You say: In the short term, get your major issues translated to the language of your destination country and carry them visibly on your person, perhaps.
In fact that's what they propose cause you can print your form in different language and it will be a fraction of the price of a translation company espacialy if your medication or some of your information.

But I also think it's not just about medical condition. Have you ever watch the "emergency bikers" (I'm not sure if it's on ITV or Channel 4). I was amazed to find out that in the UK, it take between 10 minutes to up to 3 hours to contact any relative! I suppose in France it's a bit different as you're suppose to carry your ID at all time (although mine is not up to date and my address is wrong now!).
If one of my kids got involve into an accident, I would like to know as soon as possible!

Well more food for thought.

Thanks for your input anyway.

Cheers,

Pauline
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's good

Cards already exist for food allergies for example Select Wisely Food Allergy Cards | Inhabitots
It's already a start!
And I think in France it's not widely spread enough. But something it's just the fact that you barely know what medical problem people around you have got and we're also not train to act in case of emergency. That should be compulsory to do first aid training.

Thanks for you input.
Cheers,
Pauline
 
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