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Retiring in two years and planning retirement in France. To get a long-term visa, would the following likely be sufficient supplemental documentation? (1) proof of my government pension (which is more than plenty for one person to live on comfortably in the US); (2) proof that i have entered into a long-term rental property contract in France; and (3) proof that I have purchased international health insurance and travel insurance. Many thanks.
 

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As far as things used to go, that should be adequate proof - though when it comes to visas (or any sort of government related process), the officials can always ask for further documents if they have any questions or doubts.

It normally isn't necessary to show a long-term rental contract. What they seem to be interested in is that you have a place to stay for at least the first month or two where you can be reached by postal mail.

But at the moment, they aren't processing any visa applications. I suspect that it may depend a bit on how and when the various travel restrictions are lifted as to whether or not there will be any changes in the process or in the documentation that is requested when you make your application. Stay tuned.
 

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...(1) proof of my government pension (which is more than plenty for one person to live on comfortably in the US); ...(3) proof that I have purchased international health insurance and travel insurance. ...
As Bev noted, who knows what the situation will be later this year, let alone in 2 years. But, if things stay more-or-less the same, I have 2 comments...

The nominal amount you need to demonstrate for income is generally set at the SMIC. That is something like a minimum wage and is currently set at 1 521€ a month.

You only need medical coverage for France, including repatriation. Travel insurance is not necessary. After being her 3 months you will be able to apply to join the French healthcare system and that process can take 3 to 5 months, maybe longer. So, if you can find a month-to-month insurance plan, or one that can be cancelled after some initial period, that may be to your financial benefit.

However, as noted, while I hope things will remain the same, things could change at any point. So, check in from time to time, especially as you get close to your retirement and travel dates.
 

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To get a long-term visa, would the following likely be sufficient supplemental documentation? (1) proof of my government pension (which is more than plenty for one person to live on comfortably in the US); (2) proof that i have entered into a long-term rental property contract in France; and (3) proof that I have purchased international health insurance and travel insurance.
That's the documentation we provided 4 years ago to successfully get our long-stay visitor's visas through the French consulate in Miami. As noted by Bev and Berkinet above, however, procedures can/do change. For health insurance during our first year here we used World Nomads, that is by default travel insurance with repatriation, but others on the forum seem to have found cheaper insurance alternatives that, as Berkinet said, could cover your health needs in this country until you qualify for the French healthcare system.
 

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...we used World Nomads, that is by default travel insurance with repatriation, ...
That is a very good point. You do not necessarily need general expat insurance coverage. A travel policy that covers repatriation is sufficient. The downside of travel insurance policies is that they generally are not, per se, renewable. Though you sometimes can buy a second policy when the first one expires. Also, travel insurance will usually be less expensive than regular health insurance.
 

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The French government website application for the long stay visas is specific for what is required. When we applied last Aug 2019 we needed to show our US SS pension statement, 3 months of bank statements and health insurance for the entire length of our visa, which was for one year. There's been alot of discussion on the forum about which companies provide that. There have been reports of applications being sent back because the applicant did not have the right kind or right amount of time for the insurance.

We arrived in October 2019 and in Feb 2020 applied for the CPAM French health system. We got our temporary SS numbers and acceptance into the system about 2 weeks ago-so that took about 2 months. And we just signed up for the supplemental Mutuelle. We are in process to cancel our international plan with Insubuy that we used for the visa app.

And as many have already said-by the time the French government starts to process visas again, what is required could very well change.

Good luck!
 

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If you come over with an AirBnB booked for a month or two (assuming that they're still in business), the proper health insurance (if you're American I suggest the health insurance offered by the Association of Americans Resident Overseas - www.aaro.org - as it fulfills all of the French requirements) and documentation of a sufficient income, you should be fine.

As said earlier you'll be eligible to join the French health care/insurance system after three months but there's always a delay between application and being able to join. We wound up needing the AARO insurance for about seven months.

Do you have a parent or grandparent from Ireland, Italy or Poland?
 

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If you come over with an AirBnB booked for a month or two (assuming that they're still in business),
You will need a place long enough to get your paperwork sent back to you here in France so you would not want to think about a very short term location. You would then also need to be able to check the mailbox so make sure it will be OK with the owner. Ours had to have a box installed when we arrived.

Bill
Carcassonne
 

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And make sure your name is on the mailbox! Our first set of OFII letters with the dates for the medial exams were returned because our names were not on it.
 

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You moved from Florida? If so, was your Florida driver's license acceptable in France, or did you have to get a French driver's license?
 

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A couple of additional thoughts...

Getting that first long-stay visa is relatively easy. I think everyone has nailed the things you need to think about.

My advice is to start thinking ahead to your follow-on visa renewal, and -- in my own experience -- there are two things in particular you'll want to start working on the day after you get over your jet lag: a bank account and proof of residence.

Getting a bank account has been discussed at length elsewhere in the forum. They can be difficult or not, depending on where you live (make sure you get it with a French address). In our case, we buy renter's insurance through our bank, so that's a piece of our proof-of-residence thing. We also transfer money into it via TransferWise with a note on each deposit (in French): "Sécurité sociale de Richard Jones", or "Retraite militaire de Richard Jones". This shows we are bringing our money to France and spending it here.

For proof of residence an EDF electricity contract and monthly bills are normally accepted. Here in Paris they do not issue monthly account statements; rather, the provide a letter saying you've had a contract since XXXXXXX. But again with the bank account: this will show the monthly payment. Showing proof of residence is important for your Carte Vitale and drivers license. So I would suggest getting an EDF account in your name & at your long-term address as soon as you can after arrival.

Good luck!
 

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Let me just add here that if you receive US SS benefits, you can arrange through the Federal Benefits Unit at the US Embassy in Paris to have your benefits direct deposited in your French bank account (which saves the transfer and exchange fees).
 

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You moved from Florida? If so, was your Florida driver's license acceptable in France, or did you have to get a French driver's license?
Yes, we moved from Florida and had anticipated exchanging our driver's license from there for a French one because of the agreement between Florida and France. Unfortunately our Préfecture said that we would need to provide a driving record from the FIRST driver's license we ever had--that was 50 years ago in a different state and impossible to obtain since that state keeps records for only 11 years, so we abandoned the idea.
We believe the Préfecture only really needed a current driving record from Florida, but that's not what they asked for (despite our questioning their statement) and since we had moved to a city in France where we didn't need a car anyway, it wasn't worth pursuing.
 

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You moved from Florida? If so, was your Florida driver's license acceptable in France, or did you have to get a French driver's license?
Just re-read your question and you can use your US driving license for the first year you are living in France. If you have a license from a state with exchange privileges with France, you have only that first year in which to do the exchange. If you don't have a license from an "exchange state" then you have to go through the whole theory and driving test routine.
 
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