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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
Sorry if this is in the wrong forum but I wasn't sure where it would fit.

In light of possible changes to the status of EU nationals in the UK, is it worth my French partner moving here? We are very close to realising this plan, but are no longer sure if this should become a permanent home for us. We were considering, due to my diabolical French skills, either settling together here in England or moving to Ireland. We had these ideas before the referendum actually happened and everything got cast into doubt from there.

If I'm not mistaken, moving to Ireland would be a fair option since the UK/Ireland movement agreement exists and the fact it is in the EU would give a safety net to my French partner. If this is incorrect, please let me know. We both really like Ireland, but understand this will delay our plans considerably.

We don't want to settle down only to be uprooted again. :(
 

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If you are British, I do not see there being any real fear of your partner having to leave once we have finally left the EU. There will be visas your partner could potentially apply for, in that event.

Ireland is a safer bet, that's true.

All the best with your decision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you are British, I do not see there being any real fear of your partner having to leave once we have finally left the EU. There will be visas your partner could potentially apply for, in that event.

Ireland is a safer bet, that's true.

All the best with your decision.
Thanks for your reply.

I am a British citizen, yes. I'm under the impression the only visas for couples are spousal visas, though I could be incorrect. We aren't married so I'm not sure what legal foothold we have as a couple.

We could just chance it and see what happens, but if he isn't allowed to stay further then it would be a big problem for both of us. :( very conflicted.
 

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Thanks for your reply.

I am a British citizen, yes. I'm under the impression the only visas for couples are spousal visas, though I could be incorrect. We aren't married so I'm not sure what legal foothold we have as a couple.

We could just chance it and see what happens, but if he isn't allowed to stay further then it would be a big problem for both of us. :( very conflicted.
The main problem with Ireland is getting jobs.

On the other hand, the British job market is better than the one in Ireland.

Your French partner can still exercise EEA freedom of movement rights before March 2019.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your reply.

I am a British citizen, yes. I'm under the impression the only visas for couples are spousal visas, though I could be incorrect. We aren't married so I'm not sure what legal foothold we have as a couple.

We could just chance it and see what happens, but if he isn't allowed to stay further then it would be a big problem for both of us.
very conflicted.
The main problem with Ireland is getting jobs.

On the other hand, the British job market is better than the one in Ireland.

Your French partner can still exercise EEA freedom of movement rights before March 2019.
Hi, thanks for your reply.

I think it's the grey area after the 2019 leaving date that is making us think twice. Our issue is that, if we get settled in England with jobs and a home, we could possibly face the worst case scenario and him having to leave. This means we might have to go to our Ireland plan anyway, but we'd have wasted time and money for no reason. So we're not sure whether to cut out the middleman and go straight there instead. I'm not sure how likely it is that he'd have to leave, but I don't like having that as an option at all. It's very frustrating when we've been trying to settle for so long and after making good progress, we are knocked back again.

As your comment pointed out to me, I'm oblivious to how hard it might be to get a job in Ireland which could be an issue in itself, but still unsure what the best option is. I don't know whether we should stick it out in England until at least late 2018 to see what his status will be, and then move if necessary or to just go now.

It seems there's conflicting information about Brexit every other day, which doesn't help of course.

But again, thanks for your reply.
 

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Hi, thanks for your reply.

I think it's the grey area after the 2019 leaving date that is making us think twice. Our issue is that, if we get settled in England with jobs and a home, we could possibly face the worst case scenario and him having to leave. This means we might have to go to our Ireland plan anyway, but we'd have wasted time and money for no reason. So we're not sure whether to cut out the middleman and go straight there instead. I'm not sure how likely it is that he'd have to leave, but I don't like having that as an option at all. It's very frustrating when we've been trying to settle for so long and after making good progress, we are knocked back again.

As your comment pointed out to me, I'm oblivious to how hard it might be to get a job in Ireland which could be an issue in itself, but still unsure what the best option is. I don't know whether we should stick it out in England until at least late 2018 to see what his status will be, and then move if necessary or to just go now.

It seems there's conflicting information about Brexit every other day, which doesn't help of course.

But again, thanks for your reply.
All I would say is 'get on with it'. I can understand that you are worried about the possibility of being uprooted due to the ending of EEA freedom of movement in the UK post Brexit. Even in a worse case scenario, you are required to get an UK spouse visa for your partner. That in itself is not too difficult as many people in this forum managed to get one for their non EEA spouse. What you will need to get use to is that the 'special treatment' with EEA nationals in terms of immigration is likely to end after Brexit.
 

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Hi, thanks for your reply.

I think it's the grey area after the 2019 leaving date that is making us think twice. Our issue is that, if we get settled in England with jobs and a home, we could possibly face the worst case scenario and him having to leave. This means we might have to go to our Ireland plan anyway, but we'd have wasted time and money for no reason. So we're not sure whether to cut out the middleman and go straight there instead. I'm not sure how likely it is that he'd have to leave, but I don't like having that as an option at all. It's very frustrating when we've been trying to settle for so long and after making good progress, we are knocked back again.

As your comment pointed out to me, I'm oblivious to how hard it might be to get a job in Ireland which could be an issue in itself, but still unsure what the best option is. I don't know whether we should stick it out in England until at least late 2018 to see what his status will be, and then move if necessary or to just go now.

It seems there's conflicting information about Brexit every other day, which doesn't help of course.

But again, thanks for your reply.
You need to take into account the skills you both have and where they can be best used and give a lifestyle you wish. As stated Ireland, unless in Dublin, offers less opportunities than the UK. IMO it is unlikely anyone of good skills has anything to fear after 2019 if already settled in the UK
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi, thanks for your reply.

I think it's the grey area after the 2019 leaving date that is making us think twice. Our issue is that, if we get settled in England with jobs and a home, we could possibly face the worst case scenario and him having to leave. This means we might have to go to our Ireland plan anyway, but we'd have wasted time and money for no reason. So we're not sure whether to cut out the middleman and go straight there instead. I'm not sure how likely it is that he'd have to leave, but I don't like having that as an option at all. It's very frustrating when we've been trying to settle for so long and after making good progress, we are knocked back again.

As your comment pointed out to me, I'm oblivious to how hard it might be to get a job in Ireland which could be an issue in itself, but still unsure what the best option is. I don't know whether we should stick it out in England until at least late 2018 to see what his status will be, and then move if necessary or to just go now.

It seems there's conflicting information about Brexit every other day, which doesn't help of course.

But again, thanks for your reply.
All I would say is 'get on with it'. I can understand that you are worried about the possibility of being uprooted due to the ending of EEA freedom of movement in the UK post Brexit. Even in a worse case scenario, you are required to get an UK spouse visa for your partner. That in itself is not too difficult as many people in this forum managed to get one for their non EEA spouse. What you will need to get use to is that the 'special treatment' with EEA nationals in terms of immigration is likely to end after Brexit.
It's just been a bit of a nightmare to wrap my head around it all. We'll stick to the original plan if we can and do what's necessary. We aren't married though as we are both quite young, so I think that negates any visas for us right now.

Guess we will wing it for a while and see what happens and until there's solid info that we can work with. I am very nervous though.


Thank you. :)
 

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It's just been a bit of a nightmare to wrap my head around it all. We'll stick to the original plan if we can and do what's necessary. We aren't married though as we are both quite young, so I think that negates any visas for us right now.

Guess we will wing it for a while and see what happens and until there's solid info that we can work with. I am very nervous though.


Thank you. :)
BE POSITIVE. It will be OK
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi, thanks for your reply.

I think it's the grey area after the 2019 leaving date that is making us think twice. Our issue is that, if we get settled in England with jobs and a home, we could possibly face the worst case scenario and him having to leave. This means we might have to go to our Ireland plan anyway, but we'd have wasted time and money for no reason. So we're not sure whether to cut out the middleman and go straight there instead. I'm not sure how likely it is that he'd have to leave, but I don't like having that as an option at all. It's very frustrating when we've been trying to settle for so long and after making good progress, we are knocked back again.

As your comment pointed out to me, I'm oblivious to how hard it might be to get a job in Ireland which could be an issue in itself, but still unsure what the best option is. I don't know whether we should stick it out in England until at least late 2018 to see what his status will be, and then move if necessary or to just go now.

It seems there's conflicting information about Brexit every other day, which doesn't help of course.

But again, thanks for your reply.
You need to take into account the skills you both have and where they can be best used and give a lifestyle you wish. As stated Ireland, unless in Dublin, offers less opportunities than the UK. IMO it is unlikely anyone of good skills has anything to fear after 2019 if already settled in the UK
He does have a good skillset so maybe he won't get told to leave. Just hoping for a good solution to it all. Based on the fact that multiple people have now mentioned Ireland having a smaller job market, it probably is prudent to wait it out here first.

Fingers crossed.

Thank you.
 

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If you aren't married and don't expect to be by 2019, remember there is an unmarried partner visa route too.

For the unmarried partner route- in order to qualify, you simply have to prove you have been living together in the same home, in a relationship akin to marriage for 2 years. If you are living together at the moment and can prove it with official documents like a tenancy agreement, bank statements etc, you can apply for the unmarried partner visa in 2019.

Again, all this only applies on the assumption that post March 2019, settled EU citizens are expected to go through same visa processes as the rest of the world. I would take the advise of the above posters- make the move.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you aren't married and don't expect to be by 2019, remember there is an unmarried partner visa route too.

For the unmarried partner route- in order to qualify, you simply have to prove you have been living together in the same home, in a relationship akin to marriage for 2 years. If you are living together at the moment and can prove it with official documents like a tenancy agreement, bank statements etc, you can apply for the unmarried partner visa in 2019.

Again, all this only applies on the assumption that post March 2019, settled EU citizens are expected to go through same visa processes as the rest of the world. I would take the advise of the above posters- make the move.
Oh, thanks! I have no idea how I didn't think about that visa. As it's unlikely we'll be married by that point, I think this is the route we'll look at. We won't be living together until about two months time, due to job reasons, which will put us about half a year over the threshold of Brexit. If we can count on those six months being ok for his status, we migh just be alright. If not, I think we'll be packing our bags and leaving the UK as it's too risky to settle without hindrance.

Hoping all will be alright.

Thank you very much
 

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Actually no, if you aren't already living together now, and if you are going to be half a year short of the 2 year requirement (at the time of an assumed partner visa application) , your visa application will be denied. You two will HAVE to prove full 2 years cohabitation. But perhaps by then, there will be other options?

I mean, at the risk of sounding intrusive, the absolute worst case scenario, you could just have a quick wedding , once we know what the status of EU national in the UK, post Brexit is?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Actually no, if you aren't already living together now, and if you are going to be half a year short of the 2 year requirement (at the time of an assumed partner visa application) , your visa application will be denied. You two will HAVE to prove full 2 years cohabitation. But perhaps by then, there will be other options?

I mean, at the risk of sounding intrusive, the absolute worst case scenario, you could just have a quick wedding , once we know what the status of EU national in the UK, post Brexit is?
We would have two years full cohabitation by about December 2019 which is obviously far after Brexit day, so that's where the issue comes in. Hopefully all will be fine. He has good, transferable skills and I'm hoping that will give him a good chance to stay.

At this point I think we'll settle together in the UK and play it by ear for a year until we know what's going to happen fully. He really likes the UK, the people, and was excited to live here, so leaving is something we don't want to do at all, but it can't be ruled out currently. We won't be married for a few years yet, at least, and marrying for a legal reason doesn't sit right with either of us and we won't do that.

Ireland was always in the pipeline anyway, but with the smaller market for jobs, probably housing too, it could be even more problematic in itself than trying to stay here in the UK.

My biggest fear is having him move his whole life over here and to have him need to leave. I would feel awfully guilty. I don't want to imagine the financial issues that would put the pair of us through either.
 
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