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hi my partner and i are purchasing a property in france as an unmarried couple i have children from a previous relationship what is the best way to purchase the property so we can look after the remaining partner when one of us dies? thank you hope someone can help
 

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hi my partner and i are purchasing a property in france as an unmarried couple i have children from a previous relationship what is the best way to purchase the property so we can look after the remaining partner when one of us dies? thank you hope someone can help
Hi,
I assume your partner has no children.

If you also want to protect your childrens interests, you can buy the title (nue -propriété ) and your partner can buy the life interest (usufruit) in the property. This is called buying in "demembrement"
If you die first the children inherit the title to the property, but your partner conserves the right to live undisturbed in the property during his lifetime ; on his death the life interest disappears and your children take full ownership.
If he dies his life interest ceases and you own the property outright.
You should discuss this with a good english -fluent notaire , taking a copy of this post with you.
 

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In August the 15 th you will be able to write a will leaving your property in accordance with UK law ie to whom you want.If you die before that date than the property will be divided up according to French law which mean all offspring will inherit a share.However be aware that taxes will still be applied in accordance with French law and while I may be wrong if you are just living together without any kind of official recognition eg civil ceremony PACS or marriage the surviving partner will pay tax at the non blood relative rate of 60% and it is the individual who pays not the estate.Do as Parsnips suggests and take proper advice from a notaire or uk solicitor who specialises in French tax and inheritance
 

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Crabbers

I'm sure you are correct. However, I would not want to be the first person to make use of this law - Change can take a long time in France. Personally, I would go for French wills, and English wills for any assets that remain in the UK.

DejW

In August the 15 th you will be able to write a will leaving your property in accordance with UK law ie to whom you want.If you die before that date than the property will be divided up according to French law which mean all offspring will inherit a share.However be aware that taxes will still be applied in accordance with French law and while I may be wrong if you are just living together without any kind of official recognition eg civil ceremony PACS or marriage the surviving partner will pay tax at the non blood relative rate of 60% and it is the individual who pays not the estate.Do as Parsnips suggests and take proper advice from a notaire or uk solicitor who specialises in French tax and inheritance
 

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In August the 15 th you will be able to write a will leaving your property in accordance with UK law ie to whom you want.If you die before that date than the property will be divided up according to French law which mean all offspring will inherit a share.However be aware that taxes will still be applied in accordance with French law and while I may be wrong if you are just living together without any kind of official recognition eg civil ceremony PACS or marriage the surviving partner will pay tax at the non blood relative rate of 60% and it is the individual who pays not the estate.Do as Parsnips suggests and take proper advice from a notaire or uk solicitor who specialises in French tax and inheritance
Hi,
The procedure I suggest , if it is followed ,leads to no inheritance tax on the partner who has bought the life-interest, and the other partner's children get full ownership with the full tax allowances between parent and child (100 000€ each , then reduced rates).
In this case the availability of UK law is irrelevant, it is the tax implications which are important.
 
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