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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Perhaps I am just getting over excited..... ( I still have about one year.) I have started looking for an emigration lawyer in Washington DC to assist in my resident visa application. I have not had great results and started thinking perhaps I should be looking for an immigration lawyer based in Mexico to get things going.

At this point I believe I will be going to either San Miguel de Allende or Chapala. Does anyone know of a reasonably priced lawyer in either area that should be recommended?
 

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Perhaps I am just getting over excited..... ( I still have about one year.) I have started looking for an emigration lawyer in Washington DC to assist in my resident visa application. I have not had great results and started thinking perhaps I should be looking for an immigration lawyer based in Mexico to get things going.

At this point I believe I will be going to either San Miguel de Allende or Chapala. Does anyone know of a reasonably priced lawyer in either area that should be recommended?
Before you head off to an emigration lawyer, visit the Mexican Consulate and ask about the requisites for a visa. It's really straight forward.
 

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Perhaps I am just getting over excited..... ( I still have about one year.) I have started looking for an emigration lawyer in Washington DC to assist in my resident visa application. I have not had great results and started thinking perhaps I should be looking for an immigration lawyer based in Mexico to get things going.

At this point I believe I will be going to either San Miguel de Allende or Chapala. Does anyone know of a reasonably priced lawyer in either area that should be recommended?
I can't help you with a recommendation for a lawyer in San Miguel or Chapala since I live in Mexico City. However, I can't imagine that an American lawyer would be able to help you with Mexican government immigration procedures. Unless your situation is unique as regards financial requirements for eligibility for a residence visa, you most likely won't need a lawyer. You might contact your nearest Mexican Consulate in the US for information about applying for a residence visa - perhaps having the facts laid out for you will help you relax and stop worrying so much.
 

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AllBbear, I truly don't think you need a lawyer. You can start the application at the Mexican Consulate in DC yourself.

I could be wrong about this, but whether you have a lawyer or not you are still going to have to appear at an INM (Instituto Nacional de Migración) office in Mexico to finish the application and actually get the card. I suppose if having a lawyer would eliminate the in-person visit to the INM office in Mexico it might be worth it, but I can't imagine INM not demanding an in-person visit, representation or not. Perhaps some here can enlighten us on that subject further.

The consulate in DC will verify your income and the other documents required, which are listed on the DC Mexican Consulate's web page the link will bring up. It's in Spanish but you can muddle through with translation software, and you can call them: (202) 7361008. There may be an English version on the DC consulate site, but you can research that yourself.

At the INM office in Mexico they will give you a login to their web site where you can watch the internal steps towards getting the visa as they are completed. When it's time to come back, they will post a message for you to appear again.

The entire process of getting a residente permanente visa only took me 32 days from the first visit to the Mexican Consulate in El Paso, TX to picking up my card at the INM office near the Cordova Bridge in Ciudad Juárez. It involved 1 trip to the Mexican Consulate, and three trips to the INM office in Juarez during the 32 days.

The fees I was charged amounted to $38 US to the Mexican Consulate, and $3800 pesos to the INM office in Mexico.

It was a pretty smooth process, and at no time did I feel I didn't understand what they were asking of me.

There were a lot of details involved, of course, but your question went to the need for a lawyer, so no need to go any further at this point until you post more specific questions.

Good luck! The process for me, at least, was no big deal at all. And welcome to the forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Emigration lawyer

Thanks all for the quick responses........ I have the complete guide to applying for visa and have done a lot of reading in preparation. I think that I am going right for a resident visa rather than renewing a visitors visa several times. Because I don't speak Spanish (I am starting classes Jan. 7th.) I am very intimidated by the forms and the multiple possibilities. I guess its just laziness and the fear of making a mistake that makes me want to hire a lawyer to walk me through.

Please tell me if I am crazy for wanting to go this route....

Thanx,
Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
One of my big problem/question is that most of my $$$ is tied up in my house which I will be selling 6 months before moving. Not sure how to state necessary income.
 

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Thanks all for the quick responses........ I have the complete guide to applying for visa and have done a lot of reading in preparation. I think that I am going right for a resident visa rather than renewing a visitors visa several times. Because I don't speak Spanish (I am starting classes Jan. 7th.) I am very intimidated by the forms and the multiple possibilities. I guess its just laziness and the fear of making a mistake that makes me want to hire a lawyer to walk me through.

Please tell me if I am crazy for wanting to go this route....

Thanx,
Bob
I sent you a PM
And congratulations on your Spanish classes!!!
You are not crazy for looking for legal advise, it's a very important decision you are making.
 

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There are facilitators, who aren't attorneys, conveniently located in many of the communities where expats retire and who help people walk-through the immigration application process. A very many people find the services of such persons helpful. My suggestion is that once you choose your future destination and arrive there that you network with other expats to locate just such a facilitator.
 

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Please do not think that lawyers are well informed on the new immigration requirements. Most are not!
There are a few, but only a few. Frankly, you just need to meet the list or requirements given to you by the Mexican consulate. If you need help with the forms, they may be able to assist you. You must do more than state your financial details; they will want a few months of bank statements, and they may not count your home or other assets. If you need that to qualify, you might want to wait until you sell the house and apply three months later, with the money sitting in the bank. Some consulates will count that, but others may insist on seeing steady retirement income being deposited. You will not know until you apply.
 

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Not sure what the Real Estate market is like where you live but name a selling date is wishful thinking in most cases

I believe there is an Assets option if you don't have the income ... but that could easily be in the $250k range
 

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I do not think it is an assets category but rather an Investment category...like investments that generate income instead of a pension or SS check....

I know an immigration lawyer in SMA if you still think you want one, he speaks perfect English, I will
PM you his information.........
 

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Thanks all for the quick responses........ I have the complete guide to applying for visa and have done a lot of reading in preparation. I think that I am going right for a resident visa rather than renewing a visitors visa several times. Because I don't speak Spanish (I am starting classes Jan. 7th.) I am very intimidated by the forms and the multiple possibilities. I guess its just laziness and the fear of making a mistake that makes me want to hire a lawyer to walk me through.

Please tell me if I am crazy for wanting to go this route....

Thanx,
Bob
Of course not, if you've got the cash and want to pay someone to pave the way, go for it by all means. A bi-lingual person is a great asset in the beginning. I've hired translators, for instance, on several occasions and found them to well worth the money. But, really, the visa process is not that big of a deal if you change your mind and decide to do it yourself.
 

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You have two possibilities for a residence visa: Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente. The former will be good for a year, then may be renewed for three more years, after which you will apply for Residente Permanente or have to leave Mexico for a while and start all over again.
So, if you can meet the requirements, go for Residente Permanente and not have to renew again or even contact INM unless it is just to change your address or marital status.
If you can only meet the financial requirements for Temporal, then you can still go that route.
The only other option is a tourist permit good for 180 day stays; not renewable in Mexico.
 

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You have two possibilities for a residence visa: Residente Temporal or Residente Permanente. The former will be good for a year, then may be renewed for three more years, after which you will apply for Residente Permanente or have to leave Mexico for a while and start all over again.
So, if you can meet the requirements, go for Residente Permanente and not have to renew again or even contact INM unless it is just to change your address or marital status.
If you can only meet the financial requirements for Temporal, then you can still go that route.
The only other option is a tourist permit good for 180 day stays; not renewable in Mexico.
RV, have your noticed that the monthly financial requirement for Residente Permanente seems to vary depending on the Mexican Consulate? On the DC page I linked to for the OP they want proof of $2500 a month, which is about $500 more than I could prove up for the consulate in El Paso. Yet I sailed right through. I also seem to remember hearing different figures for monthly requirements here on the forum.

Any idea why?
 

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RV, have your noticed that the monthly financial requirement for Residente Permanente seems to vary depending on the Mexican Consulate? On the DC page I linked to for the OP they want proof of $2500 a month, which is about $500 more than I could prove up for the consulate in El Paso. Yet I sailed right through. I also seem to remember hearing different figures for monthly requirements here on the forum.

Any idea why?
I'm not RV but will venture a response. The actual financial requirements are multiples of the daily minimum wage effective in Mexico City and certain other parts of the country, currently 64.76 MXN. For Residente Permanente, the required average monthly income is 500x that, or 32,380 MXN. The dollar equivalent fluctuates with the exchange rate, obviously, so consulates probably state an approximate rounded figure.
 

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Makaloco explained it well. The dollar amount would, threfore, fluctuate and you can be certain that the consulates do not re-calculate that amount daily, if ever. Just smile and provide everything they ask for and hope that your numbers are sufficient.
 

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El Paso, you wrote:

"The entire process of getting a residente permanente visa only took me 32 days from the first visit to the Mexican Consulate in El Paso, TX to picking up my card at the INM office near the Cordova Bridge in Ciudad Juárez. It involved 1 trip to the Mexican Consulate, and three trips to the INM office in Juarez during the 32 days."

We're pretty much starting the process that you've just finished and would greatly prefer to finish the INM process across the border in Nogales, MX from our home in Tucson, AZ.

Were you able to apply for the Permanent Resident visa without having to have had a Temporary Visa before? And did the INM office in Juarez ask for what I think I've heard called "comprobante" (copies of utility bills to prove residency in that INM office's geographical area)? I have heard they can (and sometimes do) ask for that proof.

Do you speak Spanish or did you feel you needed to speak Spanish to complete your interviews with the INM office?

I have also been searching the internet for a list of INM offices in Mexico with little success.
 

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And did the INM office in Juarez ask for what I think I've heard called "comprobante" (copies of utility bills to prove residency in that INM office's geographical area)? I have heard they can (and sometimes do) ask for that proof.
I don't know about Juarez, but in the past the La Paz office has asked for a utility bill. This year they have been asking applicants to draw a rough map showing how to get to their residence. This is done at the office, in front of the agent. I'm in the Residente Permanente process now and just got fingerprinted.

I have also been searching the internet for a list of INM offices in Mexico with little success.
Here's an interactive page showing INM locations and their hours:
Oficinas y Horarios - Instituto Nacional de Migración
 

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El Paso, you wrote:

"The entire process of getting a residente permanente visa only took me 32 days from the first visit to the Mexican Consulate in El Paso, TX to picking up my card at the INM office near the Cordova Bridge in Ciudad Juárez. It involved 1 trip to the Mexican Consulate, and three trips to the INM office in Juarez during the 32 days."

We're pretty much starting the process that you've just finished and would greatly prefer to finish the INM process across the border in Nogales, MX from our home in Tucson, AZ.

Were you able to apply for the Permanent Resident visa without having to have had a Temporary Visa before? And did the INM office in Juarez ask for what I think I've heard called "comprobante" (copies of utility bills to prove residency in that INM office's geographical area)? I have heard they can (and sometimes do) ask for that proof.

Do you speak Spanish or did you feel you needed to speak Spanish to complete your interviews with the INM office?

I have also been searching the internet for a list of INM offices in Mexico with little success.
I hadn't had a visa before except tourist visas for trips beyond the "trade zone" along the border, no.

The question about Spanish goes to the third question so I'll answer it first. My Spanish is good enough to shop, introduce myself, ask simple questions, and pass a few pleasantries. But for something anything complicated, I try to bring a friend.

The INM office, though, did have a nice young lady that helped me on the first visit and went out of her way the next two visits to be the one who called me to the desk when my number came up.

I told her I had not moved to Mexico because I did not yet have a visa. She accepted the address of the hotel in which I was staying that trip.

It sailed straight through, but as many here have pointed out, what's accepted in one office might not be in a different one.

So good luck!
 
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