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Hello,

I'm coming over to Canada (Toronto, for the most part) under the IEC work permit programme. I just wondered if any of you who are already over there or have worked in Canada in the past could confirm how easy or difficult you found it to get temporary/contract/seasonal work?

I'm not interested in working at ski resorts, which is what most people seem to be doing. I have a background in arts admin, higher education, and the creative industries, and would ideally like to get work in this field, but I will consider anything that pays the bills. (Office work, shops, bars, cinemas, cafes.) Did you find you encountered obstacles due to not having permanently residency? Any tips?!

Katie :)
 

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With your willingness to work in a few different areas you really shouldn't have a problem. This is especially true if you're basing yourself in Toronto which has the opportunities that any metropolis will give you.

If you need something soon after landing then look at temp agencies for short term/ contract work. Start contacting a few and put the feelers out there and see what comes back. You may find it a little more difficult to get into the particular creative industry you want to though working an initial job where you meet lots of people will help you network.

Canada has a lot of new immigrants and temp workers so you shouldn't get too much push back. Yes there are certainly some people who have pre conceived ideas about working holiday makers though there are plenty of employers out there. Resumes in Canada don't require you to provide too much information so I wouldn't include your visa status, except perhaps in a specific cover letter. I have found that telling employers you have a reason to be staying here a while(family friends etc) helps to make them more comfortable that you won't up and leave in a few weeks. A year (or the option of more) is fine for many employers, especially in jobs that don't require lengthy training. My biggest problem was that all my employment history was short term as I was always moving countries so it just took a bit of reassuring to new employers.

Other people here might have different struggles though I haven't encountered many problems. Having a good command of the English language (or French in Quebec) and being well presented goes a long way!!
 
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