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I am considering a long term rental in the ICON in the hotel zone in Puerto Vallarta. Does anyone have any experience with this property? Thanks for any info you can provide.
I don't have any info, but I'd like to have your money.

Looked at the website, sorry but to me it looks like Miami Beach, Abu Dabi in PV. But everyone has their own tastes and if living in a foreign country the same way you in your home country is what you want, this looks like the place do to it, your contact with real Mexico should be very superficial and rare.

But I'd love to vacation there - what a joint - classy!
 

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I don't have any info, but I'd like to have your money.

Looked at the website, sorry but to me it looks like Miami Beach, Abu Dabi in PV. But everyone has their own tastes and if living in a foreign country the same way you in your home country is what you want, this looks like the place do to it, your contact with real Mexico should be very superficial and rare.

But I'd love to vacation there - what a joint - classy!
Maybe the OP is planning on a very long-term vacation in this classy joint.
 

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I am considering a long term rental in the ICON in the hotel zone in Puerto Vallarta. Does anyone have any experience with this property? Thanks for any info you can provide.
A vendor of mine has a condo in that area. Very, very nice, clean, and posh. They say whenever I am in Puerto Vallarta I am free to stay there if I want. I am never in PV for business but I may need to schedule a weekend vacation to see although I don't think my company would like for me to take "handouts" from vendors. I've been to PV a few times in the past on separate vacations and I know of this area, however never spent any time there.

Thats all the information I have, sorry not so useful.
 

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Our intro to Mexico was made by borrowing our neighbor's condo at Bay View Grand in PV (Google it.) for a week - 10th floor, 3 bedrooms, guards, gates. etc etc. We did have the use of his car, so we were not totally cut off, we shopped, etc but at $400K USD it was/is a very expensive enclave and not the Mexico we found when we went exploring and found Ajijic.

Luckily (for us, not for them) they have been unable to sell it and if luck continues (badly for them, good for us) we will have a beachfront property to vacation in after we set up our home in Ajijic. [BTW-we are not mercenaries, they are our best friends here and we will miss them terribly when we emigrate, other than leaving our kids, they are a close second.)

And that is the point/difference: we consider staying at their place in PV as a vacation - it is luxurious and very, very familiar. Our move to Ajijic is to establish a home, to have an adventure, to not have the same-o same-o.

Nothing wrong in going the other way, BVG or ICON, that is why they make chocolate ice cream.
 

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Our intro to Mexico was made by borrowing our neighbor's condo at Bay View Grand in PV (Google it.) for a week - 10th floor, 3 bedrooms, guards, gates. etc etc. We did have the use of his car, so we were not totally cut off, we shopped, etc but at $400K USD it was/is a very expensive enclave and not the Mexico we found when we went exploring and found Ajijic.
I agree that THAT is not the life I want (or can afford) to live in Mexico. I live in a decent house right now in Monterrey with all of the Mexi-modern efficiencies, however I love when we go for 2 weeks every summer to visit my wives parents and extended familydown on the Oaxacan coast.

They have a small, humble, 2 room concrete house with a garage in front where her father runs his business. I sleep in a hammock with a fan on me every night (no AC) and critters constantly coming in and out of the house like they live there. Chickens, little lizards, misc little dogs, birds, and even once we had a fiddler crab make it way over to the house from the market a block away....must have escaped from one of the seafood stalls!

Thats the Mexico I love.
 

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I agree that THAT is not the life I want (or can afford) to live in Mexico. I live in a decent house right now in Monterrey with all of the Mexi-modern efficiencies, however I love when we go for 2 weeks every summer to visit my wives parents and extended familydown on the Oaxacan coast.

They have a small, humble, 2 room concrete house with a garage in front where her father runs his business. I sleep in a hammock with a fan on me every night (no AC) and critters constantly coming in and out of the house like they live there. Chickens, little lizards, misc little dogs, birds, and even once we had a fiddler crab make it way over to the house from the market a block away....must have escaped from one of the seafood stalls!

Thats the Mexico I love.
I wounder how long you loved it if you had to live like that all the time. Its nice to
visit and then go home.
 

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Conor, at this stage of your life, do you think you could live the way your wife's family does full-time? Would your wife want to?
At this stage? No. Its more about my 3 children. I need them to have the best education that we can afford, so sad to say that education down on the coast is not as good as in the more populated cities in Mexico...so the cities is where I will stay for the needs of my family . My wife does not want or need to live there full time and neither do I. I realistically can't because of my career and where I need to be geographically.

However, when the kids are gone and have their own lives, then we will move to the coast and live. Hopefully it will all still be there in 30 years.

We love to vacation there and for me, its an escape from reality. Life moves slow and there is no timetable. The beach is 2 km away from her parents house and for 50 pesos you can drink 2 ice cold Victorias and eat fish, rice, and salad at one of the beachside comadors.
 

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Unlike Conor, I did not grow up in poverty, neither was I rich. I worked hard, as we all must have, acquired a lot and at this stage of life, a lot of that is "been there, done that" and there is no thrill in it any more.

We look forward to shed, shed, shed simplify, to not always stocking the referig and pantry to the gills, just buying what we need. You don't need to come from poverty to know what is important and that things are not always that.
 

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Unlike Conor, I did not grow up in poverty, neither was I rich. I worked hard, as we all must have, acquired a lot and at this stage of life, a lot of that is "been there, done that" and there is no thrill in it any more.

We look forward to shed, shed, shed simplify, to not always stocking the referig and pantry to the gills, just buying what we need. You don't need to come from poverty to know what is important and that things are not always that.
:clap2:Well said and totally in sync with your experience and your current attitude. I believe that we arrive at this point in life because we can say "been there, done that." Someone that cannot say that may have a goal of "getting there and doing that."
 

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Not until I was about 12 or 13 did my family finally start to have a better life. My father and mother worked really hard for my brother and I and I plan to do the same for my children. I worked very hard on our farm and I know what a dollar is worth....especially when you work for it. I find that children today don't understand what hard work is. I will know that my children do. They are probably tired of hearing stories of waking up at 5am to feed the cattle and the other livestock, just in time to get showered and get on the school bus. Then when we came home, we had to clean the pens. Wintertime was the hardest. Pulling firewood from about 200 yards away from the house in 3ft of snow, mending electric fence, spreading manure over 4 acres, and then if there was time we could ice fish in our pond. I loved every minute of it.

I plan to return to my roots eventually, however with a little more money in the bank. Thats my life plan.
 

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Not until I was about 12 or 13 did my family finally start to have a better life. My father and mother worked really hard for my brother and I and I plan to do the same for my children. I worked very hard on our farm and I know what a dollar is worth....especially when you work for it. I find that children today don't understand what hard work is. I will know that my children do. They are probably tired of hearing stories of waking up at 5am to feed the cattle and the other livestock, just in time to get showered and get on the school bus. Then when we came home, we had to clean the pens. Wintertime was the hardest. Pulling firewood from about 200 yards away from the house in 3ft of snow, mending electric fence, spreading manure over 4 acres, and then if there was time we could ice fish in our pond. I loved every minute of it.

I plan to return to my roots eventually, however with a little more money in the bank. Thats my life plan.
Good on you, man. Teaching our children is one of our most important jobs.
And just like of lot of us, we've done our jobs well and deserve the rewards...and I do not mean material things, they are only trappings. Our rewards are inner peace and serenity, a joy in ourselves which comes from our labors, be they kids, grand kids, a little money in the bank so you can have the necessities or the back 40, listening to the cows.
 

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I was a single mom with four little kids, and when we didn't get child support for a year, less than a year after the divorce, I learned what poverty was. I'd never experienced it, before that.

But from that year, and the following years of catching up, I was able to learn to be grateful for a roof over my head, and enough food to feed the five of us.

The best part was that my kids learned, of necessity, the difference between want and need.

When the two youngest were in their teens, my husband and I were able to build a 2100 sq ft house. It is not fancy. But the kids all talk about our mansion.
 

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I was a single mom with four little kids, and when we didn't get child support for a year, less than a year after the divorce, I learned what poverty was. I'd never experienced it, before that.

But from that year, and the following years of catching up, I was able to learn to be grateful for a roof over my head, and enough food to feed the five of us.

The best part was that my kids learned, of necessity, the difference between want and need.

When the two youngest were in their teens, my husband and I were able to build a 2100 sq ft house. It is not fancy. But the kids all talk about our mansion.
Thanks for sharing your story with us. How wonderful that your second husband turned out to be a good guy!
 
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