Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was told that I should get a voltage regulator for my American purchased electronic equipment, is this true?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
I was told that I should get a voltage regulator for my American purchased electronic equipment, is this true?
True. They are not expensive here, so no need to bring with you. Don't overuse them, they eat electricity since they modulate by "sluffing off" power. Almost more important is to have/establish three-prong grounded wiring. These are two different issues, but both should be addressed. If you buy appliances or electronics in Mexico, they are supposed to have already taken into account the voltage range of 110 to 135. Stuff you bring with you from NoB is presumably much more sensitive to these wide variations in voltage. I think the priorities are to ground, measure voltages over time, then decide what might need a regulator. Unplugging during thunderstorms isn't a bad idea either. ¡Qué le vaya bien!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I have UPS battery back up / voltage regulators in every room. I brought them from the US and they run US$35 or so each. Stops everything from shutting off when the power goes off for 5 or 10 minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have UPS battery back up / voltage regulators in every room. I brought them from the US and they run US$35 or so each. Stops everything from shutting off when the power goes off for 5 or 10 minutes.
where can i find these units?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,041 Posts
One of the UPS decisions along with power is stand by versus line interractive.
Standby is much cheaper but only works with outages. Line interractive monitors and fixes line fluctuations while receiving power and then acts as backup with outage.
I have a very sensitive device where I need prevent fluctuations. My issue now is how to protect the UPS as in tonaca room on the roof. It's enclosed but heavily ventilated as holds gas tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
UPS units are called "no-breaks" in Spanish (yes, in Spanish). Some places you can buy them in Mexico are at CostCo and at office stores like Office Max and Office Depot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,726 Posts
On this topic, I know nothing because we don't have any of these units. Laptops don't require them. All of our other appliances were purchased in Mexico and we haven't lost even one in nine years. However, a next door neighbor, a Mexican who brought all of his appliances from the USA, where he had a business, lost three TV sets and two refrigerators in a surge. We were on the same transformer and we lost nothing. There is a message there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
On this topic, I know nothing because we don't have any of these units. Laptops don't require them. All of our other appliances were purchased in Mexico and we haven't lost even one in nine years. However, a next door neighbor, a Mexican who brought all of his appliances from the USA, where he had a business, lost three TV sets and two refrigerators in a surge. We were on the same transformer and we lost nothing. There is a message there.
why are they not needed for laptops, is it because they have a battery? when i run my laptop, i do not have my battery installed (it saves the life of the battery) would that make a difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,726 Posts
Laptops don't need special protection devices because, generally, the charger which powers the laptop is capable of using multiple voltages and delivering the correct voltage to the laptop. Also, you can leave the laptop unplugged whenever you aren't actually using it. Keeping the battery charged, allow you to use the laptop safely, even in violent storms, without being plugged in at all.
I've been doing that since 2001 in Mexico and my two Apple laptops are still just fine. I did have to replace the battery in the old one when it was about five years old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
I think they are more important for the power variances, not the outages, although they are good for that, too. I was not used to the variations in voltage that I've experienced here, and that's been problematic for my computer. I haven't gotten around to buying one some regulators, but this thread has reminded me to put it on my list. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,726 Posts
Remember, those voltage regulators and universal power supplies do use power themselves and may bump you into the punishing DAC rate for electricity, since they are on all the time. If your computer is a desktop and you are thinking of a new one anytime soon, you might want to consider a laptop instead of a desktop and eliminate the need for additional equipment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
RV ******: this should probably be a separate topic, but i'm not sure (please move it if so).

when i moved to the lake chapala area about two years ago, i brought my fairly new HP laptop with me. it's now dying a slow painful death and my "computer guy" recommended that i just buy a new one. (FYI: he doesn't sell computers -- just repairs them.) he suggested that an Apple would be the best as it is "more stable."

my question: i know you love your apple computers and this thread indicates that you bought them here. where is a good place in the lake chapala area to purchase same, and is it really less costly to go NOB to purchase one (as i was told by a friend). my friend said i would save 30-40% by purchasing NOB, but i'm not sure that's enough to even pay for my airfare and, as you have said, by purchasing in mexico i would be under warrranty here. correct?

thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,726 Posts
There are several dealers in Guadalajara and I am most familiar with Hall Microsystems, on Yañez, immediately off Glorieta Minerva, on your right. They also come to Lake Chapala twice a month, on Thursday noon at MBE, last I knew. My contact, years ago, when I needed a new battery, which they brought to MBE for me, was [email protected] and she speaks English. The company website is Hall Microcomputadoras | Distribuidor autorizado Apple and you could also call them with the information given there.
I bought mine directly from the online Apple Store at apple.com where you can also search for deals. I had it shipped to a US address when we were going north anyway. If that isn't an option, or if a friend can't bring it to you (unpacked of course), You can also go to Office Max or Office Depot, etc. in Guadalajara to look at what they have.
You will love a Mac laptop. There is also a Mac Users Group that meets at The Lake Chapala Society, once a month.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I was told that I should get a voltage regulator for my American purchased electronic equipment, is this true?
An Uninterpretable Power Supply (UPS) is best used as a voltage stabilizer and surge protector. Please do not confuse a UPS with a non-battery surge protector, they are two completely different devices. A UPS contains a battery (Usually lead acid gel) that is constantly "floating" on the supply line. The AC mains charge the battery and the DC output of the battery is converted to Alternating Current of the correct voltage and frequency, which is usually 60 Hertz @ 120 volts +/-. When the voltage of the AC mains supply exceeds a predetermined range of low or high voltages, or the AC mains voltage is dropped (blackout), the solid state switching module of the UPS disconnects the connected devices from the AC mains and transfers the load to battery power. This transfer occurs within milliseconds of time. When the AC mains voltage has returned and/or stabilized, the UPS switches from the battery back to the AC mains supply. The run time on battery depends upon the capacity of the battery and the device load connected to the UPS. I have a UPS of 330 Watt capacity which will power my computer and peripherals for about 30 minutes in a blackout situation. The AC line conditions which damage computers and other electronic equipment is not the blackout, but the quick, a few seconds or less, drop and then return in AC mains voltage which produces large surge voltages which are deadly to most computers and electronic equipment. The UPS is the device that protects this equipment from these destructive voltage surges. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Laptop power

Laptops don't need special protection devices because, generally, the charger which powers the laptop is capable of using multiple voltages and delivering the correct voltage to the laptop. Also, you can leave the laptop unplugged whenever you aren't actually using it. Keeping the battery charged, allow you to use the laptop safely, even in violent storms, without being plugged in at all.
I've been doing that since 2001 in Mexico and my two Apple laptops are still just fine. I did have to replace the battery in the old one when it was about five years old.
All laptops operate on DC voltage provided by either battery or your AC/DC converter that plugs into the wall. These devices are fairly robust and provide a well-regulated DC output. For example, my Dell AC/DC converter will accept 100 to 240 Volts AC at 50 to 60 Hz.
 
G

·
If you live in an area that experiences thunder storms, remember to also disconnect your internet cable from your modem - a nearby lightning strike is more likely to fry your equipment than a voltage spike!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I work in Mexico City at least 2 weeks every month and computer/internet service is critical to my work. For any electronics, especially computers (including laptops), I would recommend a reliable UPS (as stated before, UPS devices provide a stabilized power bridge between your equipment and the local electric company).

I also keep on hand a small transformer that will allow me to run my critical computer equipment (laptop, Internet router) from a 12v supply such as the car. I have discovered that electrical service in Mexico City is certainly less than reliable, and I need to have a backup plan uninterrupted Internet service. It seems that the electrical service is more unreliable than the Telmex Internet service.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Hi all.

Okay, I am in technology, so I feel a bit stupid asking this question. I've never had to use a UPS in other countries, but I did know that there could be issues down here with my USA products. Thank you for this thread.

Now, on the subject of my HP laptop. I have never had an issue with my HP laptop overheating. I have the model that does not overheat; as you may know, there was an announcement regarding some issues with HP laptops overheating. Luckily, mine does not overheat, nor is it one of the models.

However, mine is starting to overheat, and the fan is not keeping up with the heating issues. I do not know if this is due to the voltage issue or not, since someone mentioned HPs above.

I live in Condesa in Mexico City, and have had no problems thus far with electricity, excepting the occasional five minute blackout and issues for a couple of weeks after a small earthquake.

I surmise that you will recommend the UPS, although I am only used to using very high end corporate surge protectors (for HP high end servers and the like) on my systems. I am overkill on those things.

Here is a list of my electronics that I brought with me to date:

1. HP Laptop

2. HP netbook

3. IPhone (which will be defunct until I know for sure I will be staying; then will get a plan with telcel. Now I just use it for my music and just charge as needed.

4. Kindle; I just use it to charge and stuff.

5. hair dryer and curling iron. To be frank, if those blow (no pun intended, I have to get another from US. Yeah, I am a girl, and I have to have top of the line. My hair is just a big deal to me.

So the biggies are my laptop and netbook.

Any ideas on the overheating and UPS needs? I work on my laptop hours every day. When I am not using it, I go to hibernation, which shuts down the cpu, which cools off the system. But I use it so much, it's getting really hot. It's a really powerful system.

Thanks in advance!

Michelle
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top