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Discussion Starter #1
Hello. I was studied in Pridnestrovie (Moldova) and have bachelor's degree in the heat and gas supply and ventilation specialty. If I translate in English my diploma and get an apostille for one will this make a difference when getting work visa and get job in USA? I'm interested work as HVAC/R technician. Thanks.
 

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For a work visa for the US you need to find an employer to sponsor you for a job first. So, to answer your question, any employer is going to want to see all documentation in English.
 
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For a work visa for the US you need to find an employer to sponsor you for a job first. So, to answer your question, any employer is going to want to see all documentation in English.
Thanks. One more question: There is a site that can help find job and get sponsor (if it is allowed here I write a link to that site). Can such sites really help get the work visa? Maybe anyone use such sites.
 

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Thanks. One more question: There is a site that can help find job and get sponsor (if it is allowed here I write a link to that site). Can such sites really help get the work visa? Maybe anyone use such sites.
Majority of those sites want big bucks to 'work on your behalf'. No guarantee of getting you a job. Would not recommend you use one.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Can I get job offer, if I don't have any experience in HVAC? Is it possible or I must have any experience?
 

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Can I get job offer, if I don't have any experience in HVAC? Is it possible or I must have any experience?
Technically, yes, but practically no.

In order to qualify for a speciality occupation employer sponsored visa (the H1B) the position must meet the following criteria:
  • Have a minimum entry requirement of a Bachelor's or higher degree or its equivalent.
  • The degree requirement for the job is common to the industry or the job is so complex or unique that it can be performed only by an individual with a degree.
  • The employer normally requires a degree or its equivalent for the position.
  • The nature of the specific duties is so specialized and complex that the knowledge required to perform the duties is usually associated with the attainment of a bachelor's or higher degree.
So assumjng that a HVAC/R technician position meets those requirements, then technically, an employer could sponsor you.

However practically, the number of H1B visas issued each year is limited so simply finding an employer willing to sponsor you is not, on its own enough. For entry level graduate position, I would expect the time and cost for an employer would make it unlikely for them to go through the effort unless there was another reason. Think of it from the US employer's perspective... it is far easier for them to hire a recent graduate from the local university.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Technically, yes, but practically no.

In order to qualify for a speciality occupation employer sponsored visa (the H1B) the position must meet the following criteria:
  • Have a minimum entry requirement of a Bachelor's or higher degree or its equivalent.
  • The degree requirement for the job is common to the industry or the job is so complex or unique that it can be performed only by an individual with a degree.
  • The employer normally requires a degree or its equivalent for the position.
  • The nature of the specific duties is so specialized and complex that the knowledge required to perform the duties is usually associated with the attainment of a bachelor's or higher degree.
So assumjng that a HVAC/R technician position meets those requirements, then technically, an employer could sponsor you.

However practically, the number of H1B visas issued each year is limited so simply finding an employer willing to sponsor you is not, on its own enough. For entry level graduate position, I would expect the time and cost for an employer would make it unlikely for them to go through the effort unless there was another reason. Think of it from the US employer's perspective... it is far easier for them to hire a recent graduate from the local university.
If I have experience in another work, but it can use in HVAC systems is it can help me in this case?
 

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Why don't you do your research and networking and see if you can get an employer to offer you a job? That is your first task.

You are asking questions no-one on this forum can answer.
 

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Why don't you do your research and networking and see if you can get an employer to offer you a job? That is your first task.

You are asking questions no-one on this forum can answer.
I read some information about visas, but I want to understand how are things going actually. So I ask people who can know more than me. I'm trying to evaluate my chances of getting a work visa.
 

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I read some information about visas, but I want to understand how are things going actually. So I ask people who can know more than me. I'm trying to evaluate my chances of getting a work visa.
Unless you have exceptional skills, in an area which is in demand. and where companies are willing to spend time and money to get candidates from overseas,then your chances are pretty slim.
I don't think there is a shortage of a heating/ventilation/airconditioning technicians (ie one who installs or maintains such equipment) in the US.
 

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Unless you have exceptional skills, in an area which is in demand. and where companies are willing to spend time and money to get candidates from overseas,then your chances are pretty slim.
I don't think there is a shortage of a heating/ventilation/airconditioning technicians (ie one who installs or maintains such equipment) in the US.
Ok. Another case, then. If I go to the USA with a touristic visa, get job offer and then change from a touristic visa to a work visa to I can work. Is it possible (including from the point of view of the law)? In this case will job offer get easier or is it no matter?
 

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If you go to the US with a tourist visa and find a job, you will have to return back home while the employer lays the groundwork for work authorization (if that is possible for the job). If that is successful, then you'll be notified that you can apply for the appropriate visa at the consulate in your home country.

Just be aware that getting authorization to hire a foreigner is a somewhat expensive process for an employer (and especially difficult with unemployment high as it is now in the US). Most potential employers choose to avoid problems in the immigration department by refusing to speak to foreigners about jobs unless they already have a visa permitting them to work in the US.
 

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If you go to the US with a tourist visa and find a job, you will have to return back home while the employer lays the groundwork for work authorization (if that is possible for the job). If that is successful, then you'll be notified that you can apply for the appropriate visa at the consulate in your home country.

Just be aware that getting authorization to hire a foreigner is a somewhat expensive process for an employer (and especially difficult with unemployment high as it is now in the US). Most potential employers choose to avoid problems in the immigration department by refusing to speak to foreigners about jobs unless they already have a visa permitting them to work in the US.
Did I understand correctly, if I have a touristic visa I even can't just speak with supposed employers about job if I am in the USA?
 

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Did I understand correctly, if I have a touristic visa I even can't just speak with supposed employers about job if I am in the USA?
Technically, you can "speak to" potential employers. Though, on entry, if the Immigration agent has reason to believe that you are coming to the US primarily for job hunting (rather than for "tourism") they can refuse you entry.

The problem I was referring to, however, is that there are heavy penalties for the employers if they are caught recruiting or hiring from abroad when there are qualified candidates available in their area with work authorization. Some take the position that they won't talk to any foreigner unless they have the right to work in the US already. In your situation it would be safer to make contacts from where you are and when you find one or more employers who express an interest in hiring you, then you go to the US (for an interview or face to face contact). But don't be surprised if the first thing they ask you is whether or not you have a valid work permit for the US.
 

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Technically, you can "speak to" potential employers. Though, on entry, if the Immigration agent has reason to believe that you are coming to the US primarily for job hunting (rather than for "tourism") they can refuse you entry.

The problem I was referring to, however, is that there are heavy penalties for the employers if they are caught recruiting or hiring from abroad when there are qualified candidates available in their area with work authorization. Some take the position that they won't talk to any foreigner unless they have the right to work in the US already. In your situation it would be safer to make contacts from where you are and when you find one or more employers who express an interest in hiring you, then you go to the US (for an interview or face to face contact). But don't be surprised if the first thing they ask you is whether or not you have a valid work permit for the US.
I understood. Thank you very much.
 
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