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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Scores of young people and various revolutionary forces on Tuesday marched from Shubra to Tahrir Square to denounce Ahmed Shafiq and Mohamed Morsy competing in the presidential election run-off.
They reject any remnant of the former regime or member of the Brotherhood, whom they consider “enemies of the revolution.” They also demand that the Political Isolation Law be applied to Shafiq.
On Monday, Farouk Sultan, head of the Presidential Elections Commission, announced the results of the first round of the elections in which the Brotherhood’s candidate Morsy was in the lead, with 5,764,952 votes, or 25 percent. Shafiq, a former air force commander and Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister, received 5,505,327, or 24 percent. Hamdeen Sabbahi, a Nasserist who has championed Palestinian resistance against Israel, was a close third.
Turnout was 46 percent, which means that about 23.67 million out of 51 million eligible voters cast their ballots.
“The election was rigged,” claimed Assem Ali of the April 6 Youth Movement, adding that they came to protest as individuals and not as members of political movements or parties.
“We will not participate in the run-off, or else it would be recognition of the election and of Shafiq if he wins,” he told Al-Masry Al-Youm.
Former US President Jimmy Carter said he was broadly confident about the election process although Carter Center monitors highlighted several irregularities, notably lack of access in the final aggregation of national results.
But on Monday, Abdel Moneim Abouel Fotouh, a former Brotherhood member, rejected the results saying that the election had not been honest.
Thousands of Egyptians marched on Monday night in protest after the results of the first round were confirmed by the elections committee. “No to Shafiq and to the Brotherhood. The revolution is still in the square,” they chanted.
On Tuesday, dozens of people marched in Alexandria holding banners against Shafiq, one reading: “No to Ahmed Shafiq, a man of the previous regime.”


Could this be the start of the second revolution?
 

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Protest now cannot be acceptable. A democratic process has been followed and unless there is clear evidence of a fraudulent process, the people has spoken! In democracy the majority rules, that is lesson No1. The mature citizen must now either choose, or not vote, remembering that when you dont vote, you actually still do, because your lack of vote improves somebody elses strandpoint. Love it or hate it, that is democracy! Look at my country, we have a corrupt, polygamist idiot for a President, but he is legitimate, the majority choose him!:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Protest now cannot be acceptable. A democratic process has been followed and unless there is clear evidence of a fraudulent process, the people has spoken! In democracy the majority rules, that is lesson No1. The mature citizen must now either choose, or not vote, remembering that when you dont vote, you actually still do, because your lack of vote improves somebody elses strandpoint. Love it or hate it, that is democracy! Look at my country, we have a corrupt, polygamist idiot for a President, but he is legitimate, the majority choose him!:eek:
You forget this is a new democracy and 80% are illiterate and the name of a party called freedom an justice appealed to the populus but they didn't realise that it was the M.B. and the party called the light was salafi. Egyptians I have spoken to all said the same.
 

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You forget this is a new democracy and 80% are illiterate and the name of a party called freedom an justice appealed to the populus but they didn't realise that it was the M.B. and the party called the light was salafi. Egyptians I have spoken to all said the same.
I did not forget. Been here going 8 years. Makes no difference. There can be no excuses, illiterate or not. Democracy allows you to change your mind, and if you learn slowly, that is O/K.:)
 

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Protest now cannot be acceptable. A democratic process has been followed and unless there is clear evidence of a fraudulent process, the people has spoken! In democracy the majority rules, that is lesson No1. The mature citizen must now either choose, or not vote, remembering that when you dont vote, you actually still do, because your lack of vote improves somebody elses strandpoint. Love it or hate it, that is democracy! Look at my country, we have a corrupt, polygamist idiot for a President, but he is legitimate, the majority choose him!:eek:
You see the word "Democratic" describing what happened last week makes me start laughing hysterically :D

But I do agree that this is not the right time for protesting, chaos, violence, etc., the whole country is in a deep sh!t already (And the "democratic" elections made it worse actually) and what the country really needs now is for people to start using the few brain cells that's left in their heads and still actually working to find a way out of this mess :mad:
 

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You see the word "Democratic" describing what happened last week makes me start laughing hysterically :D

But I do agree that this is not the right time for protesting, chaos, violence, etc., the whole country is in a deep sh!t already (And the "democratic" elections made it worse actually) and what the country really needs now is for people to start using the few brain cells that's left in their heads and still actually working to find a way out of this mess :mad:
spot on.

Violence will not solve the mess, but I fear "working" is not something people are used to. Hopefully lesson learnt? we will find out 4 years down the line, if we are lucky :D
 

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spot on.

Violence will not solve the mess, but I fear "working" is not something people are used to. Hopefully lesson learnt? we will find out 4 years down the line, if we are lucky :D
Lesson learnt? You're in Egypt for bloody Christ's sake! :eek:

4 Years, or much less than that if things kept going down the bloody hill :rolleyes:
 

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You forget this is a new democracy and 80% are illiterate and the name of a party called freedom an justice appealed to the populus but they didn't realise that it was the M.B. and the party called the light was salafi. Egyptians I have spoken to all said the same.
Today I heard Fatma Naout, a writer, saying that during the parliament elections, the uneducated Christians were told that the " light party" stands for " the lady of the light" that's why some Christians elected them. :)
 
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