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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

To cut directly to the point, I have received my grant mid of March. Since then, I have been searching and researching the job market in Australia, applying to over 100 positions in all locations.

After much research, I discovered that the local experience requirement is a filtration process by recruiters and not companies themselves. recruiters are basically using it to remove any "weak" candidates from the list that they preset to their clients.

Unfortunately for us, a large percentage of the jobs advertised are from recruiters and not companies. Therefore, I was wondering what is the best way to go around recruiters and get in touch with companies directly.

Appreciate all the feedback!
 

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If the company is using a recruiter then you cannot go around it. They are using a recruiter they trust to bring the type of employee that fits into the culture of the organisation. Someone contacting HR directly is going to be given a black mark. In many cases, the company is not permitted to even talk to potential employees until the recruiter has short listed them...its part of their internal olive. So it's not going to do you any favours.

If you are not in the country...that is the reason you are not being contacted,by recruiters. If they cannot locate a home address in your CV they are going to assume you are overseas, especially if you list PR Visa somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i understand the logic behind hiring recruiters; however, If I am being filtered out from the shortlist just for lacking local experience, then what is my approach ?
 

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i understand the logic behind hiring recruiters; however, If I am being filtered out from the shortlist just for lacking local experience, then what is my approach ?
In my opinion the "local experience" is just an excuse and polite way to say NO...in last few months i met enough people who got interviews/jobs from offshore.

its all about your skills and how well you can present yourself in your resume. If candidates of same skill set as yours with local experience are available in the market then its always a daunting task to get past them as employers have more trust on their experience as that can be validated easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In my opinion the "local experience" is just an excuse and polite way to say NO...in last few months i met enough people who got interviews/jobs from offshore.

its all about your skills and how well you can present yourself in your resume. If candidates of same skill set as yours with local experience are available in the market then its always a daunting task to get past them as employers have more trust on their experience as that can be validated easily.
I am not disagreeing with your point since its a very logical approach by any employer (recruitment consultant).

I am a project engineer with 5 years of Oil and Gas experience with the No.1 EPC company in the middle east. Unfortunately, with the low oil prices, companies aren't confident in hiring people, let alone people with offshore experience.

What i would like to know from experienced people on the forum, which the best way to approach this challenge?
 

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Local experience may be required for positions that benefit from having an established network (e.g. sales positions), but otherwise it can be more about understanding the local environment, legislation, etc.

If you can work out who the company is, then contact them directly. If they redirect you to the recruiter, then that's the path you need to follow. But it's always worth trying to contact the company if you can. Unfortunately it's not unknown for recruiters to advertise positions they have not been hired to fill, so that's something else to watch for.
 

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One way to get around this 'issue' is to network with local people in your industry. Do some Google research, get on LinkedIn or other social media and find people who are working at companies you are targeting and get in touch with them. Find out how the work environment is different, get their perspective on the job market and what you should be targeting in terms of your CV/cover to get noticed by potential employers. I did this when I first arrived and I think it helped me reposition my skills for the local market. It's amazing how much people will talk when you offer to buy them a coffee.

The other thing I've noticed is that migrants with spelling/grammar/style errors in their CVs/covers often get lumped into the 'no local experience' category as well. The assumption is that communication will be a problem, so it's a convenient excuse. This is why it's so important to make sure your CV/cover letters are perfect - get someone to proofread them for you, preferably a native English speaker that can correct for content as well (sometimes a sentence can be perfectly constructed but still sound jilted). Also, not having your CV in the right format is another way of getting lumped into this dreaded category.

Unfortunately, it's an employer's market right now and there are far more capable candidates than jobs at the moment. It's not enough to click send on a bunch of job postings to get a job these days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One way to get around this 'issue' is to network with local people in your industry. Do some Google research, get on LinkedIn or other social media and find people who are working at companies you are targeting and get in touch with them. Find out how the work environment is different, get their perspective on the job market and what you should be targeting in terms of your CV/cover to get noticed by potential employers. I did this when I first arrived and I think it helped me reposition my skills for the local market. It's amazing how much people will talk when you offer to buy them a coffee.

The other thing I've noticed is that migrants with spelling/grammar/style errors in their CVs/covers often get lumped into the 'no local experience' category as well. The assumption is that communication will be a problem, so it's a convenient excuse. This is why it's so important to make sure your CV/cover letters are perfect - get someone to proofread them for you, preferably a native English speaker that can correct for content as well (sometimes a sentence can be perfectly constructed but still sound jilted). Also, not having your CV in the right format is another way of getting lumped into this dreaded category.

Unfortunately, it's an employer's market right now and there are far more capable candidates than jobs at the moment. It's not enough to click send on a bunch of job postings to get a job these days.
I've been doing exactly that for the past month or so; unfortunately, from the 10 people or so I try to contact only one answers. Probably will need to work on my approach a bit.

As for the CV and cover letter, I couldn't agree more. I am thinking of hiring a professional to re-write my CV and a draft copy of the cover letter. What do you think of that?

To tell you the truth, me and my wife are currently working in Dubai with a very comfortable lifestyle, so for us we can wait till the market is favorable again. But once that happens, I want to make sure I am positioned ideally to facilitate my relocation.
 

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I've been doing exactly that for the past month or so; unfortunately, from the 10 people or so I try to contact only one answers. Probably will need to work on my approach a bit.

As for the CV and cover letter, I couldn't agree more. I am thinking of hiring a professional to re-write my CV and a draft copy of the cover letter. What do you think of that?

To tell you the truth, me and my wife are currently working in Dubai with a very comfortable lifestyle, so for us we can wait till the market is favorable again. But once that happens, I want to make sure I am positioned ideally to facilitate my relocation.
Nothing wrong with the current market or we can also say that current job market is the new normal. After the collapse of mining industry its a long way to recovery for Australia.
 

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Oh goodness. It's not Greece, calm down.
Read carefully mate! I said nothing wrong with the job market. Current job market is absolutely normal. Nothing to panic about. Economy is in transition phase from mining to other sectors like tourism and hospitality. And falling dollar is definately a blessing!
 

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Read carefully mate! I said nothing wrong with the job market. Current job market is absolutely normal. Nothing to panic about. Economy is in transition phase from mining to other sectors like tourism and hospitality. And falling dollar is definately a blessing!
My comment was based on your previous posts of impending doom etc blah blah
 

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Does anyone know if having multinational corporations (like Deloitte, P&G, Ferrero, etc.) on your resume is any better than no-name companies if it's non-Australian experience?
 

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I wouldn't say mining is doomed, however it has certainly slowed down.

Multinational corporations can be more appealing on a resume from the perspective that an employer will be more familiar with these organisations vs. a no-name company. I always suggest a short description of the employer, e.g. XYZ Corporation is a national manufacturer of state-of-the art widgets sold through directly and through retail outlets across the country.... It saves me Googling companies I've never heard of.
 
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