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10 out of 11 - I've never heard "avoir l'estomac dans les talons"... but then never heard of "putting ones oar in" either... is that british?
I assumed it was the equivalent of the american "putting in your two cents".
 

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10 out of 11 - I've never heard "avoir l'estomac dans les talons"... but then never heard of "putting ones oar in" either... is that british?
I assumed it was the equivalent of the american "putting in your two cents".
"Putting ones oar in" is a British one..
Hadn't heard of the avoir l'estomac one either.
 

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7/12......real classroom grammar stuff.


I have to say one question was very badly phrased "peut-on écrire........" yes to both possible answers, (it IS possible to write both).....but one is wrong.

But the difference between "may" and "can" gets lost in translation?


pedantically.........DejW




Are you the editor of Complete France ? :eek:

Pointless French test. Full of phrases that nobody uses.

If you want a French test....try this one from Le Figaro.

Viendrez-vous à bout de ce test de français ?

OH (French) got 11 out of 12......and she is quite good in French.
 

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Already did that one Pip and reported on the other thread. Got one wrong (something to do with rabbits IIRC), BUT I read a great deal in French, including historical novels.
 

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Are you the editor of Complete France ? :eek:

Pointless French test. Full of phrases that nobody uses.

If you want a French test....try this one from Le Figaro.

Viendrez-vous à bout de ce test de français ?

OH (French) got 11 out of 12......and she is quite good in French.
That really made me laugh :rofl: - and put me off bothering to do the test (which I would do poorly at anyway, since I've become pretty lazy about getting my grammar back up to scratch - in fact I know it's going downhill now :D
 

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That really made me laugh :rofl: - and put me off bothering to do the test (which I would do poorly at anyway, since I've become pretty lazy about getting my grammar back up to scratch - in fact I know it's going downhill now :D
I did the Figaro test with 'some' support I might add and got 6.

I then answered randomly (without looking at the questions) and got 8 :party:

Random pretty much sums up my French :)
 

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I don't know about you Smeg, but my brain has a particularly obscure approach to tests and exams. When I know it's a test I can concentrate and do quite well (well, better than I should!). However, when it comes to using grammar rules in speech or written (emails!) I forget it all and present a level much lower than the exam results might indicate.

I've noticed this in other areas too.....driving tests (reversing 4 ton truck with trailer), active listening in personal development..and probably cleaning my teeth. Ok in the tests, but terrible in real life.

DejW

I did the Figaro test with 'some' support I might add and got 6.

I then answered randomly (without looking at the questions) and got 8 :party:

Random pretty much sums up my French :)
 

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Came across this interesting map on dialects (they are, of course, not all there) - run your cursor over and you will get both sound and pop-up text (may take a while to load). https://atlas.limsi.fr/

No test, though :D

So how do you fare in one or more dialects?
 

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B'jour b'en, EH, as we say in Cauchois!

Now, dear EH, that's where it starts getting really difficult!

After living in the south for 5 years....(Catalonia nord) I was beginning to understand the local dialect and more importantly, the vocabulary. The most important phrase seemed to be "doucement le matin, pas trop vite le soir".....gently in the morning, not too fast in the evening.

Now back in Normandie it's the Cauchois....."nous avons les vacks dans les camps". (cows in the fields)....there's no "ch" sound. Thanks to William the Conquerer and his little friends some Norman /Cauchois words are close to English. Those French tourists really changed things?

DejW


Came across this interesting map on dialects (they are, of course, not all there) - run your cursor over and you will get both sound and pop-up text (may take a while to load). https://atlas.limsi.fr/

No test, though :D

So how do you fare in one or more dialects?
 

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B'jour b'en, EH, as we say in Cauchois!

Now, dear EH, that's where it starts getting really difficult!

After living in the south for 5 years....(Catalonia nord) I was beginning to understand the local dialect and more importantly, the vocabulary. The most important phrase seemed to be "doucement le matin, pas trop vite le soir".....gently in the morning, not too fast in the evening.

Now back in Normandie it's the Cauchois....."nous avons les vacks dans les camps". (cows in the fields)....there's no "ch" sound. Thanks to William the Conquerer and his little friends some Norman /Cauchois words are close to English. Those French tourists really changed things?

DejW
Neither of your examples, though, are really dialect, rather French with a local accent. I don't have problems with the béarnais accent and it's certainly permeated my own speech, and I can easily understand Jean Lasalle when he speaks on TV (because in those situations he speaks French with a béarnais accent), but as for understanding béarnais (not included on the map) that's a totally different matter.

Oh, and I also have quite a bit of trouble with the patois in the area of the Vosges that my family comes from, albeit when I arrived here I my accent was very close (and there are still some traces that quite a few people will pick up on), but I swear I barely understand any of the patois.
 
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