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I'm a big home chef hobbyist and scratching my head at finding products found in Europe.

The most painful thing I cannot find:

Cooking Apples, otherwise known as Bramley Apples. Can't find them anywhere!

Others are:

Mascarpone Cheese
Ginger Biscuits
Digestive Biscuits
Whipping Cream
Indian Spices
Basmati Rice


When I discover more ingredients I can't find, I'll come back here to see if anyone can help.

Plus I'd love you to voice things you cannot find too, just to make me feel better as a home chef hobbyist who has the wind taken out of his post prestigious recipes.
 

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You live in Los Mochis and wonder why you can't find these ingredients? At least Basmati Rice can be found in Costco, that is if one is close by.
 

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Sorry I can only help with one. Whipping cream is "crema para batir". This shouldn't be too hard to find, as it's used in some Mexican desserts.

(In Guatemala I would often add "para chantilly" but I'm not sure I've heard "chantilly" used in Mexico?)

I pretty sure there are Indian spices and basmati rice in Tepoztlan (which is where my Mexican home is - near Cuernavaca) because there are some Indian restaurants there and I know people in town who cook Indian food, but obviously that won't help you in Los Mochis. I imagine there are other cities you can find these ingredients as well, so if you travel around Mexico in the future you might be able to stock up on some of your "hard to finds".
 

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Sorry I can only help with one. Whipping cream is "crema para batir". This shouldn't be too hard to find, as it's used in some Mexican desserts.

(In Guatemala I would often add "para chantilly" but I'm not sure I've heard "chantilly" used in Mexico?)

I pretty sure there are Indian spices and basmati rice in Tepoztlan (which is where my Mexican home is - near Cuernavaca) because there are some Indian restaurants there and I know people in town who cook Indian food, but obviously that won't help you in Los Mochis. I imagine there are other cities you can find these ingredients as well, so if you travel around Mexico in the future you might be able to stock up on some of your "hard to finds".
In Mexico "crema chantilly" usually refers to whipped cream and mostly the stuff you find in small tubs or aerosol containers. Whipping cream or heavy cream is what you said, "crema para batir" and there is a brand, Lyncott, that is found in Jalisco, Colima and the DF that I have seen. My wife uses it for cooking.
 

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Biscuits this side of the pond are ‘cookies‘ in English and ‘galletas‘ in Spanish.
Rollybrook.com has a translation of foods and ingredients from American English to Spanish. It will help with your search, as will a trip to a larger metropolis. SuperLake, in Chapala could be a worthwhile visit.
Ginger biscuits are probably Ginger Snaps and I have no idea what a digestive biscuit might be. I digest them all.
 

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Whipping cream is indeed crema para batir. Here (Mexico City) we have Lyncott brand available in all the main supermarkets. I don’t know if they have it where you live. There is also something called Chantilly, but here it’s a sort of generic brand name of an artificial cream (similar to Cool Whip), so it won’t be what you want.

Marscapone cheese: check out queso doble crema to see if it would be an acceptable substitute.
 

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I am not sure I could find Mascarpone Cheese in the US. At lease I do not recall ever seeing it. But then again, I do not recall every specifically looking for it. However, I did find a substitute for it just by doing a Google search. As for digestive biscuits, in the US they are called Graham Crackers and you can probably find them under that name in Mexico.
 

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I'm a big home chef hobbyist and scratching my head at finding products found in Europe.
Have you thought of making periodic, maybe twice-yearly, 'road trips' to either Mazatlan or Tucson ... to stock-up on difficult to find food items? Otherwise, as Isla suggests ... you may want to get yourself a copy of an English-language Mexican cookbook ... or utilize just the locally-available ingredients. :D
 

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I am not sure I could find Mascarpone Cheese in the US. At lease I do not recall ever seeing it. But then again, I do not recall every specifically looking for it.
Marscarpone Cheese is easy to find in Chicago, in big box stores such as Wal-Mart, Sams Club and Costoc, and in many supermarkets ... so I'm going to assume it's pretty easy to find in much of the rest of the USA.

As for concocting a substitute for Marscapone Cheese, have a look at this:

Substitute For Mascarpone Cheese Recipe - Food.com
 

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If a digestive biscuit is like a graham cracker, then the closest substitute is Galletas Kraker [sic] Bran or Hony [sic] Bran.
 

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I am not sure I could find Mascarpone Cheese in the US. At lease I do not recall ever seeing it. But then again, I do not recall every specifically looking for it. However, I did find a substitute for it just by doing a Google search. As for digestive biscuits, in the US they are called Graham Crackers and you can probably find them under that name in Mexico.
I've always wondered what digestive biscuits were, an unappetizing name to be sure. Now that I know they are graham crackers, they don't sound so unappealing. Thanks for the information, dw!
 

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In Mexico "crema chantilly" usually refers to whipped cream and mostly the stuff you find in small tubs or aerosol containers. Whipping cream or heavy cream is what you said, "crema para batir" and there is a brand, Lyncott, that is found in Jalisco, Colima and the DF that I have seen. My wife uses it for cooking.
Whipping cream is indeed crema para batir. Here (Mexico City) we have Lyncott brand available in all the main supermarkets. I don’t know if they have it where you live. There is also something called Chantilly, but here it’s a sort of generic brand name of an artificial cream (similar to Cool Whip), so it won’t be what you want.
Thanks, Cristobal and maesonna. That's what I suspected. In Guatemala, whipped cream is referred to as "crema chantilly" (or "chantillí") - the real stuff, not the fake - so I sometimes say "crema para batir" or "crema para hacer chantillí" or even "crema para batir para hacer chantillí" just to be clear... or redundant ... 😋

Also just as an FYI for new Spanish speakers it's not pronounced Chantilly, it's "Shan-tee-EE" with accent on the last syllable. It's always been one of those words I have fun saying.
 

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I've always wondered what digestive biscuits were, an unappetizing name to be sure. Now that I know they are graham crackers, they don't sound so unappealing. Thanks for the information, dw!
They aren't quite graham crackers, although graham crackers should make a reasonable substitute. They're common in Canada, as well, and I often have both grahams and digestives in my cupboard, along with Marias. My husband has to have some type of sweet cracker/cookie with his coffee to keep him happy.



2 other links for info:

The Foods of England - Digestive Biscuits

Digestive biscuit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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Whipping cream is indeed crema para batir. Here (Mexico City) we have Lyncott brand available in all the main supermarkets. I don’t know if they have it where you live. There is also something called Chantilly, but here it’s a sort of generic brand name of an artificial cream (similar to Cool Whip), so it won’t be what you want.

Marscapone cheese: check out queso doble crema to see if it would be an acceptable substitute.
@ the OP:
Mascarpone cheese is sometimes available in Costco, at least in Morelia. Digestive biscuits are Graham Crackers. I don't know if they are to to be found in Mexico—but, WAIT!— Nabisco Honi Brans are nearly identical. Most everything I need is available here, with the exception of cornmeal. And don't anyone suggest sifting ground corn chicken feed as a substitute. It ain't.

(I didn't see that Maesonna had already answered some of the questions.)

Molasses is hard to find (treacle) but there is a product called Melado, which a friend buys in SMA. Or I can always boil piloncillo.

Bottom line is, that with time, and enough pesos, you can find just about any ingredient you desire.
 

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My wife uses galletas Marias as a substitute for graham crackers when a graham cracker crust is used. I think they have a harder consistency than vanilla wafers. More like that of a graham cracker.
 
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