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Alrighty then, from the top. I was born in Colombia but moved to the US at about 3 1/2 years old. I was raised there for 9 years spanning the vast majority of my childhood and my life to this point. My parents entered the US legally were on our way for permanent residence. Unfortunately however, our lawyer forgot a very important letter and because of that our case was considered "abandoned." We had no time to sue to lawyer because we were already asked to leave the country. We decided to try our luck in Canada where we moved to in 2009 when I was almost 13 years of age. As of now we are permanent residents and soon to be citizens. Now however I am looking to immigrate back to the US.

I feel American more than anything else. My heart lives in America where it shall remain always. I still have many friends that I have kept contact with from Florida. I follow American politics, news, took US history classes in Canada, learned some more US history on my own time, and I have also researched American topics for quite some time. I am fully willing to serve the US armed forces if it means I can live there again.

Right now I am applying for university. I am looking at Computer Science, Petroleum Engineering, Computer Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering. My question to you guys is which path will give me the highest probability to permanently immigrating to the US from Canada as a citizen of Canada. I would like to hear my probability in terms of percentages (e.g. 50%-80%). Which path will give me the highest chances of probability. How many Canadians that apply actually get accepted? Will my friends in the US boost my chances. Will the 9 years I have lived there as a child boost my chances? Will joining the military boost my chances? Will immigrating to a small town, accepting lower pay, etc. boost my chances? What if I study in the US? Alternatively what if I study here in Canada, get a few years of experience, and then apply?

Please and thank you.
 

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your journey into the US was not like you described ...but you were to young to know then

you was probably removed for being illegal or overstaying .... getting into Canada ..is amazing they don't normally allow that... your parents mat be banned from the US but as you was under 18 it does not affect you..

if you are citizen of Canada .schooling will be far cheaper for you there ... student visas are non immigrant in the US .. you do the course and go home

Friends cannot help you...the past is against you

you should get you degree in Canada then look for employment in the US after a few years experience
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
your journey into the US was not like you described ...but you were to young to know then

you was probably removed for being illegal or overstaying .... getting into Canada ..is amazing they don't normally allow that... your parents mat be banned from the US but as you was under 18 it does not affect you..
The way you said it as a matter-of-factly rubbed me off the wrong way. I was legal, I went to school, I was hospitalized with surgery - twice. We bought cars, houses, insurance, social security number, we paid our taxes, etc. Orlando, FL also isn't a "sanctuary city" either. When we immigrated to Canada, they even received copies of all of our American documents. Clean as a whistle, was an outstanding student and everything.

When I plan to immigrate back, I will do so by completely different reasons than when my parents did, and also I will support myself. It will be separate from theirs.

if you are citizen of Canada .schooling will be far cheaper for you there ... student visas are non immigrant in the US .. you do the course and go home

Friends cannot help you...the past is against you

you should get you degree in Canada then look for employment in the US after a few years experience
I know it will be cheaper here, but if going to the US will improve my chances then I will pay extra. Maybe I can go on a student visa and then apply for green card?

My networks in the US actually give me a huge advantage over other people. I have a cousin who works for a computer company in Pensacola. My father is her godfather and they have a good relationship. I will humbly request for her assistance, whether it be sponsering me or getting me a job with her connections to the company. My father was also very close to his boss, a millionaire who loved him very much. She said that if my father told her in time, she could have done something. She gives me the greatest hope for returning to the US.

"The past is against me:" I can understand how my school friends may not be of much use, but being against my case is something else entirely. If anything, the fact that I lived most of my life there may actually help my case.

Getting a degree in Canada, then getting some experience, and looking for a job there seems to be the best way at the moment. I however am curious as to which career path will give me the greatest success.
 

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For what It's worth I agree with the original poster. I think that sort of response was out of line.

I'd add one point. The President, Democrats in Congress, and a few (too few) Republicans are pushing for immigration reform including the passage of the so-called DREAM Act. Unfortunately that legislation is currently stalled in the Republican-led House of Representatives. The Republican Majority Leader, John Boehner, doesn't want to bring the DREAM Act to a vote unless he has a majority of Republicans in support even though the Act probably has the necessary support of a majority of all House members. There might also be possible filibuster obstacles in the Senate, but there are apparently enough Senate Republicans that support current drafts of the DREAM Act.

The DREAM Act might apply to you depending on the exact wording and its effective date. (Past drafts have applied to individuals up to age 35 on the date of the law's passage.) The proposed law is intended to provide a lengthy but viable path to U.S. citizenship to individuals who spent a substantial fraction of their childhoods in the United States and are thus "culturally American" in at least some sense.

I would recommend closely monitoring the status of that proposed legislation and, to the extent you can, working to encourage its passage in the U.S. Congress.
 

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On these forums, as well as most places on the Internet these days, there seems to be a tendency to assume the worst when it comes to advice-giving situations. The one thing you need to know here, though, is that your cousin can't sponsor you for a visa. (Unless there is some sort of exceptional rule for Canadians.)

And it's very doubtful that your prior long-term residence in the US will do much for you - at least on the immigration side of the issues. Perhaps if they ever manage to enact this "major reform" of the immigration process they've been talking about for years. But in the current state of Congress, chances aren't good.

Getting a degree in Canada, then getting some experience, and looking for a job there seems to be the best way at the moment. I however am curious as to which career path will give me the greatest success.
This seems to be your best path for the moment. As far as picking a career path with the best possibility of success, it's hard to say. The US Bureau of Labor publishes lists of "occupational outlook" to predict fields that will create large numbers of jobs over the coming years, but you also have to reckon with the availability within the US of viable candidates for the jobs created.

It's probably safe to say that sticking to the "hard" sciences should give you an edge. While you're getting that experience, try to get involved in "international" projects that involve working with your US colleagues or customers. It can be easier to get a transfer or find an employer willing to sponsor you if you're already a known quantity.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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No one here has a crystal ball to determine what education will turn into a career in a highly desired field in ten years or what turn US immigration will take. Go a route which suits your personality and abilities. It is so much easier to work for 40-50 years if it is not daily dread. Wants and needs can change by the time you have a masters and a few years experience - or not.

The move from the US to Canada seems to have some family lore attached to it. It takes more then a piece of paper to be out of status to the point of having to leave and then not being able to obtain it if the issue is known. Well neither here nor there.

Connections are great but the law applies so getting a job offer has to fall within the pages of the book.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Dream Act? I've heard of it but only know do I realize what its about. It sounds really promising!

Oh yeah and I have something I probably should have mentioned before. When I was a baby, I was vaccinated against tuberculosis. The point of the vaccine was for my body to develop antibodies. Just a few months ago however, they gave me a skin test and it came back positive. What the skin test shows is that my body has been exposed to it and developed antibodies. I explained to them it was the vaccine, but they said I still had to take the chest X-ray just to be sure. Will that completely **** up my chances to immigrate to the US? I don't have TB but on the files it will still show latent TB even though I told them it was the vaccine!
 

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The Dream Act? I've heard of it but only know do I realize what its about. It sounds really promising!

Oh yeah and I have something I probably should have mentioned before. When I was a baby, I was vaccinated against tuberculosis. The point of the vaccine was for my body to develop antibodies. Just a few months ago however, they gave me a skin test and it came back positive. What the skin test shows is that my body has been exposed to it and developed antibodies. I explained to them it was the vaccine, but they said I still had to take the chest X-ray just to be sure. Will that completely **** up my chances to immigrate to the US? I don't have TB but on the files it will still show latent TB even though I told them it was the vaccine!
People from the UK moving to the US get this all the time. The majority of UK folks were immunized against TB in the 60/70's. We ALL come up positive when tested for TB and yes, we usually have to do the chest ray then.

This will not hinder your chances of emigrating to the US.
 

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I agree sticking to the hard sciences would be a plus. You could try to enter on a student visa, but you can not adjust your status to a permanent resident. My husband just went through the entire process from Visa to Citizenship. There is a great website that helps you through the process.

Do you speak fluent Spanish? I am wondering because their a some school districts that will give Visas to native Spanish speakers. Although you would have to become a teacher and believe me it is not easy. They recently did this with schools in Spain.
 

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I agree sticking to the hard sciences would be a plus. You could try to enter on a student visa, but you can not adjust your status to a permanent resident. My husband just went through the entire process from Visa to Citizenship. There is a great website that helps you through the process.

Do you speak fluent Spanish? I am wondering because their a some school districts that will give Visas to native Spanish speakers. Although you would have to become a teacher and believe me it is not easy. They recently did this with schools in Spain.
I think visajourney.com is one of the best websites.

Visas to native Spanish speakers?? Umm not sure about that. There are so many people that speak Spanish.
 

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I agree sticking to the hard sciences would be a plus. You could try to enter on a student visa, but you can not adjust your status to a permanent resident. My husband just went through the entire process from Visa to Citizenship. There is a great website that helps you through the process.

Do you speak fluent Spanish? I am wondering because their a some school districts that will give Visas to native Spanish speakers. Although you would have to become a teacher and believe me it is not easy. They recently did this with schools in Spain.
Can you give us a US school district which sponsors visas for educators? Thank you.
 

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I think visajourney.com is one of the best websites.

Visas to native Spanish speakers?? Umm not sure about that. There are so many people that speak Spanish.

I am referring to native Spanish speakers and they have to have the right credentials such as a Degree/Teaching certificate.

Speaking Spanish is different from teaching academic Spanish. There is a shortage of Spanish educators. The test (BTLPT) is no joke either. Conversational Spanish will not cut it.

I know quite a few educators who had degrees in their home country and were able to get district sponsored Visas to work as Bilingual Teachers. My mentor teacher was from Bolivia and came to visit her bother on a tourist visa. She was able to stay and bring her family down after she was recruited by Dallas ISD.

Dallas ISD is always recruiting Spanish speaking teachers.

I believe last year Forth Worth, TX hired a few teachers from Spain. Also you can check these websites out and they provide information about such programs:

https://www.educateiowa.gov/pk-12/award-exchange-programs/visiting-teachers-spain-program

Teacher Exchange Visitor Program
 

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Can you give us a US school district which sponsors visas for educators? Thank you.
Dallas ISD and Fort Worth ISD are known for hiring overseas. There are quite a few districts it's just a matter of researching. Hiring season starts around April so this is when you may find the most information. If I get a hold of more information from Dallas and Fort Worth I will gladly post it. Hope this helps!
 

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Dallas ISD and Fort Worth ISD are known for hiring overseas. There are quite a few districts it's just a matter of researching. Hiring season starts around April so this is when you may find the most information. If I get a hold of more information from Dallas and Fort Worth I will gladly post it. Hope this helps!
Please do so as it might be interesting for other posters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I barely speak conversational Spanish, teaching Spanish doesn't sound too appetizing for me. I'll stick with engineering and computer science.
 

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I barely speak conversational Spanish, teaching Spanish doesn't sound too appetizing for me. I'll stick with engineering and computer science.
Teaching definitely isn't for everyone. I was just trying throw out more options for you. I think sticking with engineering or computer science would be good.

Good Luck!!!
 
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