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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
BTW, do they still sell 'live' rabbits on the market in Sancoins. For all of the problems of Paris, at least you don't have to murder your lunch before eating it. The joys of living in rural France.

Bon Appetite ;)
Yes! The Wednesday market has small livestock, I buy my laying hens there!

Gypsycob x
 

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Yes! The Wednesday market has small livestock, I buy my laying hens there!

Gypsycob x
They have a great selection. Which breed do you prefer? I saw some sussex blanche there which i know are good layers, but do you recommend any others?

Conky x
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Perhaps Bev might move this diversion?

They have a great selection. Which breed do you prefer? I saw some sussex blanche there which i know are good layers, but do you recommend any others?

Conky x
Hi Conk!

The last lot I bought from there were Sussex; pleasant enough birds, easy maintenance and regular layers.

They sell what they call 'Marans'; if you want them for their delicious-looking chocolaty brown eggs that they are famous for, then you will be disappointed as they are more of a hybrid hen and their eggs are unremarkable. They are however, hardy, friendly, eat anything and lay consistently.

If you want regular eggs through the winter, then a few ducks are a must, but they will make your ground muddy! I have seen Indian Runner mixes there and they are great layers. For a family friend with a huge character, then a Muscovy is a must!

If you are not sure which ones to buy, go very early and see which ones the French buy, they'll be the healthiest!

Good luck,
Gypsycob x
 

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Gypsycob, for some reason I thought you were the Cluny side of Bourgogne. I can only assume you are in Dept 58 if you are frequenting Sanscoin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Gypsycob, for some reason I thought you were the Cluny side of Bourgogne. I can only assume you are in Dept 58 if you are frequenting Sanscoin.
I am in the 58, Sancoins is 40 minutes from me.

Gypsycob x
 

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Perhaps Bev might move this diversion?



Hi Conk!

The last lot I bought from there were Sussex; pleasant enough birds, easy maintenance and regular layers.

They sell what they call 'Marans'; if you want them for their delicious-looking chocolaty brown eggs that they are famous for, then you will be disappointed as they are more of a hybrid hen and their eggs are unremarkable. They are however, hardy, friendly, eat anything and lay consistently.

If you want regular eggs through the winter, then a few ducks are a must, but they will make your ground muddy! I have seen Indian Runner mixes there and they are great layers. For a family friend with a huge character, then a Muscovy is a must!

If you are not sure which ones to buy, go very early and see which ones the French buy, they'll be the healthiest!

Good luck,
Gypsycob x
Thanks gypsycob.

I have a few sussex and also a couple of orps that i purchased online, due to my lack of mobility. I can certainly start to add new birds buying direct from the market at sancoin.

My biggest regret was including a cockerel when i purchased the orps. Far too aggressive with all the hens. I might well give him a christmas to remember....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
All livestock must earn their keep, one way or another!

My cock is only into blondes! He adores the wheaten Marans, but is none too gentlemanly with any of the other colours. By the end of the summer the wheaten are exhausted! I couldn't find any more blondes, so I bought him the Sussex; white/blonde, pretty similar I thought, not a chance! He will be meeting a box of Paxo this December too!

For those reading this who are chicken virgins, please introduce new birds carefully:
They are the origin of the phrase "pecking order". The established flock will attack the new birds and occasionally to the death!

To give the new birds a chance of a safe integration, run a second pen alongside the flock, with its own coop for night time. After 3-4 weeks the new birds can be put in with the others, ensuring that the enclosure is big enough to allow them some space from each other. There will still be battles for supremacy, but they should be more orderly!

It is always a good idea to have a second pen & coop available for when you have a sick bird. I use a small dog kennel that I can take the lid off to access the birds easily. Its also useful for managing broody hens!

This thread should now follow on with a million and one ways to use an egg!!

Gypsycob x :D
 

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Reading all this I feel utterly confused already. My daughter has been wanting us to get chickens (but then she wants a donkey, a horse, goats, rabbits and more cats as well) and my husband seems to like the idea of growing our own meat, but this makes me feel like there is a lot to know before getting started.
 

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All livestock must earn their keep, one way or another! My cock is only into blondes! He adores the wheaten Marans, but is none too gentlemanly with any of the other colours. By the end of the summer the wheaten are exhausted! I couldn't find any more blondes, so I bought him the Sussex; white/blonde, pretty similar I thought, not a chance! He will be meeting a box of Paxo this December too! For those reading this who are chicken virgins, please introduce new birds carefully: They are the origin of the phrase "pecking order". The established flock will attack the new birds and occasionally to the death! To give the new birds a chance of a safe integration, run a second pen alongside the flock, with its own coop for night time. After 3-4 weeks the new birds can be put in with the others, ensuring that the enclosure is big enough to allow them some space from each other. There will still be battles for supremacy, but they should be more orderly! It is always a good idea to have a second pen & coop available for when you have a sick bird. I use a small dog kennel that I can take the lid off to access the birds easily. Its also useful for managing broody hens! This thread should now follow on with a million and one ways to use an egg!! Gypsycob x :D
Stupid question I suppose. But does the easy integration of domestic fowl to each other include " headless chickens,?" Fletch.
 

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Reading all this I feel utterly confused already. My daughter has been wanting us to get chickens (but then she wants a donkey, a horse, goats, rabbits and more cats as well) and my husband seems to like the idea of growing our own meat, but this makes me feel like there is a lot to know before getting started.
Chickens are not the most difficult of livestock for beginners - i started from scratch only a year ago. You need decent fox proof housing and some space to let them run around in. My initial housing had an enclosed run of about 3m by 1.5 m which the sellers claimed was sufficient for up to 8 birds and i only purchased 4 . Is it hell. They love space to run around, and are amusing to watch, so give them as much free range as you can. My 6 have about 100 sq metres.

This should keep them happy, and then you only need to worry about adding new hens as gypsycob mentions above. Just forget the cockerel. No matter what you read or what anyone says.

Males only ever cause problems......
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Reading all this I feel utterly confused already. My daughter has been wanting us to get chickens (but then she wants a donkey, a horse, goats, rabbits and more cats as well) and my husband seems to like the idea of growing our own meat, but this makes me feel like there is a lot to know before getting started.
Chickens are easy to keep, but we need to do our best by any animal we enclose as they rely on us totally! I believe that this is a fundamental lesson for our children; we are there for them, not the other way round!

Whether your motivation is avoiding nasty diseases and vets bills or sharing your life with another living breathing creature in all its glory, Google has the answers! Do a bit of research, get some chickens and learn as you go along.

If you prefer paper research, there is a great book by Jeremy Hobson & Celia Lewis, Choosing and Raising Chickens. It has great photos too, so the kids will love it!

Good luck and enjoy,
Gypsycob x
 

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Does it have to be an enclosed run? I thought we would only use that for the first few weeks until they are settled into their routine and then we would have housing for the night and let them run around the property during the day.

Speaking of running around the property. The other day we were in the pool when I saw our dogs running enthusiastically to the far end of our garden. I immediately called them back because I don't want them to run onto the street, but then I saw two men and a minivan with a dog painted on the side. When they saw me they got back into their van and took off. I immediately got the chills and I told my husband, I think someone just tried to steal our dogs. He did not believe me of course, but later I looked up some info on the internet and found that 60.000 dogs are stolen in France every year from yards, cars and even from people walking their dogs. I am terrified tbh. Our dogs are never left alone outside, but they are not always happy to stay in sight when I work in the yard and they are never on a leash. They are hunting dogs so they're very high energy and need to run around. Does anyone know if this is an actual threat or am I completely overreacting?
 

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Does it have to be an enclosed run? I thought we would only use that for the first few weeks until they are settled into their routine and then we would have housing for the night and let them run around the property during the day.

Speaking of running around the property. The other day we were in the pool when I saw our dogs running enthusiastically to the far end of our garden. I immediately called them back because I don't want them to run onto the street, but then I saw two men and a minivan with a dog painted on the side. When they saw me they got back into their van and took off. I immediately got the chills and I told my husband, I think someone just tried to steal our dogs. He did not believe me of course, but later I looked up some info on the internet and found that 60.000 dogs are stolen in France every year from yards, cars and even from people walking their dogs. I am terrified tbh. Our dogs are never left alone outside, but they are not always happy to stay in sight when I work in the yard and they are never on a leash. They are hunting dogs so they're very high energy and need to run around. Does anyone know if this is an actual threat or am I completely overreacting?
May well be a real issue. Desirable dogs do get snatched and re-sold. Not by the French (unless for hunting).
 

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Does it have to be an enclosed run? I thought we would only use that for the first few weeks until they are settled into their routine and then we would have housing for the night and let them run around the property during the day.

Speaking of running around the property. The other day we were in the pool when I saw our dogs running enthusiastically to the far end of our garden. I immediately called them back because I don't want them to run onto the street, but then I saw two men and a minivan with a dog painted on the side. When they saw me they got back into their van and took off. I immediately got the chills and I told my husband, I think someone just tried to steal our dogs. He did not believe me of course, but later I looked up some info on the internet and found that 60.000 dogs are stolen in France every year from yards, cars and even from people walking their dogs. I am terrified tbh. Our dogs are never left alone outside, but they are not always happy to stay in sight when I work in the yard and they are never on a leash. They are hunting dogs so they're very high energy and need to run around. Does anyone know if this is an actual threat or am I completely overreacting?
No it does not have to be an enclosed run, but if you give them free reign around your garden, be prepared to have your flower beds and vegetable plots trampled and savaged unless you enclose these. I find it easier to give them a fenced off area, with moveable fencing.
 

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This has absolutely nothing to do with the subject at hand, but the title of this thread completely cracks me up. Every time I go to the France forum, I see the title of this at the top, and I have to remind myself y'all aren't talking about bachelorette parties, but honest to goodness hens/chickens. And having a party about it, apparently!
 

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This has absolutely nothing to do with the subject at hand, but the title of this thread completely cracks me up. Every time I go to the France forum, I see the title of this at the top, and I have to remind myself y'all aren't talking about bachelorette parties, but honest to goodness hens/chickens. And having a party about it, apparently!
I think Bev gave it the title :D
 
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