Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please help me. I live in Mexico and I'm willing to move for a job. I am fluent in both Spanish and English. I need a job asap. If you think you can help.. please do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
You need to be more specific and information in this Forum. No one here can help you if you do not give more information than a two sentence post.

Use the SEARCH function to get information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
Our OP is not reading the responses to her previous postings.
 
G

·
Please help me. I live in Mexico and I'm willing to move for a job. I am fluent in both Spanish and English. I need a job asap. If you think you can help.. please do.

Are you willing to move like this??? :D:D:D:clap2:



Seriously, what are your talents, training, experience etc other than speaking English and Spanish?



-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
OK i have worked as a CNA in a hospital and as an EMT. I want to continue my studies for nursing as I work.. I just need to be able to pay rent. :cool:
What is an "OP"? I learn quickly and I am very profesional. Thanks for all your help.
Melissa.
If you guys know any websites similar to craigslist or the US unemployment website that would be a great help. Thanks again..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,290 Posts
I'm sorry mstever, you seem very nice, but....

Do you realize that Mexico is doing everything it can to PREVENT you from taking a job away from a Mexican citizen? There is no craigslist or anything like that for foreigners looking for work.

My sister in law (Mexican born citizen) is an EMT in Mexico City. She works six days a week full time to earn just over $1000 USD per month. This is for a person with a college degree and 10 years experience in the field. You can't compete with that resume yet. They aren't remotely interested in part-time workers either.

Even if you could miraculously find hospital/EMT employment, how would you find time to attend classes and do homework to finish your nursing studies while working six days and over 40 hours a week?

Option 1) - stay in the US, finish your degree and figure out what to do next.
Option 2) - come to Mexico for the adventure, get certified to teach English, get a teaching job and live here (modestly) and enjoy life while you decide what to do with the next chapter of your life.

I wish you luck but you are asking the near-impossible.

BTW- OP means "original poster"... that's you!
 
G

·

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,989 Posts
Here's one listing board:

Jobrapido | Bolsa trabajo Enfermera, ofertas empleo

Here's another listing that pays almost 500 pesos per day, less deductions:

Trabajo para estudiantes y pasantes en Enfermería

You can also try the temp agencies, such as ADECCO, etc. The jobs with them are as temps and placed into companies, but if you're good, in many cases the company using you will switch you over to employee status after 90 -180 days to cut their expense.

Good luck.

-
She'll need it, even to get work as a temp. Since she is not a Mexican citizen, mstever will need to apply for a work visa if she wants to work legally, and with all the Mexican citizens who are qualified to do this kind of work, why would an employer jump through the hoops needed to hire her?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,290 Posts
Out of curiosity I took a look at those listings. The fist link shows several jobs and I looked at a dozen or so and among those 12 all but one required a completed degree. Plus, as IslaVerde says, why would they go to the extra trouble to hire a foreigner when they probably have qualified Mexicans lined up to apply? In fact, I believe it may be illegal to hire a foreigner if an equally qualified citizen applies for the same job.

The second listing requires an 'obligatory' IFE which more or less means citizen and elininates the OP. The salary of $498 pesos a day minus taxes and deductions works out to a takehome of about $10,000 a month. One can live modestly on $10k per month but how would the OP be able to study to complete here degree when her job requires 48 hours a week over six days (the specific working days/hours are listed for that job)?

I wish mstevr luck but I fear the job search will be like hunting for the proverbial needle in a haystack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
Out of curiosity I took a look at those listings. The fist link shows several jobs and I looked at a dozen or so and among those 12 all but one required a completed degree. Plus, as IslaVerde says, why would they go to the extra trouble to hire a foreigner when they probably have qualified Mexicans lined up to apply? In fact, I believe it may be illegal to hire a foreigner if an equally qualified citizen applies for the same job.

The second listing requires an 'obligatory' IFE which more or less means citizen and elininates the OP. The salary of $498 pesos a day minus taxes and deductions works out to a takehome of about $10,000 a month. One can live modestly on $10k per month but how would the OP be able to study to complete here degree when her job requires 48 hours a week over six days (the specific working days/hours are listed for that job)?

I wish mstevr luck but I fear the job search will be like hunting for the proverbial needle in a haystack.
There are reasons why you never hear Mexican citizens complaining about "Americans" taking their jobs!! Its because they are mostly not open for us and Mexican employers would rather hire someone that is ok with working 48 hours a week for only 10,000 pesos (725 usd) a month.

DER TURKIN IR JERBS!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
There are reasons why you never hear Mexican citizens complaining about "Americans" taking their jobs!! Its because they are mostly not open for us and Mexican employers would rather hire someone that is ok with working 48 hours a week for only 10,000 pesos (725 usd) a month.

DER TURKIN IR JERBS!!!
In their own way it is a protectionist economy, which in light of what has happened to jobs in the USA is not as repugnant a thought as it was a century ago, when the USA was still younger and creating jobs in their new expanding industrial and geographical nation.

I can't believe I am saying this, but it's a good idea-does that now make me a Conservative? OMG :eek2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
In their own way it is a protectionist economy, which in light of what has happened to jobs in the USA is not as repugnant a thought as it was a century ago, when the USA was still younger and creating jobs in their new expanding industrial and geographical nation.

I can't believe I am saying this, but it's a good idea-does that now make me a Conservative? OMG :eek2:
Not yet. A century ago or a tad more, the American industry was build on the backs of cheap immigrant labor. My grandparents and their relatives worked the steel mills and coal mine of an expanding economy.:boxing:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,458 Posts
Not yet. A century ago or a tad more, the American industry was build on the backs of cheap immigrant labor. My grandparents and their relatives worked the steel mills and coal mine of an expanding economy.:boxing:
Precisely. My grandfather immigrated here and started a small business out of a pushcart. Yours worked, the similarity is that there were jobs, no matter how menial and opportunities that provided the means to step up into a better life, which obviously we as their heirs now enjoy.

Isn't this a bit analogous to the thread: the Mexican government wants to give its citizens the chance to move up an economic ladder, rather than throwing them off it by giving their step to a non-Mexican. Again, that is opportunity for their own citizenry and nothing that in the 21st century is all that bad...except for people like the OP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Precisely. My grandfather immigrated here and started a small business out of a pushcart. Yours worked, the similarity is that there were jobs, no matter how menial and opportunities that provided the means to step up into a better life, which obviously we as their heirs now enjoy.

Isn't this a bit analogous to the thread: the Mexican government wants to give its citizens the chance to move up an economic ladder, rather than throwing them off it by giving their step to a non-Mexican. Again, that is opportunity for their own citizenry and nothing that in the 21st century is all that bad...except for people like the OP.
I think that the difference between protectionism and common sense is that the one manipulates import/export ratios by way of excess tariffs on imports, while the other understands that a society's first responsibility is to those who are citizens, and second to those who are not.

You don't see a lot of highly educated Americans complain about Mexicans taking their jobs. In fact, most of the jobs that were available to immigrants, both legal and illegal, were extremely low paying. As they are going away, and traditional ways for immigrants to earn a living in this country; manufacturing and construction, have suffered setbacks, the stream of humans is trending back to MX, rather than to the US.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
I think that the difference between protectionism and common sense is that the one manipulates import/export ratios by way of excess tariffs on imports, while the other understands that a society's first responsibility is to those who are citizens, and second to those who are not.
what a profound idea ... :clap2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
what a profound idea ... :clap2:
Just to be perfectly clear: that does NOT mean that a society has NO responsibility to those who come to live within it.

Good healthcare, education and provisions for safety are the rights of all of us, whether we are citizens of a country, visitors, or newly arrived immigrants.

The public schools in the US were established, in large part, for the socialization of the children of the tsunami of immigrants that began arriving after the Civil War.

The governments of the states understood that an educated new generation was necessary for the country to continue to grow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
Good healthcare, education and provisions for safety are the rights of all of us, whether we are citizens of a country, visitors, or newly arrived immigrants.
Are we talking just US people or people visiting the US or US people visiting another country? I know for a fact these "rights" are not enforced for everyone on the planet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Are we talking just US people or people visiting the US or US people visiting another country? I know for a fact these "rights" are not enforced for everyone on the planet.
This is my opinion; it hasn't yet become law. ;) But rights can be proscribed, and still be rights, you know.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top