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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone! I think it's time for me to formally introduce myself here. I'm Rebecca and well like everyone here (I think) am planning to move to the UK. I am currently making plans, preparing papers, etc. and I'm glad I found this forum because it's been a huge help so far. I have not been posting much but I have seen the old threads already and I've learned some pretty important stuffs. I am quiet undecided yet so I hope being here will finally help me make my final decision. A little something about me - I am very independent, I love to travel, I love adventure and I love to take risks! Moving to the UK at this stage will be a huge adventure for me. :)

Well that's it for me. Thanks everyone again for the warm welcome! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! Glad to be here as well.

I am currently employed here in oz so maybe I'd like to go to the UK for a visitor visa first and check out what it's really like to live there. I have friends living there already and they're telling me some mixed stuff but I want to experience it for myself.
 

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Thanks! Glad to be here as well.

I am currently employed here in oz so maybe I'd like to go to the UK for a visitor visa first and check out what it's really like to live there. I have friends living there already and they're telling me some mixed stuff but I want to experience it for myself.
Unless you have a British passport or one from other EEA countries, your best bet for an extended stay is ancestry (with UK-born grandparent) or youth mobility scheme (aka working holiday) if you are 30 or under. The first is valid 5 years (and can get you settlement after that) and the latter is 2 years but non-extendable.
The other route, Tier 2 sponsored work visa, can be tricky because you have to have a job offer in advance and your employer has to sponsor you for a visa, with a number of conditions to meet. Unless you are in shortage occupation, they must pass resident labour market test, meaning in spite of extensive advertising, no other suitable worker has applied. With nearly 3 million unemployed, this is an unlikely scenario.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You've probably already got this link to the UKBA pages on general visitor visa but I'll post it anyway:

UK Border Agency | Visiting the UK

When I was planning my first visit to the UK in 20+years I spent hours reading that page and the associated links, lol-I hadn't been over since the early 80s, and there had been a lot of changes!

Yes I already am haunting that website almost everyday but thanks for sharing it! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Unless you have a British passport or one from other EEA countries, your best bet for an extended stay is ancestry (with UK-born grandparent) or youth mobility scheme (aka working holiday) if you are 30 or under. The first is valid 5 years (and can get you settlement after that) and the latter is 2 years but non-extendable.
The other route, Tier 2 sponsored work visa, can be tricky because you have to have a job offer in advance and your employer has to sponsor you for a visa, with a number of conditions to meet. Unless you are in shortage occupation, they must pass resident labour market test, meaning in spite of extensive advertising, no other suitable worker has applied. With nearly 3 million unemployed, this is an unlikely scenario.
Thanks for the response Joppa. Well I don't have British ancestry so that option is out.

Wow really 3 million are unemployed there right now? That's devastating. So that's why some forumers on here are curious why I want to move from oz to the uk.

I am checking out the youth mobility scheme option. In the meantime I'll just learn more here in this forum before I totally take the plunge.
 

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Hi Rebecca,

I've applied for the tier 5 visa as well and have my interview next week. I'm a bit hesitant given the job market these days:confused:.

For those already living in London or anywhere else in the uk, what's the employment situation like at the moment? Because from what I've been hearing it's not all that great.

I'd love to hear from people actually living over there, instead of what the news has to say.

By the way, i'm new to the forum too!

Thanks
 

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Hello everyone! I think it's time for me to formally introduce myself here. I'm Rebecca and well like everyone here (I think) am planning to move to the UK. I am currently making plans, preparing papers, etc. and I'm glad I found this forum because it's been a huge help so far. I have not been posting much but I have seen the old threads already and I've learned some pretty important stuffs. I am quiet undecided yet so I hope being here will finally help me make my final decision. A little something about me - I am very independent, I love to travel, I love adventure and I love to take risks! Moving to the UK at this stage will be a huge adventure for me. :)

Well that's it for me. Thanks everyone again for the warm welcome! :)
Welcome to rainy England:)
 

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Hi Rebecca,

I've applied for the tier 5 visa as well and have my interview next week. I'm a bit hesitant given the job market these days:confused:.

For those already living in London or anywhere else in the uk, what's the employment situation like at the moment? Because from what I've been hearing it's not all that great.

I'd love to hear from people actually living over there, instead of what the news has to say.

By the way, i'm new to the forum too!

Thanks
We're around 2.67 million unemployed at the moment. Not as high as it was, but the figures are 'massaged' horribly. The figures exclude a massive amount of people - for example: jobless people who cannot claim benefits (e.g. married women returning to work), long-term unemployed who are seeking work, people under 18 (a not inconsiderable sum to exclude), people of pensionable age who might never-the-less want to work, people under-employed in part time jobs when they need full time, people who have returned to study to occupy their unemployed time, people on any kind of government scheme - not to mention the 'discouraged worker' who has given up trying.

No-one knows the true number of unemployed. If you try to find it, you'll see figures of 6 million or 11 million banded about, but none of them are substantiated to any degree. Suffice to say it is considerably higher that government statistics lead us to believe.

Competition for jobs is fierce right now, with younger people leaving university and struggling to find work even in the most menial of occupations, and older people facing the reality that they must stay in work for several more years before being able to claim a pension, occupying jobs for longer as a result.

That said, from what I'm reading, it's not terribly good in many parts of the world!
 

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We're around 2.67 million unemployed at the moment. Not as high as it was, but the figures are 'massaged' horribly. The figures exclude a massive amount of people - for example: jobless people who cannot claim benefits (e.g. married women returning to work), long-term unemployed who are seeking work, people under 18 (a not inconsiderable sum to exclude), people of pensionable age who might never-the-less want to work, people under-employed in part time jobs when they need full time, people who have returned to study to occupy their unemployed time, people on any kind of government scheme - not to mention the 'discouraged worker' who has given up trying.

No-one knows the true number of unemployed. If you try to find it, you'll see figures of 6 million or 11 million banded about, but none of them are substantiated to any degree. Suffice to say it is considerably higher that government statistics lead us to believe.

Competition for jobs is fierce right now, with younger people leaving university and struggling to find work even in the most menial of occupations, and older people facing the reality that they must stay in work for several more years before being able to claim a pension, occupying jobs for longer as a result.

That said, from what I'm reading, it's not terribly good in many parts of the world!
You just described the situation in the US. Proportionately, it's exactly the same in the US as it is in the UK. Those numbers the US released today of 80K jobs added? Didn't even come close to beginning to put a dent in US unemployment:(
 

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Yes unemployment very high here in UK at 3,000,000 but don't forget population might larger than Australia too. On quick search actual unemployment rate "only" 2 to 3 % higher than in Aus. Figures probably massaged everywhere - that's governments for you!
 
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