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Discussion Starter #1
This pandemic has put me in an uncomfortable spot.

My husband and I first came into country on Februay 5th, to get an apartment and life set up in advance of getting the passport talent. We had been highly advised to get the apartment first, as it makes the visa more likely.

We landed an apartment for a 2/29 move in, so my husband went back to the US to have his visa appointment. We were going to have him go first, get the visa, then I would go to attend an appointment to get the spousal visa. He managed to get his visa the day the borders closed and by the grace of god made it back into France. I, however, was still here with a tourist visa.

(bonus point - he applied for a 14 month visa, but for some reason was only given a 6 month visa so I am not sure how that might impact any of this)

Fast forward a couple months, and I have gotten the prolongation de le droit de séjour through July from the government, but I still don't have the spousal visa. The borders are obviously still closed, and even if I wanted to risk going to the US to resolve the visa issue, the embassys and VFS are all closed.

The problem is that I am now in healthcare limbo. I have a chronic condition that requires medication that I ran out of 6 weeks ago. I also now have developed an infection under my tooth - I was able to pay out of pocket for a visit and antibiotics, but the tooth is going to have to be pulled in the next couple months.

The short is, I need healthcare - and I seriously doubt I can get on the Carte Vitale right now. I doubt I can do so in the next six months. I have the travelers insurance, but that only covers emergencies (with really low dental coverage). At this point I'd be happy to pay for a private insurance, but all the plans I have found are supplemental to l'Assurance Maladie.

Does anyone have any ideas or resources? Are there any stand alone health care options?
 

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You don't say where you are living (it's more expensive in Paris or other really big cities) but having a tooth taken out costs very little in general; though obviously it depends on the particular problem.

You will be able to pay the costs yourself .. you are on a holiday visa.

US costs are stupidly high. It's not usually like that in Europe.
 

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Anyone who can prove that they reside in France in a "stable and regular manner" since at least 3 months has a right to health cover (PUMA - protection universelle maladie)

It's a difficult time to get things done quickly with the administration (Sécurité Sociale) but it's the only way forward.

You say: "I seriously doubt I can get on the Carte Vitale right now. I doubt I can do so in the next six months"
but you do qualify via more than 3 months residence.

Take your proof of ID, visa and residence to the Sécu and file your demand.

A miracle for dental infections is tea tree essential oil - one or two drops on a cotton bud applied every 2 to 4 hours.
Tastes like petrol but doesn't sting.

Links to webpages (in French) about health cover and residence requirements:

https://www.complementaire-sante-solidaire.gouv.fr/protection_universelle_maladie_puma.php

https://www.complementaire-sante-solidaire.gouv.fr/resider-en-france-stable-regulier.php
 

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This pandemic has put me in an uncomfortable spot.

My husband and I first came into country on Februay 5th, to get an apartment and life set up in advance of getting the passport talent. We had been highly advised to get the apartment first, as it makes the visa more likely.

We landed an apartment for a 2/29 move in, so my husband went back to the US to have his visa appointment. We were going to have him go first, get the visa, then I would go to attend an appointment to get the spousal visa. He managed to get his visa the day the borders closed and by the grace of god made it back into France. I, however, was still here with a tourist visa.

(bonus point - he applied for a 14 month visa, but for some reason was only given a 6 month visa so I am not sure how that might impact any of this)

Fast forward a couple months, and I have gotten the prolongation de le droit de séjour through July from the government, but I still don't have the spousal visa. The borders are obviously still closed, and even if I wanted to risk going to the US to resolve the visa issue, the embassys and VFS are all closed.

The problem is that I am now in healthcare limbo. I have a chronic condition that requires medication that I ran out of 6 weeks ago. I also now have developed an infection under my tooth - I was able to pay out of pocket for a visit and antibiotics, but the tooth is going to have to be pulled in the next couple months.

The short is, I need healthcare - and I seriously doubt I can get on the Carte Vitale right now. I doubt I can do so in the next six months. I have the travelers insurance, but that only covers emergencies (with really low dental coverage). At this point I'd be happy to pay for a private insurance, but all the plans I have found are supplemental to l'Assurance Maladie.

Does anyone have any ideas or resources? Are there any stand alone health care options?
What kind of visa is your husband on? What's the basis of his and by extension your stay?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What kind of visa is your husband on? What's the basis of his and by extension your stay?
He received Passeport talent - VLS-TS. Entrepreneurial activity. The extension of my droit de sejour was justified on the basis that the borders and embassies are closed (so it wouldn't be possible to get the visa even if I could fly), and the chronic condition (which results in immunosuppression) makes this pandemic particularly dangerous for me - ergo, not able to fly to get my proper visa.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Anyone who can prove that they reside in France in a "stable and regular manner" since at least 3 months has a right to health cover (PUMA - protection universelle maladie)

It's a difficult time to get things done quickly with the administration (Sécurité Sociale) but it's the only way forward.

You say: "I seriously doubt I can get on the Carte Vitale right now. I doubt I can do so in the next six months"
but you do qualify via more than 3 months residence.

Take your proof of ID, visa and residence to the Sécu and file your demand.
When you say residence, is it a residence card? Because that's what I don't have yet because of the closures - I am still here on the droit de sejour (basically the tourist visa). Or do you mean proof of residing?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You don't say where you are living (it's more expensive in Paris or other really big cities) but having a tooth taken out costs very little in general; though obviously it depends on the particular problem.

You will be able to pay the costs yourself .. you are on a holiday visa.

US costs are stupidly high. It's not usually like that in Europe.
I was quoted €1900 for the tooth.

Also, that's a smaller problem than the medication I need, which is six figures on the open market.
 

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When you say residence, is it a residence card? Because that's what I don't have yet because of the closures - I am still here on the droit de sejour (basically the tourist visa). Or do you mean proof of residing?
They ask for proof of residence - lease contract for your domicile and utility bill (power/telecom)
 

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I was quoted €1900 for the tooth.

Also, that's a smaller problem than the medication I need, which is six figures on the open market.
The last extraction I had done in France cost me €30 without a Carte Vitale or insurance.

Similarly you can go to any doctor with your US prescription and they will write you out one for the same medication for the local pharmacy. The doctor visit will probably cost €25 and the actual medication will be a fraction of the US cost. Each of these health practitioners will give you a brown form "feuilles de soin" - keep that until you have your Carte Vitale and mutuelle insurance and then you can claim the costs back.

Good luck
 
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The Passeport Talent usually allows the spouse to reside in France, so entering on a tourist visa might not be an issue (albeit you entered before your husband received his Passeport Talent) and should be able to be formally fixed once the Prefectures re-open for such things. In the meantime, you should make the request to join the French health system and back it up with a copy of your husband's visa. All visas for those who are in France have been extended.
 

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Whatever else you do, file for the CPAM ASAP. The worst that can happen is you will be rejected and can ask why and re-file. The best is you will get coverage.
 

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IIRC, we've had a few other folks here on the forum with these Passeport Talent visas and they seem to issue the initial visa for six months. During this time you are expected to register with some agency - possibly the OFII or maybe the préfecture - to validate the full term of your titre de séjour. (Up to 3 years, depending on what type of Passeport Talent you're on.)

If your husband hasn't done so yet, he should try to contact the OFII to ensure that he has properly registered his presence, and they should be able to advise you on your options - given the current travel bans and your health situation.

But as others have said, you should both go ahead and try to register for CPAM and see what they can tell you about obtaining a visa for yourself. One advantage of a centralized administration is that most offices do have contacts or connections with the other offices and can usually at least point you in the right direction.
 

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Two points-Firstly private health insurance will not cover pre existing conditions or will load the premium to make it uneconomic
Secondly I do not know what you will be getting for 1900 euro but it must be the dental equivalent of a Rolls Royce All dentists are required by law to display their charges their charges so you can get an idea but do as others have said Start the CPAM process get treatment and keep the receipts
 

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...Start the CPAM process get treatment and keep the receipts
Which brings up a question. Does the date from which claims can be filed start with the date the Demande d'ouverture des droits 􏰉a l'􏰈assurance maladie is received by the CPAM, or the date on which the numéro sécu is issued? I would assume the latter. But, I am not sure.
 

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The last extraction I had done in France cost me €30 without a Carte Vitale or insurance.

Similarly you can go to any doctor with your US prescription and they will write you out one for the same medication for the local pharmacy. The doctor visit will probably cost €25 and the actual medication will be a fraction of the US cost. Each of these health practitioners will give you a brown form "feuilles de soin" - keep that until you have your Carte Vitale and mutuelle insurance and then you can claim the costs back.

Good luck
These are wise words :)

I looked up my last extraction (a couple of years ago) and it cost 26€ .. then, because I have a carte vitale and a mutualle I was reimbursed quite a chunk of the cost.

1900€ is far too much, as has been said. Find a proper dentist .. not a rip-off merchant.
 

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Which brings up a question. Does the date from which claims can be filed start with the date the Demande d'ouverture des droits 􏰉a l'􏰈assurance maladie is received by the CPAM, or the date on which the numéro sécu is issued? I would assume the latter. But, I am not sure.
It is normally from the date they accept your file as complete (which is not necessarily the date they receive the application given they sometimes ask for additional information).
 

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I don't know the exact dates for claims prior to the issue of a CV. We made doctor visits etc as soon as we arrived and did not get CVs until at least 6 months later. All was reimbursed by CPAM but only by the mutuelle from the start of the cover.
 

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It is normally from the date they accept your file as complete (which is not necessarily the date they receive the application given they sometimes ask for additional information).
Thanks. So, that brings up the next question... How does one determine that date? (Obviously sometime after they have received the application -- all the more reason to use a lettre suivie or lettre recommandée.) I don't think that date is visible on the Attestation de droits. The date the numéro sécu (permanent or temporary) was issued is also not visible. But, in that case, at least you have the letter they sent.

This is only of academic interest to me. But might be of some importance to ssgray.
 

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I don't know the exact dates for claims prior to the issue of a CV. We made doctor visits etc as soon as we arrived and did not get CVs until at least 6 months later. All was reimbursed by CPAM but only by the mutuelle from the start of the cover.
But I believe you had S1s.
 

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Yes we did, good point
 
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