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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I'm evaluating many things before moving to Australia. I had a question regarding healthcare benefits in australia as I'm applying for PR.Does it cover all medicines and pathology charges or they pay partially like 50%?

We might plan for a baby after few months in Australia. If I go for public hospitals, how much expense then we would need to bear. Does medicare cover all expenses like checkups,ultrasounds,medicines etc?
 

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Hi rujutaraval,

check the Beginning a Life in Australia booklet, especially chapter 14. Generally speaking, it's a co-paying system, so you will have to pay part of the costs out of your own pocket but the government helps. It also depends on the state/region you are moving to, to quote form the booklet:

In addition to Medicare there are also many private health insurance funds that offer insurance to cover services not covered by Medicare for example, most dental care, most optical care and ambulance transport in most states and territories.
When you visit your doctor, they may bulk bill. This means the doctor will claim from Medicare and you will not have to pay for the service. If the doctor does not bulk bill, you will be asked to pay for your treatment and you may be able claim some of the costs back from Medicare or your private health insurance fund.
The most suitable combination of Medicare and maybe private insurance funds depends on your personal circumstances (family or single) and health. Note that if you sign up for private health cover, there is usually a 12 month waiting period for services as a new customer. There are special payments for people with disabilities or chronic illnesses from the government and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme Safety Net helps if your family has high expenses for medicines.

Childbirth:
NIB (which is a private health provider, so keep that in mind ;)) put up a The costs of having a baby [in a private hospital] guide, which can give you a rough estimate. They state that out-of-pocket expenses for a private health pregnancy and birth is anywhere from $2,445 to $8,355.

Out-of-hospital expenses like obstetrician appointments are often not covered, so if you go for private health cover you should check whether it's included. One ultrasound should cost you around 170AUD, a normal visit to the obstetrician about 100AUD - but once again, that depends on where you live and which doctor you consult. On the other hand, giving birth at a public hospital should not cost you anything. Many decide to go for a 'shared-care' scheme, where you split your check-ups between your GP and the maternity clinic at the hospital.

Cheers,
Monika
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi rujutaraval,

check the Beginning a Life in Australia booklet, especially chapter 14. Generally speaking, it's a co-paying system, so you will have to pay part of the costs out of your own pocket but the government helps. It also depends on the state/region you are moving to, to quote form the booklet:





The most suitable combination of Medicare and maybe private insurance funds depends on your personal circumstances (family or single) and health. Note that if you sign up for private health cover, there is usually a 12 month waiting period for services as a new customer. There are special payments for people with disabilities or chronic illnesses from the government and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme Safety Net helps if your family has high expenses for medicines.

Childbirth:
NIB (which is a private health provider, so keep that in mind ;)) put up a The costs of having a baby [in a private hospital] guide, which can give you a rough estimate. They state that out-of-pocket expenses for a private health pregnancy and birth is anywhere from $2,445 to $8,355.

Out-of-hospital expenses like obstetrician appointments are often not covered, so if you go for private health cover you should check whether it's included. One ultrasound should cost you around 170AUD, a normal visit to the obstetrician about 100AUD - but once again, that depends on where you live and which doctor you consult. On the other hand, giving birth at a public hospital should not cost you anything. Many decide to go for a 'shared-care' scheme, where you split your check-ups between your GP and the maternity clinic at the hospital.

Cheers,
Monika
Ok thanks a lot for the userful info:) I have gone through that doc and bit confused. If I go for public hospital and doctor prescribes some medicines(not for a long time),then will I be able to get some discounts/waiver from medicare/PBS ?
 

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Ok thanks a lot for the userful info:) I have gone through that doc and bit confused. If I go for public hospital and doctor prescribes some medicines(not for a long time),then will I be able to get some discounts/waiver from medicare/PBS ?
I do not think you get such kind of discounts even in govt hospitals in India. That is too much of expectation, already Australian govt is doing wonderful and incredible things for migrants. However, a good service from Hospitals in Australia should be guaranteed if not any waivers in every situation that one expects.

You gathering knowledge and information for your emergency is no offense. So, no offence meant.

Best regards,
JR
 

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Hi rujutaraval,

Many medicines cost much more than you pay—some cost hundreds of dollars. The Australian Government pays for some of it for you through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS).
Not all medicines are included, of course. If you have a specific condition and are reliant on certain medicines you can check if the government subsidies it and how much you'd have to pay on the PBS homepage. For example, Lisinopril - a blood pressure drug - will cost a patient between 18.33 and 21.30AUD per package, depending on the brand. Also note:

If your doctor has written a non-PBS or private prescription, you will have to pay the full price for this medicine. These medicines don’t count towards the PBS Safety Net. Also, if you choose a higher-priced brand of medicine, or your doctor prescribes one, you may need to pay more.
Cheers,
Monika
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Monika for the detailed explanation. @Jre05 - Don't mind my words but I'm not expecting anything but wanted to clarify few things before we plan to shift to know whether we will be able to survive or not , and I think that's what the forum is all about. I have right to question anything I have in my mind.
 
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Thanks Monika for the detailed explanation. @Jre05 - Don't mind my words but I'm not expecting anything but wanted to clarify few things before we plan to shift to know whether we will be able to survive or not , and I think that's what the forum is all about. I have right to question anything I have in my mind.
Hello Rujutaraval,

True, I am with you. No offense in gathering information, that is what I have mentioned in my post above too. Sorry if you took my response personally. It was a generic response and not certainly intended on you or any other individuals :)

In fact, so many of us are also getting awareness of a lot of information from this thread. Thanks rujutaraval.

Best regards,
JR
 

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I do not think you get such kind of discounts even in govt hospitals in India. That is too much of expectation,
Just to correct your generic statement :
I can speak of the government hospitals in the state I am from in India -forget discounts if you are deserving (either by your appearance or you specifically mentioning to your doctor that you cannot afford the medicines)- most of your meds are free. Its a different thing that you may have to pay some 'chai pani' to the dispensing fella. Most govt. hospitals dispense generic drugs for free. I have been there and done that. If you haven't been to one you will be surprised to see how many well to do people queue up at govt. hospitals for getting treated by the deans and professors of that particular field.

Another example - birth control (condoms/birth control pills). They are distributed free at govt. bus stands and hospitals.

Also, the state govt. of AP covers pensioners and people below poverty line by the government insurance Aarogyasri. Its a different thing that the govt is billed high expenses for simple OP procedures - from which the govt. officials get a cut.
 
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